Bryson DeChambeau said it was special to join elite company in Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus with his U.S. Open victory.

DeChambeau pulled away for his first major success, winning by six strokes at Winged Foot in New York.

The American, 27, carded a three-under 67 in the final round on Sunday and was the only player to finish under par.

DeChambeau joined Woods and Nicklaus as the only players to win the U.S. Amateur, U.S. Open and an individual title at the NCAA Division I Men's Golf Championship, and it was company the winner was delighted to join.

"It's just an honour. I don't know what else to say. It's been a lot of hard work," he said.

"Mr Nicklaus has been always awesome to me. He gave me a sponsor's invite. Tiger has always been great to me. I can't say thank you enough to them for them helping me push me along to be a better person and a better golfer, as well.

"But to be in the likes of the names of that company is special. I'll forever appreciate that."

As overnight leader Matthew Wolff fell away in the final round, DeChambeau mixed an eagle with two birdies and a bogey.

The pair traded eagles at the ninth and DeChambeau said his 39-foot putt led to him thinking about lifting the trophy.

"It's kind of interesting, on nine is when I first thought, 'Okay, this could be reality'," he said.

"I made that eagle, long eagle putt and I shocked myself by making it, too, and I thought to myself, I could do it. And then immediately after, I said, 'Nope, you've got to focus on each and every hole', and I just kept throughout the course of the back nine telling myself, 'Nope, we've got three more holes, we've got four more holes, we've got five more holes', whatever it was.

"I just had to keep focused, making sure I was executing every shot to the best I possibly could."

If Blink 182 are to be believed, nobody likes you when you're 23. 

Not that Collin Morikawa will care much if the song lyric is true, given he will start a new week as a major winner following his stunning US PGA Championship victory. 

A flawless six-under-par 64 in Sunday's final round earned the up-and-coming American a two-shot win from Dustin Johnson and Paul Casey. 

Only two men - Gene Sarazen (twice) and Tom Creavy - won the tournament before turning 23, while Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy were the same age as Morikawa when they triumphed. 

Esteemed company for Morikawa, then. Here is what the new major champion will now try and live up to. 

Jack Nicklaus (1963 - aged 23 years, six months) 

'The Golden Bear' was already a two-time major winner by the time he claimed the PGA Championship for the first time at the Dallas Athletic Club in July 1963. Nicklaus was three strokes back of leader Bruce Crampton heading into the final round but wound up winning by two shots from Dave Ragan. Nicklaus' haul of 18 majors remains a record, while his five PGA Championship triumphs is a joint-best with Walter Hagen.  

 
Tiger Woods (1999 - aged 23 years, seven months) 

In a memorable Medinah battle with fellow youngster Sergio Garcia, Woods prevailed to win the PGA Championship 21 years ago. He led Garcia by five after the 11th but stumbled down the stretch and triumphed by a solitary stroke. The American now has 15 majors to his name, while Garcia has just the one having been tipped to win multiple during those early years. Woods has four PGA Championship wins to his name, the last of which came in 2007. 

 
Rory McIlroy (2012, aged 23 years, three months) 

A couple of 67s sandwiched a 75 prior to a magical Sunday at Kiawah Island for a still fresh-faced McIlroy. The Northern Irishman needed just 24 putts in a round of 66 en route to winning by a record eight strokes as his nearest rivals stumbled. It was the first of McIlroy's two wins at the PGA Championship, the other coming two years later. Arguably the biggest surprise is the fact McIlroy has not yet managed to add another major since, with the former world number one stuck on four. 

Collin Morikawa made history after clinching the US PGA Championship in San Francisco, while he became the third-youngest winner since World War II.

Morikawa celebrated a breakthrough on Sunday, claiming his maiden major title by two strokes in a thrilling finish at TPC Harding Park.

The 23-year-old posted a final-round 64 to finish 13 under for the tournament, ahead of Paul Casey and Dustin Johnson.

With back-to-back rounds of 65 and 64 for a 129 score, Morikawa recorded the lowest closing 36-hole tally by a major champion.

Aged 23 years, six months and three days, Morikawa also became the third-youngest champion of the major since 1946, only behind Jack Nicklaus (23 years, six months in 1963) and Rory McIlroy (23 years, three months and eight days in 2012).

Morikawa's six-under-par 64 in the final round also tied the lowest final-round score by a US PGA winner since Steve Elkington in 1995.

Jack Nicklaus has revealed he and his wife have recovered from coronavirus after testing positive back in March.

The 18-time major winner and his wife, Barbara, both turned 80 earlier this year and are considered in the at-risk group for the virus given their age.

Nicklaus said he suffered from a sore throat and cough while his wife was asymptomatic, with the two remaining in their Florida home for over a month as they battled the illness.

Both have since tested negative for the virus and positive for antibodies.

"It didn't last very long, and we were very, very fortunate, very lucky," Nicklaus said during CBS' coverage of the Memorial Tournament.

"Barbara and I are both of the age, both of us 80 years old, that is an at-risk age.

"Our hearts go out to the people who did lose their lives and their families. We were just a couple of the lucky ones."

Nicklaus was in attendance for Sunday's final round at the Memorial Tournament, which is played at the Muirfield course in Ohio he designed.

The winner traditionally shakes hands with Nicklaus, but Jon Rahm instead settled for a fist bump.

"I've been dreaming of that handshake many times,'' Rahm said.

"Well, it was a fist bump because of the situation, but still, how many people can say they got a congratulatory fist bump from Jack Nicklaus?"

Tiger Woods, a five-time winner at the Memorial Tournament, added: "The fact that they got through it and they're safe and here and healthy, it's all good news for all of us who are a part of golf and who looked up to Jack and [have] been around Barbara all these years."

Jack Nicklaus finished just ahead of Tiger Woods to be crowned The Open For The Ages champion in a dramatic conclusion at St Andrews.

With the coronavirus outbreak having led to the cancellation of this year's Open, organisers created a celebratory edition involving some of the sport's greatest names, with archive footage used to recreate the action.

The winner was worked out through the combination of a fan vote and a data model that utilised career statistics and historical Open data.

Legendary duo Nicklaus and Woods were tied at the summit of the leaderboard on 12 under heading into the last day – and the pair did not disappoint in a thrilling final round.

After top spot had changed hands across an entertaining day, the crucial moment came on the penultimate hole when Woods – who has claimed two of his three Open victories at the St Andrews course – bogeyed.

Nicklaus, an 18-time major winner, had seen a birdie putt at the 17th drift narrowly wide but a par at the last was enough, the American completing a blemish-free 68 to win by a solitary shot from his compatriot.

Seve Ballesteros finished up in third on 15 under par, two clear of Tom Watson and Nick Faldo.

The 149th edition of the Championship had been scheduled to take place this week, but Royal St George's must wait another year due to the ongoing impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

St Andrews will next host the tournament in July 2022, as it celebrates its 150th edition.

Tiger Woods might be at the centre of attention, but big-hitting Bryson DeChambeau was impossible to ignore ahead of the opening round of the Memorial Tournament.

Superstar Woods and the newly bulked-up DeChambeau practised together on the eve of the tournament, which marks the former's return to the PGA Tour for the first time since its coronavirus suspension.

While Woods has been away, DeChambeau has been hard at play, the new power generation leader stretching his run of top-10 finishes to seven tournaments, including a win at the Rocket Mortgate Classic in Detroit earlier this month.

Tackling the Muirfield Village course this week is the latest challenge for DeChambeau, who has bulked up physically in recent months to greatly improve his distance off the tee. Many bookmakers make him the favourite for this week, given his recent consistency.

Where Woods was once the biggest hitter on tour, DeChambeau is now setting the standards in length, but with extra yardage comes the need for greater subtlety with the short irons, and that is an area where DeChambeau knows he needs to tune up.

"I haven't really worked that hard on it because I've been working so hard on the driving and on the putting, and it showed in Detroit," DeChambeau said.

"That's the next step for us and for my team ... how to become like a Steve Stricker or like a Tiger with his wedges, or JT, Justin Thomas. He's unbelievable with his wedges. If I could gain a little bit of that magic, that's just another edge that we're trying to get at.

"I have worked on it a little bit. I know where we're going to be heading to try and test some stuff."

DeChambeau, who will begin in a group with Collin Morikawa and Patrick Cantlay,has long lived in awe of 44-year-old Woods, the 15-time major winner.

"Even now, he's hitting it pretty long. There was a couple of holes he hit 320, 325 [yards]. That's pretty good for his age. It's amazing for his age," DeChambeau said.

"I'd say that he inspired a whole new group of golfers to do new and amazing things, to not be afraid of hazards, to not be afraid of tough golf courses and go after it and just play without fear.

"I never imagined that I'd be even hitting it this far. That was never my game. It wasn't a thought until this last fall, until I started saying, you know what, maybe there's something here. Maybe I can gain a little bit of yardage if I go down this route, and lo and behold, there was a lot of yardage to be gained that I never thought I would have done when I was a kid."

Jack Nicklaus, the founder of Muirfield Village, said he is relishing seeing DeChambeau close up this week.

"I've seen him on television, and he's a much bigger man. But he was tall to start with, but if he's carrying 250 pounds, that's a lot of weight for Bryson," Nicklaus said.

"But Bryson, he doesn't look heavy, he just looks big. I want to watch a little bit, watch him play a little bit. I'd like to see what he does and how he's actually doing that because he's obviously doing something right. The ball is going a long way. And he's playing well with it."

As for DeChambeau, he would love to impress Nicklaus, golf's greatest champion.

"Anytime you get to play Muirfield Village and play in front of Jack, it's a special honour," said the 26-year-old.

"It's definitely a challenge no matter how you look at it with this added length, and I appreciate it, and look forward to using it to my advantage hopefully a few times this week."

June 15 is a momentous sporting date that the Detroit Pistons and their fans will not forget in a hurry.

Sixteen years ago on this day, the team earned an emphatic 4-1 win over favourites the Los Angeles Lakers to seal glory in the NBA Finals.

This date also represents the 40-year anniversary of a famous day in golfing history, when Jack Nicklaus broke a record at the U.S. Open.

We look back at some of the top moments to occur on June 15 in the world of sport.


2004 - Pistons top Lakers 4-1 in NBA Finals

The Pistons sealed a stunning 4-1 series win over the Lakers on this day in 2004, with a 100-87 win in Game 5 ensuring they secured glory in Michigan.

Richard Hamilton top-scored with 21 points, Ben Wallace starred with 22 rebounds and Chauncey Billups had a game-high six assists.

Billups was named Finals MVP as coach Larry Brown savoured his first championship, his underdog team having won three straight after going down to an overtime loss in Game 2.

Game 5 was notable as the last game for Shaquille O'Neal, Karl Malone and Gary Payton for the Lakers, who had won previously three straight titles between 2000 and 2002.

This remains the Pistons' most recent NBA title, as they lost a thrilling Finals series 4-3 to the San Antonio Spurs the following year and have not returned since.

The Lakers, meanwhile, reached three straight Finals when coach Phil Jackson returned to the team later in the decade, winning two, including their last triumph in 2010.

Kobe Bryant top-scored with 24 points in a losing effort against the Pistons in Game 5.

He would go on to be named NBA Finals MVP in each of their 2009 and 2010 successes, moving on to five rings in the process.


1980 – Nicklaus sets record in U.S. Open triumph

Jack Nicklaus' fourth and final U.S. Open victory was a special one in 1980.

The American set a new tournament scoring record with an eight-under par score of 272 to win his fourth title at the event, finishing two shots clear of Japanese challenger Isao Aoki.

Nicklaus had started the week with a magnificent 63 to take a share of the first-round lead, and led by two after a more steady effort of 71 on day two.

After moving day, he was in a share of the lead with Aoki while four other players, including Tom Watson, were within two shots.

A thrilling finale was in store for June 15 and Nicklaus delivered with a 68 to claim his 16th major, 18 years after winning his first U.S. Open.

He romped to US PGA glory later that year, before his 18th and final major arrived six years later at the 1986 Masters.
 

1974 - Evert wins first of seven French Opens

American Chris Evert holds the women's singles record with an astonishing seven French Open titles.

She won the first of her Paris crowns on this day in 1974, emphatically defeating the third seed, Russian Olga Morozova, 6-1 6-2.

In the absence of Margaret Court, who had beaten her in a three-set thriller in the previous year's final, top seed Evert thrived.

She went through the whole tournament without losing a set, with German Helga Masthoff, the fourth seed, seen off in the semi-finals in a tougher test than she ended up having in the showpiece.

Evert also won Wimbledon that year as part of a sensational 55-match winning streak.

She successfully defended her French Open title the following year, and her third success in 1979 started a streak of five wins in the space of five years.

Tiger Woods' sensational triumph at the 2019 Masters is proof he can surpass Jack Nicklaus' record major haul, but it would be nice if he finished his career tied with the 'Golden Bear', says Padraig Harrington.

A year ago, Woods ended a painful 11-year wait to once again win one of golf's big four tournaments when he overcame a two-shot deficit at the start of round four to secure a fifth green jacket.

It was Woods' 15th major victory, but now aged 44, time is running out for him to overhaul Nicklaus' benchmark of 18.

However, Harrington – a three-time major winner and Europe's next Ryder Cup captain – labelled Woods as the greatest ever and thinks he can still achieve the feat, even though he would love to see the two legends share the record.

"There's no doubt it was a great moment for golf, I was amazed by the style he did it in," Harrington told Stats Perform.

"I always thought he was going to win another major, now I actually think he can get to the 18 or 19.

"At the time before that I was thinking Tiger is good enough to get himself in contention, he'll be having a good week and when he's there the old Tiger will come back and he'll make a few birdies, a bit like Nicklaus winning the Masters in '86, and other guys will fall away.

"I just didn't think he'd win it the way he did - Tiger dominated that last round, the players ran away from him like it was the Tiger of old, it was a surprise to me.

"I knew Tiger could win another major, but I thought he'd win it like everyone else, get in the right position and one or two things happen at the end, but this was a dominant performance.

"It's different to what I expected, it showed he was in control, it wasn't circumstances. The likelihood is he could do that again and that's why I think now he can win another three majors.

"I'd personally like him to win another three, not four. It would be nice if he tied with Jack. I think Jack was great for the game.

"I personally think Tiger is the best player ever, I never got to play with Jack in his prime so I don't necessarily want him to beat such a legend, a tie would be very nice in my eyes, so let's hope he gets another three."

This year's Masters was postponed due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and is now slated to take place in November.

Woods' history of back injuries is well documented, and Harrington says only he will know if the extra time will be good for him physically.

"I think at the moment Tiger was struggling, his injuries do seem to be there, there's a lot of ups and downs in his injuries," Harrington added.

"In November he could be just as injured or he could be much better, we're never quite 100 ,per cent sure.

"He would have been trying to compete for Augusta, Tiger tends to get these things right too, so you'd think he'd be getting right and getting his back ready for Augusta.

"Another six months would be good for his back, or I think it would be. He's six months older, I don't know really. Tiger's really the only one who can tell if this is positive or negative in terms of how he feels his physical state will be.

"It's funny, we're talking mental state for everyone else and it's Tiger's physical state we're thinking of.

"But look, everybody will make the most of their opportunity when they get there, I don't see it making a huge difference. If you're serious about winning Augusta, you're going to be preparing for that April week, now you're going to be preparing for November."

Monday marks the 34th anniversary of Jack Nicklaus' 18th and final major championship victory.

A stunning Masters triumph on April 13, 1986 saw the Golden Bear, who was 46 at the time, add a sixth success at Augusta to his five US PGA Championship titles, four U.S. Open wins and three Open Championship crowns.

Tiger Woods - last year's memorable Masters champion - has since closed to within three of Nicklaus' benchmark, but the latter remains golf's most prolific major champion.

We take a look at how Nicklaus amassed a tally that has still yet to be surpassed.

 

1962 U.S. Open

Nicklaus finished second in the 1960 U.S. Open at Cherry Hills as an amateur. When he played the tournament as a professional for the first time two years later, after nine major appearances outside the paid ranks, the then-22-year-old secured glory.

Arnold Palmer – an established superstar in the prime of his career – had edged out the youngster at Cherry Hills, but Nicklaus held his nerve at Oakmont to prevail in an 18-hole play-off after the pair had finished regulation play level on one under.

Palmer was the big crowd favourite in the play-off, but Nicklaus stormed into an early lead before seeing off a trademark charge from his rival to become the youngest U.S. Open winner since Bobby Jones in 1923.

1963 Masters

Having seen off Palmer to earn his maiden major, Nicklaus shaded another all-time great on his way to the first of six Masters triumphs.

A month shy of his 51st birthday, Sam Snead moved into the final-day lead with back-to-back birdies at 14 and 15, but two late bogeys followed for the veteran and Nicklaus – who had surged into contention with a second-round 66 after opening with a 74 - took advantage.

Gains at the 13th and 16th lifted Nicklaus to a winning score of two under, two clear of Snead and Julius Boros and one ahead of Tony Lema, who birdied the last to claim sole second.

1963 US PGA Championship

Still only 23, Nicklaus prevailed in stifling heat at Dallas Athletic Club to grab his second major of 1963 and become only the third player to win the Masters and US PGA in the same year.

Three behind Bruce Crampton with 18 holes to play, the Ohio native defied temperatures of over 100 degrees Celsius on the final day to shoot 68 and win by two from Dave Ragan.

1965 Masters

Nicklaus' first three major successes all came via narrow margins, but that certainly was not the case at Augusta in 1965 as he recorded a record-breaking triumph.

Tied for the lead at halfway with Palmer and Gary Player, Nicklaus surged clear with a course-record-equalling 64 and ultimately finished an astonishing nine strokes clear at 17 under, having totally overpowered the course.

His 72-hole total of 271 and winning margin both stood as records until 1997, when Tiger Woods claimed a 12-shot victory with a score of 270.

1966 Masters

Twelve months later, Nicklaus became the first man to successfully retain the Masters, a feat since accomplished by Nick Faldo and Woods. However, his success came in a week of personal heartbreak.

Shortly before beginning his opening round, Nicklaus learned that close childhood friend Bob Barton had been among four people killed in a plane crash en route to Augusta.

"This tragedy has made me much more determined in what I hope to do this week," said the Golden Bear, who duly beat Tommy Jacobs and Gay Brewer in an 18-hole Monday play-off after the trio had all finished on 288.

1966 Open Championship

Only five men have completed a career Grand Slam of modern-day major wins. Nicklaus was only 26 when he became the fourth, following in the footsteps of Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan and Player.

A one-shot victory at Muirfield – at the expense of Doug Sanders and Dave Thomas – enabled Nicklaus to lift the Claret Jug for the first time. He did so despite shooting 75 in round three, with a two-under aggregate ultimately enough to earn glory on a course that featured plenty of punishing rough.

1967 U.S. Open

Another record fell to Nicklaus at Baltusrol in 1967, where his winning score of 275 represented a new U.S. Open best.

Amateur Marty Fleckman was the shock 54-hole leader but he faced daunting task on the final day with Nicklaus, Palmer and Billy Casper only one shot back.

The rank outsider slumped out of contention with a closing 80 and Casper (72) also faded as Nicklaus again got the better of Palmer, shooting 65 to his playing partner's 69 for a four-shot victory.

1970 Open Championship

Nicklaus' second Open win – after a barren spell spanning three years - is remembered more for the painful experience of runner-up Sanders.

Second to Nicklaus in the same event four years earlier, Sanders needed only to par the relatively simple 18th at St Andrews to claim his first major.

However, he famously backed away from a three-footer for the win, having seemingly been distracted by something on the line of his putt, and then saw his ball slip agonisingly past the hole.

The Open's first 18-hole play-off followed and Sanders was given renewed hope when he cut Nicklaus' lead from four to one with a solitary hole to play before playing the last superbly. The American provided a clinical finish, though, draining an eight-foot birdie putt before throwing his putter into the air in jubilation.

1971 US PGA Championship

Victory in the 1971 US PGA ensured Nicklaus became the first player to win each major twice.

He went wire-to-wire at Palm Beach Gardens in Florida, finishing two clear of Casper at seven under despite a one-over 73 in the final round.

1972 Masters

The following April, Nicklaus again led after every round of a major as he triumphed in the Masters for the fourth time.

He failed to break par in each of the final two rounds, but scores of 73 and 74 were more than enough for a three-shot success at two under, with no other player ending the week in red figures.

1972 U.S. Open

Legendary sportswriter and author Dan Jenkins provided the most fitting description of Nicklaus' final-round performance at Pebble Beach, which saw him defy brutal conditions to make it two wins from as many major championships in 1972.

After Nicklaus had prevailed by three strokes with a two-over aggregate, Jenkins wrote in Sports Illustrated: "On the last day, Sunday, when a ripping wind produced the ultimate horrors, only Nicklaus could summon the patience and the game to cope with the place. It seemed he had saved his best golf for the final round, when the course and the elements almost eliminated golfing skills in more normal men. And while that closing 74 of his for the funny old total of 290 will not look so dazzling in the record books one day, it should be stated here and now that under the circumstances it was as brilliant as any man ever shot."

Jack's hopes of winning all four majors in the calendar year were duly dashed in The Open at Muirfield, where he was the runner-up to Lee Trevino.

1973 US PGA Championship

History was made at Canterbury Golf Club in Beachwood, Ohio as Nicklaus - playing in his home state - surpassed Walter Hagen's record of 11 professional major victories with his 12th title.

A second successive 68 on Saturday lifted him to the top of the leaderboard and he finished four clear of Crampton, who had also been a runner-up to Nicklaus in the 1972 Masters and U.S. Open.

As the game's dominant player chalked up yet another victory, another golfing great, Snead, produced a remarkable performance at the age of 61, shooting even-par 71s in every round to tie for ninth. Incredibly, he had finished fourth the previous year and would go on to share third in 1974. 

1975 Masters

Nicklaus was five ahead after 36 holes at Augusta in 1975, but entered the final round trailing Tom Weiskopf by one after shooting 73 on Saturday.

A thrilling finale ensued on Sunday, with Nicklaus just about holding off Weiskopf and a charging Johnny Miller to secure his fifth green jacket. A closing 68 was just enough to seal victory on 12 under, with Weiskopf and Miller, who shot 66, both missing makeable putts on the 18th to force a play-off.

1975 US PGA Championship

Poor old Crampton had to settle for a fourth second-placed finish in a major behind Nicklaus as the latter claimed another US PGA crown in Ohio.

At Firestone Country Club in Akron, Nicklaus opened up a four-shot lead through the third round and a closing 71 kept him two clear of Crampton at four under. Weiskopf, one under for 72 holes, was the only other player to break par.

1978 Open Championship

Nicklaus' consistency in The Open was truly astonishing. From 1966 to 1980, he reeled off 15 top-six finishes in a row at golf's oldest major, with six of his seven runner-up placings achieved during this period.

His final victory came at the same place as his previous triumph, St Andrews, as he completed a third career Grand Slam.

A year on from the magical 'Duel in the Sun', where he was edged out by Tom Watson at Turnberry following a captivating battle, Nicklaus entered the final round of the 1978 Open one adrift of the defending champion.

However, Watson swiftly slumped out of contention and Nicklaus was able to taste victory once more, a 69 taking him to seven under and a two-shot triumph.

1980 U.S. Open

Nicklaus was viewed by some as a spent force by the time the 1980 U.S. Open rolled round, having gone almost two years without a PGA Tour win - comfortably the longest barren streak of his career at that point.

Aged 40, he showed there was still plenty left in the tank at Baltusrol.

Both Nicklaus and Weiskopf began the tournament with record-equalling rounds of 63. Weiskopf soon fell away, but Nicklaus prevailed with a tournament scoring record of 272.

The rejuvenated champion had been joined at the top of the leaderboard by Japan's Isao Aoki in round three, but he was not to be denied a 16th major crown.

1980 PGA Championship

Two months later, Nicklaus extended his record with a 17th title and fifth US PGA win. What is more, he did so in dominant fashion.

No other player could break par at Oak Hill, but Nicklaus was on another level as he carded scores of 70, 69, 66 and 69 to end the week seven clear at six under.

His margin of victory remained a record at the PGA until Rory McIlroy triumphed by eight shots in 2012.

1986 Masters

The most famous and unlikely triumph of the set came 34 years ago when Nicklaus thrilled Augusta with a sensational Sunday charge.

Four behind overnight leader Greg Norman heading into the final round, the 46-year-old surged to victory in barely believable style, playing the final 10 holes in seven under to shoot 65.

Nicklaus' memorable birdie at the last triggered an unforgettable putter-raising celebration and ensured he finished one ahead of Norman and Tom Kite at nine under. Seve Ballesteros, who had looked a clear favourite little more than an hour earlier, was a shot further back in fourth.

The first win in any winning streak is often the toughest, and that applied on April 13 1957 when the Boston Celtics first landed an NBA championship, going the distance against the St Louis Hawks.

Jack Nicklaus' glory day at Augusta in 1986 turned out to be the last of his 18th majors, while 11 years later Tiger Woods secured a first-time Green Jacket success.

April 13 was a day for farewells for Kobe Bryant in 2016, when the US basketball great played his final game and made it one to remember.

Here, we take a look back at those memorable moments that happened on this day in history.

1957 - Celtics sink St Louis to launch dynasty

The Boston Celtics won their first 11 championships in a 13-season hot streak, starting here at the expense of the St Louis Hawks.

The 1957 NBA Finals proved nip and tuck, all the way to the climax in Boston.

Games 7 went to double overtime as the Celtics snuck a 125-123 win, Bill Russell with 19 points and a remarkable 32 rebounds in the game as the Red Auerbach era had its lift-off moment.

1986 - Jack is back! Veteran Nicklaus lands final Masters Green Jacket

Jack Nicklaus had not won a major since landing his record-extending 17th big one at the 1980 US PGA Championship. He remained a competitive player but the wins were drying up, just two having come on the PGA Tour in the years since that Oak Hill success before he began his 1986 tilt at The Masters.

It was therefore against almost all expectations that Nicklaus, at the age of 46, won the Green Jacket for a record sixth time, 23 years after his first success at Augusta National.

He was nowhere to be seen on the leaderboard at halfway but gradually crept into contention, and a rollicking charge over the final 10 holes on the Sunday brought him glory, with six birdies, an eagle at 15 and just one dropped shot over that stretch enough to see off Tom Kite, Greg Norman and Seve Ballesteros.

1997 - Woods conquers Augusta, launches Tiger era

Eleven years after Nicklaus last ruled the roost at Georgia's most celebrated course, Tiger Woods' time arrived at Augusta.

A year earlier, Woods had missed the cut in his second Masters appearance as an amateur. But this time he slayed the field, becoming the tournament's youngest champion at the age of 21 and winning by a record 12 shots on an 18-under-par 270.

Woods was by now in the professional ranks, and this performance confirmed the arrival of a new main man on tour.

2016 - Kobe signs off with 60-point flourish

If his Los Angeles Lakers team-mates weren't going to raise their game for the big send-off, Kobe Bryant realised he would have to take charge for his last outing before retirement.

At the end of their wretched season, the Lakers looked spent as they trailed the Utah Jazz by 15 points at one stage. But Bryant wasn't done, and he stepped up to levels not seen for several seasons, bagging a 60-point haul in a 101-96 win for LA.

"Mamba out!" he declared, addressing the fans who in 2020 would mourn the death of their hero in a helicopter crash.

With the 2020 Masters postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic, we have drawn from the well of the tournament's rich history to produce something unique.

From its inception in 1934 right up to last year's stunning triumph for Tiger Woods, this major has always delivered the goods.

While the Augusta course may lie dormant for now, echoes of a glorious past still ring around its verdant fairways and greens.

Using daily leaderboards from a selection of the most memorable editions of the event, we have created a Fantasy Masters.

And here is how a thrilling final round went down...

 

Jordan Spieth (2015) edged out Tiger Woods (1997) on the second play-off hole to win the Fantasy Masters following a thrilling tussle between the two American young guns.

The pair, both just 21, went out in the final group at Augusta as Spieth started Sunday's round with a one-stroke lead over Woods and Raymond Floyd (1976).

Spieth headed to the 18th eyeing a record low score, having become the first player to reach 19 under, but he fluffed his lines with a bogey as Woods capitalised to record a par and force his rival into a play-off.

After both sunk nerveless pars, Spieth stepped it up a gear on the 10th, draining a birdie putt to earn the green jacket following a wire-to-wire triumph.

Spieth racked up a record 28 birdies, finishing an aggregate 12 under on the par fives to underline his clinical brilliance.

Floyd came mighty close to making it a three-way title tussle but, after birdies at 12 and 15, he could not find another gain to force the issue.

Another home hope left to rue a missed opportunity was Patrick Reed (2018), whose 71 was his worst round of the week as he closed on 15 under.

Spain's Seve Ballesteros (1980) squandered an even better chance. Having got to 16 under at the turn following a fine front-nine 33, he ended up signing for an even-par 72 to finish five strokes off the pace.

Ben Crenshaw (1995), a winner here in 1984, took fifth place ahead of Ballesteros and Fred Couples (1992) with a 68.

At the wrong end of the leaderboard, Nick Faldo (1996), Arnold Palmer (1964) and Angel Cabrera (2009) ended on 12 under.

 

WHAT THEY SAID

Jordan Spieth: "It's the most incredible week of my life. This is as great as it gets in our sport. I'm still kind of shock a little bit."

LEADERBOARD

Jordan Spieth (2015) -18 (won on second play-off hole)

Tiger Woods (1997) -18

Raymond Floyd (1976) -17

Patrick Reed (2018) -15

Ben Crenshaw (1995) -14

Seve Ballesteros (1980) -13

Fred Couples (1992) -13

Angel Cabrera (2009) -12

Arnold Palmer (1964) -12

Nick Faldo (1996) -12

*Play-off result determined by average score, rounded to nearest whole number, on 18th and 10th holes across all four rounds

As sporting drama goes, few things are more reliably captivating than the final round of the Masters.

On what would have been Masters Sunday eve, we take a look at how the previous six Augusta finales have played out.

 

2014

Champion: Bubba Watson

Margin of victory: Three shots

Position after R3: T1 (with Jordan Spieth)

Final-round summary: Tournament debutant Spieth threatened to pull off a major shock when he pulled two clear of fellow third-round leader Watson - the 2012 winner - through seven holes on Sunday. However, a four-shot swing over the next two put Watson in charge and he ultimately triumphed with relative comfort. Spieth and Jonas Blixt finished three shots off the pace in second as Watson completed a 69 to secure his second victory at Augusta in three years.

 

2015

Champion: Jordan Spieth

Margin of victory: Four shots

Position after R3: 1 (leading by four)

Final-round summary: Twelve months on from his impressive debut, Spieth was a class above the rest as he cruised to a remarkable, record-breaking success. Only 21 at the time, the Texan had led after each of the first three days and demonstrated supreme composure to retain a healthy advantage over the final 18 holes. Spieth's lead was never less than three on Sunday and he equalled the lowest score in tournament history - matching Woods' aggregate of 270 in 1997 - despite bogeying the final hole. Justin Rose and Phil Mickelson, his nearest challengers, were four shots adrift.

2016

Champion: Danny Willett

Margin of victory: Three shots

Position after R3: T5 (three off the lead)

Final-round summary: Spieth looked set to record another wire-to-wire win and prevail by an even greater margin when he birdied four holes in a row to open up a five-shot lead with nine holes to play. Yet a stunning collapse lay ahead as he followed bogeys at the 10th and 11th by finding the water twice on his way to a staggering quadruple-bogey seven at the short 12th. That nightmare for Spieth left Willett in charge, the Englishman having just birdied the 13th and 14th holes up ahead. Willett could have buckled under the pressure, but he duly picked up another shot on 16 and parred the last two to finish three clear of Spieth and Lee Westwood at five under. 

 

2017

Champion: Sergio Garcia

Margin of victory: Play-off

Position after R3: T1 (with Justin Rose)

Final-round summary: For the second year running, the closing stages of the Masters provided outstanding drama, as Garcia and Rose slugged it out in a titanic duel. So often the nearly man in majors, Garcia was three clear of Rose after five holes but appeared likely to fall short once again as he slipped behind early on the back nine. A miraculous par save at 13 and an eagle at 15 revived the Spaniard, yet he then missed a five-footer for the win on the final hole. Amid increasing tension, Garcia eventually broke his major duck in a play-off, making birdie to Rose's bogey when the pair returned to the 18th. 

 

2018

Champion: Patrick Reed

Margin of victory: Two shots

Position after R3: 1 (leading by three)

Final-round summary: Rory McIlroy was chasing a career Grand Slam and expected to provide the biggest challenge to Reed, who began Sunday three clear at the top of the leaderboard. However, McIlroy slumped to a 74 and it was left to Rickie Fowler and a charging Spieth to threaten Reed's position. Spieth put together a stunning 64, but came up two short as Reed pipped Fowler by one with a closing 71 and earned his maiden major title.

2019

Champion: Tiger Woods

Margin of victory: One shot

Position after R3: T2 (two off the lead)

Final-round summary: Stormy weather meant an early start and groups of three, with players going off the first and 10th tees. Former Open champion and 2018 Ryder Cup hero Francesco Molinari's bid for Masters glory was derailed when he found the water at 15, a hole where Tiger Woods carded a birdie to assume the outright lead. Another gain followed at 16 and the likes of Xander Schauffele, Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka could not keep pace. A bogey at the last was enough to secure Woods' fifth green jacket, 14 years after the previous one.

With the 2020 Masters postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic, we have drawn from the well of the tournament's rich history to produce something unique.

From its inception in 1934 right up to last year's stunning triumph for Tiger Woods, this major has always delivered the goods.

While the Augusta course may lay dormant for now, echoes of a glorious past still ring around its verdant fairways and greens.

Using daily leaderboards from a selection of the most memorable editions of the event, we have created a Fantasy Masters.

And here is how a thrilling third round went down...

 

Tiger Woods (1997) carded a stunning 65 to move to within one stroke of Fantasy Masters leader Jordan Spieth (2015).

The young duo, both just 21, face stiff competition from Raymond Floyd (1976), who sits level with Woods on 15 under after recovering from a double-bogey six at the 11th to sign for a 70.

Seve Ballesteros (1980) cut the gap to the summit from five shots to three with a 68, leaving the Spaniard one behind Patrick Reed (2018) following the American's excellent 67.

Woods, who shot a 66 on Friday, went one better in round three, where he piled the pressure on Spieth, who is eyeing a wire-to-wire triumph.

Having started the day six shots behind Spieth, Woods was quick out of the blocks and made the first of four front-nine gains on the second hole.

He put the seal on a fine Augusta outing by birdieing the last to conclude a blemish-free round that stood in stark contrast to Spieth's scorecard.

Spieth's 70 saw him struggle badly on the par fours, where he was three over – seven shots worse than his first-round effort – and a run of four birdies in five holes was largely undone by a a bogey at 14 and a double at 17.

A field shorn of the likes of Jack Nicklaus (1965) and Gary Player (1978) following the cut is now tightly packed heading into the final round, although Nick Faldo (1996) slipped well off the pace.

The Englishman, who won back-to-back Masters titles in 1989 and 1990, posted a scruffy 73 which included a double bogey and five other dropped shots, salvaged slightly by a birdie at the last.

Arnold Palmer (1964), who only narrowly made the weekend, was one of four players to register a 69, along with Fred Couples (1992), Angel Cabrera (2009) and Ben Crenshaw (1995).

 

LEADERBOARD

Jordan Spieth (2015) -16

Tiger Woods (1997) -15

Raymond Floyd (1976) -15

Patrick Reed (2018) -14

Seve Ballesteros (1980) -13

Fred Couples (1992) -11

Angel Cabrera (2009) -11

Arnold Palmer (1964) -10

Ben Crenshaw (1995) -10

Nick Faldo (1996) -7

With the 2020 Masters postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic, we have drawn from the well of the tournament's rich history to produce something unique.

From its inception in 1934 right up to last year's stunning triumph for Tiger Woods, this major has always delivered the goods.

While the Augusta course may lay dormant for now, echoes of a glorious past still ring around its verdant fairways and greens.

Using daily leaderboards from a selection of the most memorable editions of the event, we have created a Fantasy Masters.

And here is how a thrilling second round went down...

 

Jack Nicklaus (1965) remarkably failed to make the cut as Jordan Spieth (2015) and Raymond Floyd (1976) pulled clear of the chasing pack on day two of the Fantasy Masters.

Spieth, who came up just short of an Augusta course record when he shot an opening 64, carded a 66 on Friday to maintain his one-stroke lead over Floyd.

But there was a huge shock lower down the leaderboard as Nicklaus, two years on from claiming the green jacket, fluffed his lines on Amen Corner to ensure he will miss the weekend.

Nicklaus bogeyed the 11th, 12th and 13th, ensuring his back-to-back gains at the 15th and 16th came in a fruitless effort.

He was far from the only big name to drop out of the tournament, with Tom Watson (1977) and Gary Player (1978) also missing the cut, along with Ben Hogan (1953), Phil Mickelson (2010) and Charl Schwartzel (2011).

The big movers were Tiger Woods (1997) and Patrick Reed (2018), who both signed for a 66, leaving them on eight and nine under respectively.

Spieth and Floyd's relative comfort at the summit owes much to the fact Seve Ballesteros (1980) could not keep the pressure on, despite a late rally.

After slipping below the cut mark with six holes left, the Spaniard birdied four of the next five to end the day third, but five shots from the top.

Arnold Palmer (1964) survived an even closer call with the cut line, the 34-year-old keeping his nerve to make a decisive three on the par-four 18th.

Other players who kept their hopes alive were Nick Faldo (1996), Fred Couples (1992), Angel Cabrera (2009) and Ben Crenshaw (1995).

 

WHAT THEY SAID

Paul Azinger: "He [Tiger Woods] didn't miss a putt inside 10 feet. If he's going to drive it great and not miss a putt inside 10 feet, he is going to beat you."

Gary Player: "One of the things I am is an eternal optimist. I was playing excellent golf, and I hadn't made any putts. But you have to keep on aiming at them."

 

LEADERBOARD

Jordan Spieth (2015) -14

Raymond Floyd (1976) -13

Seve Ballesteros (1980) -9

Patrick Reed (2018) -9

Tiger Woods (1997) -8

Nick Faldo (1996) -8

Fred Couples (1992) -8

Angel Cabrera (2009) -8

Arnold Palmer (1964) -7

Ben Crenshaw (1995) -7

-CUT-CUT-CUT-CUT-CUT-

Jack Nicklaus (1965) -6

Phil Mickelson (2010) -6

Tom Watson (1977) -5

Ben Hogan (1953) -5

Charl Schwartzel (2011) -4

Gary Player (1978) Even

With the 2020 Masters postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic, we have drawn from the well of the tournament's rich history to produce something unique.

From its inception in 1934 right up to last year's stunning triumph for Tiger Woods, this major has always delivered the goods.

While the Augusta course may lay dormant for now, echoes of a glorious past still ring around its verdant fairways and greens.

Using daily leaderboards from a selection of the most memorable editions of the event, we have created a Fantasy Masters.

And here is how a thrilling opening round went down...

 

Jordan Spieth (2015) leads a star-studded field after shooting a stunning 64 in the opening round of the Fantasy Masters.

The American sits proudly atop a leaderboard dominated by his compatriots, sinking nine birdies to reach eight under at Augusta.

Spieth, 21, was eyeing a course record until a bogey at the 15th slowed his progress, although he was not too downbeat.

"I wasn't aware what the course record was here, let alone that it actually would have been the lowest round in major championship history. So that's a little frustrating," he said, with Nick Price's 63 safe for now.

"But I'm certainly okay with the day."

However, he faces pressure from Raymond Floyd (1976), who birdied each of the four par fives to stay within one stroke of the summit.

Seve Ballesteros (1980) is flying the flag for Europe, the Spaniard taking a typically bold approach in his 66, putting him one ahead of Jack Nicklaus (1965) and Phil Mickelson (2010).

A scruffy start left Tiger Woods (1997) well off the pace at the turn, sitting four over, but he surged on the way home – highlighted by an eagle three at 15, where Spieth faltered – to sign for a lop-sided 70, taking 40 shots on the front nine and 30 on the back.

Argentina's Angel Cabrera (2009), winner of the 2007 U.S. Open, is in the frame after carding a 68, putting him a solitary stroke clear of a five-man chasing pack consisting of Arnold Palmer (1964), Nick Faldo (1996), Fred Couples (1992), Patrick Reed (2018) and Charl Schwartzel (2011).

Meanwhile, Ben Hogan (1953), Ben Crenshaw (1995) and Tom Watson (1977) matched Woods' score, with Gary Player (1978) propping up the pile as the only man failing to shoot an under-par score.

 

WHAT THEY SAID

Tiger Woods: "I was pretty hot going to the 10th tee. I couldn't keep the ball in the fairway. I couldn't attack the pin. I knew what I was doing wrong. I was in such a bad position at the top of the backswing, I was coming off the ball. But after I realised that, it was just a matter of trusting the motion."

Patrick Reed: "It was one of those steady days where you go out and play normal golf and let the birdies come to you. Around this place, pars are good. I was able to plop myself around and when I had an opportunity I capitalised on it."

LEADERBOARD

Jordan Spieth (2015) -8

Raymond Floyd (1976) -7

Seve Ballesteros (1980) -6

Jack Nicklaus (1965) -5 

Phil Mickelson (2010) -5

Angel Cabrera (2009) -4

Arnold Palmer (1964) -3

Nick Faldo (1996) -3

Fred Couples (1992) -3

Patrick Reed (2018) -3 

Charl Schwartzel (2011) -3

Tiger Woods (1997) -2

Ben Hogan (1953) -2

Ben Crenshaw (1995) -2

Tom Watson (1977) -2

Gary Player (1978) Even

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