Eli Manning and Ben Roethlisberger have led the tributes to Philip Rivers after the Indianapolis Colts quarterback announced his NFL retirement.

Rivers, 39, spent the first 16 years of his career with the Chargers, initially in San Diego and later in Los Angeles, before joining the Colts for the 2020 season.

He led the Colts back to the playoffs with an 11-5 record and the team narrowly lost to the Buffalo Bills in the Wildcard Round in what proved to be his final game.

Rivers finishes his 17-year career ranked fifth all-time for both passing yards (63,440) and touchdown passes (421).

While Manning and Roethlisberger – the two other prominent quarterbacks drafted in 2004 – won two Super Bowls apiece, Rivers never made it to the big game.

But they insist it does not detract from his magnificent accomplishments.

Former New York Giants QB Manning wrote on Twitter: "Congrats to Philip on an outstanding career. 

"It was fun to watch my fellow Qb from 2004 draft class compete these past 17 years. Enjoy the next phase."

Pittsburgh Steelers QB Roethlisberger, whose own future is uncertain, added: "Philip, what a career! 

"An amazing competitor, winner and family man. It has been fun to compete against you and watch you do your thing for so many years. 

"I know countless kids have been inspired by you and will benefit from your coaching and football knowledge in the future. God bless!"

Colts head coach Frank Reich had previously said he believed Rivers had more left in the tank.

"Philip is one of the fiercest competitors and most loyal teammates that our game has ever seen," he said after Rivers' announcement. 

"His unwavering conviction as a leader and elite intelligence contributed to his Hall of Fame football career. 

"Philip made our game better and the National Football League was fortunate to have him.

"I wish Philip, Tiffany and the entire Rivers family the best and thank them for their contributions to our organization and community. 

"I am anxious to see Philip trade his helmet for the headset and do what he's always done best – bring his passion to the game of football and make others better."

Two of Rivers' prominent former Chargers pass catchers, Keenan Allen and Hunter Henry, were also quick to send him their gratitude on social media.

Allen wrote: "Husband, Father, Friend, Role Model, Professional, Warrior, Leader!

"Glad that I was blessed to be apart of your career. Showed up everyday like it was your last and never took any moment for granted!"

While Henry added: "Congrats stud. Insane career. 

"Thankful for everything you have done for me in my career. You were a true inspiration. Enjoy retirement stud!"

Houston Texans icon JJ Watt called Rivers "one of the smartest I’ve ever played against and a hell of a competitor".

Minnesota Vikings QB Kirk Cousins, meanwhile, said Rivers' career was worthy of a place in the Hall of Fame, labelling him "an example to follow as a QB, a team leader, a Dad, and a man of faith".

Peyton Manning went one up on Tom Brady with quick-witted jibes before the first tee shot was struck ahead of "The Match".

The start of the all-star charity contest – arranged to raise funds for COVID-19 relief efforts – in which Manning has teamed up with Tiger Woods to face Brady and Phil Mickelson was delayed due to the wet weather in South Florida on Sunday.

When the quartet took to the range it was Manning who fired an early blow when asked who his caddie might have been if the quartet had someone to carry their bags at Medalist Golf Club.

With Tampa Bay Buccaneers new boy Brady in earshot lining up a practice shot, Manning replied to a reporter: "Do you bring Eli [Manning, his brother]? Could do that.

"Do you bring Nick Foles? Maybe."

Brady turned out and replied: "That's a cheap shot."

Manning was not finished yet, adding: "I was thinking maybe Bill Belichick ... just to see how that kind of would have worked."

Woods, wearing his famous Sunday red, and Mickelson ensured the first hole was halved after their legendary quarterback team-mates were wayward from the tee in the rain with concerns that a storm may be on the way.

Eli Manning was surprised to see his former Super Bowl rival Tom Brady join the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and feels the quarterback will have a tough task adapting.

Following his retirement at the end of the 2019 season, New York Giants great Manning had the opportunity to observe a dramatic free agency at his position.

Brady, the man he beat in two Super Bowls, opted to leave the New England Patriots after 20 years that had produced nine AFC Championships and six Vince Lombardi trophies.

Manning was shocked Brady opted to part with Bill Belichick and hopes the quality of the Bucs' receivers can go at least some way towards easing the 42-year-old's transition.

Brady adapting to life with the Bucs has been made more difficult by the coronavirus impacting offseason activities.

"I was just surprised," Manning said of Brady's move to SiriusXM NFL Radio.

"So much success and still having success and playing at a high level and making playoffs and everything he has done there in New England, [I'm surprised] that there would be a departure. 

"I think it's gonna be tough for him, just the fact he can't be doing everything he wants to be doing with the team and getting ready.

"It will be interesting how it all plays out - how quickly he can just adjust to a new organisation, new players and a new offense, all those new things, especially with the limited timing he's gonna have being with them.

"When you have got talented receivers it makes it easier to get on the same page because they are getting open."

One of the other top QB storylines came in last month's NFL draft, as the Green Bay Packers controversially traded up to select Utah State's Jordan Love in the first round, picking an apparent successor to franchise icon Aaron Rodgers.

Manning is sure Rodgers, who had previously spoken of his desire to finish his career at Green Bay in his 40s, would not have liked the move.

"It was a little bit of deja vu and kinda how it happened with Brett Favre," said Manning.

"When Aaron Rodgers was drafted to Green Bay, obviously they didn't trade up, but they took a quarterback in the first round when Favre was still playing well and had years left of playing. 

"I'm sure Brett wasn't real fond of that happening and I'm sure Aaron wasn't real fond of it happening, especially after going 13-3 and playing good football."

It is one of the most awkward NFL Draft images of all time.

Eli Manning, stood next to then NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue, holding up a San Diego Chargers jersey he never had any intention of wearing.

Manning, the top pick of the 2004 draft, made clear his desire not to play for San Diego, and his refusal to do so led to him being swiftly traded to the New York Giants for fellow quarterback Philip Rivers.

Friday marks 16 years to the day of that tumultuous first round, which will forever live in NFL infamy.

But Manning is far from the only sports star to refuse to play for his team.

Here we look at five others to have taken that stance.

Geoffrey Boycott 1974-77

One of English cricket's greatest batsmen, Boycott went into self-enforced exile from the international game for reasons that remain unclear.

Boycott has since stated a loss of appetite for Test cricket was behind that decision, but others point to Mike Denness and Tony Greig's appointments to the England captaincy.

The observation has been made that Boycott left the England set-up during the peak of the careers of several legendary fast bowlers including Dennis Lillee and Michael Holding.

Boycott has taken a dim view of such comments and he made his return in 1977 against Australia and in a display of the obduracy that defined his career, batted on each of the five days at Trent Bridge, a feat only three other England players have subsequently emulated.

Dominique Wilkins 1982

Having starred at the University of Georgia, Wilkins was unhappy at being selected third overall in the NBA Draft by the Utah Jazz.

Unwilling to play for the Jazz, who at the time were blighted by cash-flow problems, Wilkins was subsequently traded to the Atlanta Hawks months later.

In exchange for Wilkins, the Jazz received John Drew, Freeman Williams, and $1million, but the deal was one they would live to regret.

Wilkins went on to become a nine-time All-Star, while Drew and Williams played only a combined four seasons for Utah.

John Elway 1983

A sought-after prospect in both American football and baseball, Elway leveraged his appeal to the latter to get out of playing for the NFL's then Baltimore Colts.

Elway was said to be reluctant to play for the Colts and his father cautioned him against working under head coach Frank Kush.

He took the advice of his dad and, when the Colts selected him first overall, reacted by saying: "As I stand here right now, I'm playing baseball."

That was a legitimate option for Elway, who had been drafted in the second round of the 1981 MLB Draft by the New York Yankees.

A Major League Baseball career never came to pass, though, as the Colts agreed to trade Elway to the Denver Broncos for offensive lineman Chris Hinton, backup quarterback Mark Herrmann and a first-round pick in 1984.

Elway would go on to become one of the greatest quarterbacks in NFL history and won two Super Bowls with the Broncos. His concerns about the Colts proved justified, as they moved to Indianapolis in 1984 and continued to struggle until the 1990s.

Bo Jackson 1986

One man who did play in both MLB and the NFL, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers missed out on one of the most dynamic athletes in American sports history despite selecting Jackson first overall.

Jackson refused to play for the Buccaneers as a visit to their facilities proved to be against NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) rules when Tampa Bay had insisted it was permitted.

As a result, Jackson missed the rest of his final college baseball season and elected to re-enter the draft the following year while spending 1986 playing for MLB's Kansas City Royals.

He was selected in the seventh round of the 1987 draft by the Oakland Raiders, whose owner Al Davis permitted him to play both sports.

The 1989 All-Star Game MVP, Jackson's achievements in baseball surpassed what he did on the football field, with a hip injury meaning he played only four seasons in the NFL.

Still, for the Bucs it was a case of what might have been.

Pierre van Hooijdonk 1998

Having returned from the World Cup to find promises of squad strengthening had not been met, Nottingham Forest striker Pierre van Hooijdonk asked for a transfer.

That request was rejected, leading Van Hooijdonk, furious at the sale of strike partner Kevin Campbell and adamant he had previously been told he could leave if he wished, went on strike, keeping fit by training with former club NAC Breda.

Forest refused to entertain offers for Van Hooijdonk, leading to an impasse that lasted until November, when he finally returned.

He scored six goals but was unable to keep Forest in the Premier League, as they finished bottom and made an immediate return to the second tier.

Their relegation led to Van Hooijdonk getting his wish in the form of a move to Vitesse, and spells with Benfica, Feyenoord and Fenerbahce followed.

Heading into the 1998 NFL Draft, the Indianapolis Colts had what was deemed to be a tricky choice to make.

Armed with the first overall pick, new team president Bill Polian had two quarterbacks to choose from: Peyton Manning – the son of a former NFL player who starred at the University of Tennessee – or Ryan Leaf, the big man with a strong arm who had decided to leave Washington State a year early to enter the league.

History, of course, tells us the Colts made the correct call.

Manning spent 14 seasons in Indianapolis, his hugely successful spell with the team including leading them to glory in Super Bowl XLI. His jersey number (18) was retired by the franchise, while there is a statue of him at the team's Lucas Oil Stadium.

The San Diego Chargers, meanwhile, claimed Leaf at two. Their marriage did not run so smoothly – or last too long (three seasons, to be precise). He played just 25 games in a career that also included a stop in Dallas, throwing 14 touchdowns and 36 interceptions, and is regarded as one of – if not the – biggest draft busts.

But what if Leaf had gone first instead? Let's start at the beginning…

 

THE COLTS

Having the first pick was the ideal building block for Polian, who was always going to hand new head coach Jim Mora a rookie QB to work with.

Manning started from the outset with the Colts. There were early teething problems and he finished his debut season with a 3-13 record, throwing more interceptions (28) than touchdowns (26).

However, the chance to learn on the job aided his development. The Colts went on to make the playoffs in the next two seasons and while 2001 was not so successful, a 6-10 campaign led to the arrival of Tony Dungy as head coach and, well, the rest is history.

Whether Leaf would have developed in the same circumstances has to be considered doubtful with how his career panned out, but Indianapolis would have at least afforded him time in which to prove himself.

They also had two rather useful pieces to help, as a running back by the name of Marshall Faulk and a wide receiver called Marvin Harrison were already on the roster.

Had Leaf still flamed out in a similar timeframe with the Colts – it should be pointed out he missed his second season in San Diego through injury - they may well have used the 2001 draft to find a replacement. The Chargers did exactly that, using the 32nd pick on Drew Brees.

THE CHARGERS

Here is where an alternative NFL timeline gets seriously interesting.

Manning as a Charger may not have blossomed in time to keep head coach Kevin Gilbride in a job – he was fired midway through the 1998 season, his second at the helm – but he may well have been the key to keeping the team in San Diego.

Owner Dean Spanos moved the Chargers to Los Angeles after an unsuccessful attempt to get a new stadium built. A failure to secure tax-payer funding led to relocation in 2017.

Surely, though, the presence of Manning could have made a difference. On-field success - perhaps even a Super Bowl triumph like the one the Colts enjoyed - could have led to them getting the backing required to stay put.

Instead, L.A. is now home, though they have so far struggled in competition with the Rams to attract fans. There have even been rumours that the Chargers could move again soon, this time overseas to become the NFL's permanent residents in London.

And what of Brees? Manning's presence would have made picking another QB a waste of draft resources. In 2001, the team to next take a player at the position after the Chargers were the Cowboys, meaning Drew could well have gone on to become a star in Dallas instead.

THE 2004 DRAFT

Of course, there is another Manning whose career would have changed if you take a sliding doors approach to the '98 draft.

After life with Leaf failed to pan out, the Chargers had better luck with Brees before then moving on to Philip Rivers.

However, they selected Peyton's younger brother Eli with the first pick in 2004, rather than Rivers, even though the former Ole Miss quarterback never had any intention of playing for them.

Eli ended up in New York with the Giants in a trade that saw Rivers, who was drafted at four, head in the opposite direction. The next QB taken that year? Ben Roethlisberger, who went to the Pittsburgh Steelers at 11. The Buffalo Bills also used their first-round pick on the position, opting for J.P. Losman after moving up to 22.

Yet had Peyton's place been in San Diego, several notable signal callers selected early in 2004 could have ended up in different locations to begin their pro careers.

Eli Manning says he is "at peace" with his decision to retire as he had no plans to represent anyone other than the New York Giants.

The Giants confirmed on Wednesday that the two-time Super Bowl-winning quarterback would retire from the NFL, ending a 16-year spell with the team.

Manning joined the Giants in a controversial draft-day trade after being selected by the San Diego Chargers in 2004 and led them to Super Bowl success in 2007 and 2011, both victories coming against the New England Patriots.

Plans are in place to retire Manning's number 10 jersey and the 39-year-old has not ruled out returning to the MetLife Stadium in a coaching capacity, but first he wants time to reflect on his career.

"I'll take some time just to figure out how I want to spend these next years first," he said at Friday's retirement press conference.

"This sport has very few real farewells. It's impossible to explain the satisfaction, and actually the joy, I've experienced being a Giant.

"From the very first moment, I did it my way. I couldn't be someone other than who I am. 

"Undoubtedly I would've made the fans, the media and even the front office more comfortable if I was a more rah-rah guy. 

"But that's not me. Ultimately I choose to believe that my team-mates and the fans learned to appreciate that. They knew what they got was pure unadulterated Eli."

Manning split opinion throughout his career and bows out with 57,023 passing yards, 366 touchdowns and 244 interceptions.

Asked why now was the right time to announce his retirement, he added: "It was important for me to retire as a Giant. It was the right decision. 

"I know it is and I'm at peace with it. I think that's what has made this day a little bit easier.

"Wellington Mara used to say, 'Once a Giant, always a Giant.' For me, it's only a giant."

Giants co-owner John Mara also spoke at Friday's ceremony and confirmed Manning will be inducted into their Ring of Honor next season.

"This is certainly a day of very mixed emotions for us," he said. "It's sad in one sense because we're seeing the end of an incredible playing career and saying goodbye to someone who has been everything you could ask a player to be both on and off the field for the last 16 years. 

"Yet we're also very happy to that we get to be here to celebrate that incredible career and we're also able to witness one of the greatest players in franchise history be able to leave the game on his own terms, having played his whole career with the Giants, something that doesn't always happen in this business.

"If anybody deserved that opportunity it's Eli Manning. The last 16 years Eli has meant so much to all of us here with the giants and our fans. 

"We all know about the two Super Bowl MVPs and all of the great performances on the field, but just as important was the way he conducted himself on and off the field as the consummate professional, always with dignity always with class."

Eli Manning, the two-time Super Bowl-winning quarterback of the New York Giants, is to retire from the NFL.

Manning joined the Giants in 2004 in one of the more controversial moments in the history of the NFL Draft. Originally selected first overall by the San Diego Chargers despite his insistence he did not want to play for them, Manning was quickly traded to the Giants in exchange for Philip Rivers, whom New York had selected with the fourth pick.

He went on to lead the Giants to Super Bowl triumphs in the 2007 and 2011 seasons, both of his victories coming against the New England Patriots and his first marking arguably the greatest upset in Super Bowl history with Bill Belichick's team having gone undefeated in the regular season.

Despite twice winning the Lombardi Trophy, Manning has remained one of the more divisive figures in the NFL, with the merits of his career the subject of great debate as his skills have declined in the latter years of his career.

However, the Giants are in no doubt as to his place in the history of the storied franchise.

"For 16 seasons, Eli Manning defined what it is to be a New York Giant both on and off the field," Giants president and chief executive officer John Mara said.

"Eli is our only two-time Super Bowl MVP and one of the very best players in our franchise's history. He represented our franchise as a consummate professional with dignity and accountability.

"It meant something to Eli to be the Giants quarterback, and it meant even more to us. We are beyond grateful for his contributions to our organisation and look forward to celebrating his induction into the Giants Ring of Honour in the near future."

"We are proud to have called Eli Manning our quarterback for so many years," added Steve Tisch, Giants chairman and executive vice-president.

"Eli was driven to always do what was best for the team. Eli leaves a timeless legacy with two Super Bowl titles on the field and his philanthropic work off the field, which has inspired and impacted so many people.

"We are sincerely thankful for everything Eli has given our team and community. He will always be a Giant among Giants."

Manning, who will announce his retirement on Friday, will end his career with 57,023 career passing yards, 366 touchdowns and 244 interceptions. He also scored seven rushing touchdowns.

Controversially benched for one game in 2017, Manning started every game of a 2018 season in which the Giants went 5-11. He started the first two games of 2019 before being benched for rookie Daniel Jones.

An injury to Jones forced Manning back into the line-up for two further starts and he followed a defeat to the Philadelphia Eagles with a victory over the Miami Dolphins in Week 15 to finish with 117 wins and 117 losses, a fitting record for a quarterback who split opinion throughout his career.

Eli Manning, the two-time Super Bowl-winning quarterback of the New York Giants, is to retire from the NFL.

Eli Manning said "everything's an option" but the New York Giants quarterback is not interested in spending another NFL season as backup to Daniel Jones, with retirement a possibility.

Manning started the first two games of the season, however, the 38-year-old star took a backseat to rookie QB Jones in New York.

A two-time Super Bowl champion and MVP, Manning made four appearances in total this term, while he was given a standing ovation in likely his last start at MetLife Stadium against the Miami Dolphins on December 15.

With Manning's contract expiring and the Giants searching for a new head coach after Pat Shurmur's sacking, the future is uncertain for the four-time Pro Bowler.

"Everything's an option," Manning told reporters on Monday when asked if he was planning to retire.

"I haven't [made a decision]. I'm gonna think about it and I'm gonna just dwell on it, talk to my family. Figure out what's best for me and us and what I want to do going forward ...

"I don't have no plans. Just sit on it and hopefully have that answer on what I want to do and what my next steps are. I don't want to linger around, I'm going try to make it as soon as possible, so I'll think upon it a bunch over these next days and weeks and try to figure out what I want to do."

Asked if he would consider being a backup again in New York, Manning replied: "I doubt it. I doubt it. Backing up is not real fun… I think I can still play."

On the possibly of turning to coaching, Manning added: "I felt like I was kind of a coach this year.

"I didn't enjoy it that much. I guess, you know, I kinda take it back. I am coaching my third-grade basketball team, my daughter [is on it]. I'm the assistant, but I take it pretty serious and I'm enjoying that, so I will consider some coaching jobs."

Daniel Jones has been named as the New York Giants' starting quarterback for Week 16, potentially spelling the end of Eli Manning's 16th and likely final season with the team.

Rookie Jones took the starting job from two-time Super Bowl champion Manning after Week 2, before he suffered a moderate high ankle sprain against the Green Bay Packers earlier this month.

Manning, 38, returned under center in a defeat to the Philadelphia Eagles and a win over the Miami Dolphins.

The veteran star threw for two touchdowns in each game, along with three interceptions against the Dolphins.

But his stint back in the team is seemingly over after Jones was a full participant in practice heading into Sunday's meeting with the Washington Redskings.

Coach Pat Shurmur confirmed on Friday that Jones would be starting in Washington, the Giants stated on their website.

The surprise sixth overall draft pick has thrown 18 touchdowns and 11 picks over 11 games - 10 starts - for the 3-11 Giants, who finish the season at home to the Eagles.

Manning, reverting to a back-up role, will be an unrestricted free agent in 2020 if he decides to carry on playing.

New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning does not know what the future holds following a "special" win over the Miami Dolphins.

Veteran Manning, 38, threw a pair of touchdown passes as the Giants beat the Dolphins 36-20 in NFL action at MetLife Stadium on Sunday.

In potentially his final home start for the Giants, Manning received a standing ovation after exiting the game with less than two minutes remaining – New York going on to snap a nine-match losing streak.

"Obviously, I don't know what the future is. I don't know what lies next week, let alone down the road," said Manning, who was replaced as starter by rookie Daniel Jones from Week 3.

"Obviously, the support and the fans, their ovation, chanting my name from the first snap to the end, I appreciate that. I appreciate them always and all my team-mates coming up to me. It's a special day, a special win and one I'll remember."

A two-time Super Bowl winner and MVP, Manning had his family in attendance and he added: "It's special. I think it's special that my kids get to come and watch some games.

"I don't remember my dad playing at all. He retired when I was four years old. My brothers have memories. They always kind of talked about it, in the locker room, around games and I don't remember.

"So, I try to bring my kids around as much as possible, bring them to some games. I know my youngest son won't remember any of it, but we'll at least have a picture to show him one day."

"I tried not to get too emotional just because we still have a couple football games left," Manning continued. "I know I'll still be back in the stadium. I don't know if I'll play that day, but I know I'll get to run out one more time at least.

"But still excited. Excited for the win and an honour if it is the last one playing here where I'm starting and getting a win. Try to enjoy it and take it in for a moment."

Veteran quarterback Eli Manning will make potentially his final home start for the New York Giants on Sunday against the Miami Dolphins.

Rookie Daniel Jones, who took over from Manning as the starter from Week 3, will miss a second successive game with an ankle injury.

That means 38-year-old Manning will be under center at MetLife Stadium for the 2-11 Giants' Week 15 clash with the 3-10 Dolphins.

Two-time Super Bowl champion Manning, the first overall pick in the 2004 NFL Draft, is in his 16th and likely final season with the Giants, who finish the campaign at home against the Philadelphia Eagles.

Manning has played in 235 regular-season games for New York, throwing for 56,740 yards and 364 touchdowns, while also leading the franchise to victories over the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLII and XLVI.

The Giants drafted Jones in the first round of the 2019 NFL Draft to take over from Manning, who will be an unrestricted free agent in 2020 if he decides to carry on playing.

In three starts this season, Manning has gone 71-of-119 passing for 759 yards, four touchdowns and two interceptions.

Two of those scores came on Monday in a 23-17 overtime loss to the Eagles.

Manning will be without Evan Engram on Sunday, though, with the tight end ruled out for a fifth successive game due to a foot injury.

The Philadelphia Eagles rallied to beat the New York Giants 23-17 in overtime and keep their postseason hopes alive.

In a gritty performance in Philadelphia on Monday, Zach Ertz caught a two-yard touchdown in OT to secure victory as the Eagles overcame a 17-3 deficit.

The victory snapped a three-game losing streak and saw the Eagles (6-7) move level with rivals the Dallas Cowboys (6-7) for the NFC East lead.

In a crucial game for the Eagles, it was Eli Manning and the Giants who made a strong start at Lincoln Financial Field.

Making his first start since Week 2, Giants quarterback and two-time Super Bowl MVP Manning threw two touchdowns to Darius Slayton.

After a scoreless first quarter, Manning – who finished 15 of 30 for 203 yards and two TDs – threw a 35-yard pass to Slayton before connecting with the rookie again as half-time approached.

Fans booed the Eagles as they headed into the locker room at half-time, with Philadelphia's only score a Jake Elliott field goal.

The Eagles dug deep in the second half – quarterback Carson Wentz leading the rally as the hosts reduced the Giants' lead to 17-10 entering the final quarter.

Wentz helped level the contest at 17-17 when he found Ertz on a two-yard pass with less than two minutes remaining in regulation, before the pair combined again in additional time.

Wentz ended the game 33-of-50 for 325 yards and two touchdowns, while he also had five carries.

Eli Manning will start for the New York Giants against the Philadelphia Eagles in Week 14 after Daniel Jones was officially ruled out of the game.

Quarterback Jones - who took over as the Giants' starter in Week 3, leading the team to back-to-back victories in his first two NFL outings - has not practiced all week due to a high ankle sprain.

The rookie suffered the injury in the 31-13 home loss to the Green Bay Packers last Sunday, a result that extended New York's losing streak to eight games.

Manning will now make his 245th start for the franchise in an all-NFC East battle in Philadelphia on Monday.

"He looks good. He's had a good week. He always has a good look in his eye," Giants offensive coordinator Mike Shula said on Friday.

The two-time Super Bowl winner will be aided in his return by the availability of Golden Tate. The wide receiver is set to feature after clearing concussion protocol, but tight end Evan Engram is again out.

They will also be without Jabrill Peppers; the safety has been placed on injured reserve, bringing an end to his campaign, due to a back injury. 

Sean Chandler - signed off the practice squad - takes Peppers' place on the roster, while the fit-again Kareem Martin replaces fellow linebacker Chris Peace, who - like Peppers - is also done for the season.

Eli Manning is "very likely" to start at quarterback for the New York Giants against the Philadelphia Eagles due to Daniel Jones' injury, the team have announced.

Two-time Super Bowl champion Manning, 38, began the season under center for the Giants but lost his place after Week 2 to rookie Jones, a surprise sixth overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft.

Jones led New York to back-to-back wins in his first two professional games, but the team have lost eight straight since, falling to 2-10.

The 22-year-old has passed for 18 touchdowns and 11 interceptions this year, along with two rushing scores.

But coach Pat Shurmur revealed on Wednesday, according to the Giants' official website, Jones has a moderate high ankle sprain.

Manning is therefore in line for a return against NFC East rivals the Eagles on Monday, having passed for two touchdowns and two interceptions through two games in 2019.

Jones is in a walking boot and did not practice on Wednesday, having seemingly suffered the injury in an incident involving the Green Bay Packers' Preston Smith early on Sunday.

He finished the 31-13 defeat, completing 20 of 37 passes for a touchdown and three interceptions.

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