The Davis Cup and Fed Cup have both been postponed until 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic, it was confirmed on Friday.

Due to be hosted in Madrid, the Davis Cup Finals were supposed to have taken place from November 23-29, but following a three-month review it was deemed too challenging to stage this year.

Organisers Kosmos Tennis and the International Tennis Federation (ITF) pointed to the fact more than 90 athletes would have been expected to be involved, while the international event attracts thousands of fans, officials, staff and other stakeholders from across the globe, with many countries at differing stages of the pandemic.

With the competition now set to begin on November 22, 2021, it was confirmed the 18 teams that have already qualified for the men's global team tournament will have their places secured, while the draw for the finals remains the same.

Kosmos president and Barcelona defender Gerard Pique said: "It's a huge disappointment for all of us that the Davis Cup Finals will not be held in 2020.

"We don't know how the situation will develop in each qualified nation, or if restrictions in Spain will remain sufficiently eased, as such it is impossible to predict the situation in November and guarantee the safety of those travelling to Madrid.

"This postponement has no long-term bearing on our collective ambitions for the Davis Cup. The ITF and Kosmos Tennis look forward to delivering an outstanding competition in 2021, when it is safe and feasible to do so."

The women's equivalent, the Fed Cup, has also unsurprisingly hit a similar stumbling block and will now take place from April 13-18.

Budapest remains its location and, much like the Davis Cup, the teams that have already qualified will retain their places. The Fed Cup Play-offs will go ahead at the start of February.

Neither postponement has come as a surprise, particularly following the chaos caused by the Adria Tour event earlier this month.

Organised by world number one Novak Djokovic and played across locations in Serbia and Croatia, the event did not adhere to social distancing procedures and attracted large crowds. Legs in Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina were ultimately postponed due to COVID-19 concerns.

Several of the marquee players ended up testing positive for the virus, including Djokovic himself, Grigor Dimitrov, Borna Coric and Viktor Troicki, and the event was met with widespread criticism.

Gerard Pique is "pessimistic" about the hosting of the 2020 Davis Cup due to Spain's restrictions on fans attending sporting events as a result of the COVID-19 crisis.

The Barcelona defender's investment group Kosmos acquired the rights to tennis' international team competition in 2018.

Last year, the Davis Cup began a new week-long format that was won by Spain in Madrid.

The Spanish capital is due to host the Davis Cup again this year in November, but Pique cast doubt as to whether it will go ahead.

Speaking to Movistar, he said: "I'm a bit pessimistic, to have the Davis Cup without fans is difficult.

"There is a lot of uncertainty. We are listening to what the sport's ministry and the government are telling us about whether we'll be able to have fans in the stadium.

"There are different opinions and no-one is sure if we'll be able to have fans or if it'll have to be behind closed doors."

Spain's tough lockdown measures to tackle the coronavirus pandemic have made organising the Davis Cup tricky, but Pique said work is being done should the easing of restrictions mean the event can go ahead.

"I think in the next few weeks we'll have more clarity but right now we're trying to be prepared," he added.

"People are working from home and obviously we can't go to Madrid to look at facilities, we are prepared in case we end up being able to organise it."

The United States secured a place at this year's Davis Cup Finals, while Argentina missed out.

The USA were too strong for Uzbekistan in Honolulu as the Bryan brothers delivered the decisive victory on Saturday.

Playing their final Davis Cup match, Bob and Mike Bryan secured USA's place in Madrid with a 6-3 6-4 win over Sanjar Fayziev and Denis Istomin in the third rubber.

Argentina, the 2016 champions, failed to qualify after going down 3-1 to Colombia in Bogota.

Daniel Elahi Galan delivered the decisive win by beating Juan Ignacio Londero 6-3 6-4.

Marin Cilic led Croatia past India in Zagreb, Australia overcame Brazil 3-1 and Italy swept past South Korea 4-0.

Hungary edged Belgium 3-2, Germany brushed past Belarus 4-1, Kazakhstan beat the Netherlands and the Czech Republic, Austria, Ecuador and Sweden also reached the Finals.

China have pulled out of this year's Davis Cup due to travel restrictions imposed amid the spread of the coronavirus.

The Chinese team had been due to face Romania in a World Group I play-off on March 6-7, but they have forfeited the match.

Their withdrawal was announced by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) on Tuesday. The city of Piatra Neamt, in northern Romania, had been due to stage the fixture.

The ITF announced on Twitter: "The Davis Cup committee has accepted the withdrawal of China, PR from their Davis Cup World Group I play-off against Romania on 6-7 March.

"The increased restrictions in response to the current coronavirus outbreak have resulted in the China, PR team being unable to travel to this tie. Romania will advance to play in World Group I in September."

The coronavirus - officially named Covid-19 - has caused a host of sporting events in China and Asia to be postponed or cancelled.

Those affected have included Formula One's Chinese Grand Prix, the athletics World Indoor Championship, snooker's China Open and several golf tournaments.

China has seen over 70,000 confirmed cases during its outbreak, with the death toll rising above 1,800 victims.

Rafael Nadal feels there needs to be an agreement between the ITF and the ATP to create a single "world cup" as opposed to the separate Davis Cup and ATP Cup.

ATP world number one Nadal starred in Spain's triumph at the Davis Cup - organised by the ITF - in November, but he and his country were on the losing side at the inaugural ATP Cup on Sunday, going down to Novak Djokovic's Serbia.

The Spaniard enjoyed the new tournament but suggested the two competitions were a source of confusion.

"[The ATP Cup] is a long competition. It's a tough way to start the season," Nadal said. "I don't know. I think it's a great competition but, at the same time, I can't change my mind.

"Two world cups in [just over] one month is not real. It's not possible. So, we need to find a way to fix it and we need to find a way to make a big deal with ITF and ATP to create a big world team cup competition, not two world cups in one month.

"I think that's confusing for the spectators. We need to be clear in our sport.

"And for the health of our sport and the benefit of our sport, in my opinion, it is mandatory that we fix it.

"I think it is a great competition. I am excited to be part of it, excited to represent my country.

"I enjoyed sharing the week with my friends on the team. The organisation has been fantastic, honestly, everything as good as possible. Just, in my mind, we need to create one thing and not two."

Meanwhile, Nadal was unhappy with some sections of the crowd in Sydney, where a partisan Serbian contingent roared on rival Djokovic, who beat the world number one 6-2 7-6 (7-4) in the second singles rubber, before joining forces with Viktor Troicki to beat Pablo Carreno Busta and Feliciano Lopez 6-3 6-4 in the doubles decider.

"Honestly, the crowd was fantastic every single day," Nadal continued. "But, sometimes, people from some countries, they probably don't understand how tennis is.

"They think it is more like football, but the atmosphere in tennis is different. The respect for the players should be there. At some point, the respect - from a small part of the crowd - was not there."

Andy Murray opted not to take any risks with a "bit of an issue" after only playing once for Great Britain in their run to the Davis Cup semi-finals.

The former world number one recorded a three-set singles victory against Tallon Griekspoor of the Netherlands but did not feature again during the new-look tournament in Spain.

Murray instead cheered on his team-mates as they reached the last four in Madrid, where they lost to eventual champions Spain.

The Scotsman – who lifted his first title following hip surgery at the European Open in October – revealed a "mild" groin issue kept him off the court, though only after consultation with both medical staff and team captain Leon Smith.

"I had a bit of an issue with my groin, pelvis. I wanted to play but I wasn't allowed to risk it," he said, according to quotes in the Mirror.

"I took the final decision but I'm obviously speaking to my physio, doctor, speaking to Leon.

"I don't know exactly when I did it because I had a scan straight after the match with Tallon Griekspoor because my groin area was sore during the match.

"I had noticed it a little bit a couple of days in the build-up so I didn't know because after Antwerp I took 12 days off or something and didn't hit any balls, and then I slowly built up till I got over to Madrid and then started practising hard and I noticed it was a bit sore.

"It was more like a bony bruise. It’s mild. But that was something which if I had played on it, it could have got worse. And that's why it was difficult for me."

Murray was speaking prior to the premier of his Amazon Prime Video documentary - Andy Murray: Resurfacing - that charts his comeback from a career-threatening hip issue.

Rafael Nadal described Spain's Davis Cup success as "unforgettable" after beating Canada in the final in Madrid on Sunday.

Nadal overcame Denis Shapovalov 6-3 7-6 (9-7) after Roberto Bautista Agut had beaten Felix Auger-Aliassime to secure Spain's sixth Davis Cup title.

World number one Nadal was delighted with the success, saying it was a victory he would never forget.

"When you finally win the title after all the things that we went through this week, and playing at home, it is something difficult to describe," he said, via the Davis Cup website.

"It's an amazing feeling, and especially to share this great moment with all the people that supported us during the whole week is just unforgettable, for all the fans.

"And to share this victory too with the rest of the team, our six – and there is a much bigger team behind the scenes. We can't thank all of them enough.

"It's been an unforgettable week for all of us, without a doubt, so I'm super happy. And, honestly, it's one of these weeks that we'll never forget."

Bautista Agut made a gutsy return to the team just days after the death of his father.

The 31-year-old said he initially had no intention of playing as he hailed the efforts of his team-mates.

"It was very difficult. I was speaking with Sergi [Bruguera, captain] about the situation, and I took the decision to go home on Thursday morning, and I was back yesterday afternoon to support the team," Bautista Agut said.

"I drove here from Castellon and I didn't think about playing. I came to support the team with all my heart, but once we qualified for the final, I started to feel like playing.

"I had the opportunity to play because all the team and all the players and the rest of the team did an unbelievable effort since the first day. And, well, it was an amazing feeling on the court."

Rafael Nadal and Roberto Bautista Agut sealed Spain's sixth Davis Cup triumph at the expense of Canada's young guns on an emotional Sunday at a raucous La Caja Magica.

Bautista Agut shed tears on court after beating 19-year-old Felix Auger-Aliassime 7-6 (7-3) 6-3 in the first rubber just three days after the death of his father.

The 31-year-old showed incredible character to return for the final and rose to the occasion with the backing of a partisan crowd in Madrid.

Nadal then took centre stage on a highly charged evening, defeating battling 20-year-old Denis Shapovalov 6-3 7-6 (9-7) to secure a first Davis Cup triumph in eight years for the hosts as Canada failed to spoil the party in their first final.

Victory for Nadal in his homeland meant there was no need to battle it out in a deciding doubles rubber and put the icing on the cake at the end of another glorious season, which saw him win two grand slams to take his incredible tally to 19.

The world number one served superbly from the start but had to bide his time to force a break.

Shapovalov fended off break points in each of his first two service games before his fellow left-hander took a 4-2 lead with a rasping cross-court inside-out forehand winner.

A fired-up Nadal hopped beyond the baseline in delight after a return from Shapovalov sailed long to end a first set in which the home favourite lost just three points behind his sensational serve.

Shapovalov found another level in the second set, showing his quality with searing winners off both wings, but Nadal roared after saving the first break points he faced before levelling at 3-3.

Nadal saved a set point in a tie-break that always looked to be on the cards and dropped to the court in delight after Shapovalov drilled a forehand wide to spark jubilant scenes.

Auger-Aliassime earlier made a mammoth 45 unforced errors as Bautista Agut's experience shone through, the world number nine raising the roof when he took the opening-set tie-break after his teenage opponent overcooked a couple of wild groundstrokes.

Bautista Agut continued to glide around the court with fluency and opened up a 3-0 lead in the second set, then went 4-2 up courtesy of another errant Auger-Aliassime forehand after he had got back on serve. 

The composed Bautista Agut refused to allow Auger-Aliassime - who has been sidelined with an ankle injury - a way back and pointed to the sky after a hold to love made it 1-0 Spain.

Spain will face Canada in Sunday's Davis Cup final after Rafael Nadal and Feliciano Lopez edged the hosts past Great Britain.

A gripping semi-final saw the singles split and the tie came down to drama in the doubles on Saturday.

The Spanish duo, in front of a partisan crowd in Madrid, survived a major test as Nadal and Lopez needed two tie-breaks to fend off Jamie Murray and Neal Skupski.

With Andy Murray roaring on the British team from courtside, his older brother and Skupski pushed Nadal and Lopez through two intense sets before falling just short, losing 7-6 (7-3) 7-6 (10-8).

The British pair had set points to take it to a decider, but Spain, and Nadal in particular with one sublime overhead after a brilliant reach, produced their best when the pressure was at its greatest.

It was always likely Britain would need Kyle Edmund to win his singles rubber and he duly delivered with a 6-3 7-6 (7-3) win against Lopez – a late stand-in for the injured Pablo Carreno Busta.

But Nadal coasted to a 6-4 6-0 beating of Dan Evans, who tailed off after putting up a valiant effort in the first set against his more illustrious opponent.

And after the late-night doubles joy, with the contest finishing well after midnight, Nadal said: "I think we played a great match. 'Feli' served great the whole match and at important moments he did everything well.

"Thank you very much to Feli and the rest of the team."

Lopez said: "There was a lot of drama today on the court. We are very pleased we somehow managed to play those points in a very good way.

"It was a lot of drama but this is what you expect when you play this kind of match. I think we have a very good opportunity tomorrow to lift this cup."

Earlier, Canada reached the Davis Cup final for the first time in their history by winning a similarly thrilling tie against Russia.

Denis Shapovalov kept Canada in with a chance by beating Karen Khachanov 6-4 4-6 6-4 after Andrey Rublev overcame Vasek Pospisil 6-4 6-4.

And the Canadian duo defeated their Russian rivals 6-3 3-6 7-6 (7-5) in a thrilling deciding doubles rubber.

Canada won a thrilling tie against Russia to seal a place in the Davis Cup final for the first time on Saturday.

Russia prevailed in a deciding doubles tie-break in an epic contest with Serbia a day earlier but were unable to repeat the trick as Denis Shapovalov and Vasek Pospisil made history for Canada.

The duo secured a 6-3 3-6 7-6 (7-5) triumph over Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov in Madrid, despite Pospisil having received treatment on a shoulder injury prior to the final set.

It marked the culmination of a memorable tussle, in which Russia struck first when Rublev earned a fourth singles victory of the week with a 6-4 6-4 win over Pospisil.

That meant Shapovalov had to defeat Khachanov to keep Canada's hopes alive and things were not looking good when the Russian raced into a 4-1 lead.

Shapovalov rallied brilliantly to take the opener, but succumbed when serving to stay in the second at 5-4 down.

A tense decider went the way of Shapovalov, who celebrated a 6-4 4-6 6-4 victory in a match featuring 73 unforced errors.

Spain or Great Britain, who contest the other last-four tie, await in the final.

Barcelona defender Gerard Pique denied his Davis Cup commitments are a distraction and has demanded respect from his critics.

The 32-year-old has spent a large part of the week travelling to Madrid due to the involvement of his company Kosmos in the revamped international tennis team event.

Head coach Ernesto Valverde gave Pique permission to make the trips to the Spanish capital, but he publicly warned the centre-back he would not play against Leganes on Saturday if his focus was not on Barcelona.

After playing a full part in Barca's 2-1 win at Estadio Municipal de Butarque, Pique explained his extra-curricular activities have had no impact on his performances on the field.

"I had friendly talks with [Valverde] this week," Pique told reporters. "He asked me what the plans for this week were and how we were going to do it.

"The relationship between me and him is good and we get along well. We talk every week and everything with him and the club is going well.

"It is more about the noise from the outside, which centres around whether I'm in Madrid, or if I have dinner here or there. It is all part of the circus and part of my job, but I try to do my best.

"In the end, they are 40-minute trips. I think we give a lot of attention to who I am and who I represent, but I try to make things as simple as possible. People can opine whatever they want, but respect me."

Pique, who planned to stay in Madrid to watch the semi-finals of the Davis Cup, talked up the importance of his side's comeback against Leganes.

Youssef En-Nesyri gave bottom side Leganes an early lead, but Luis Suarez and substitute Arturo Vidal hit back in the second half for Barcelona, who continue to jostle with Real Madrid for the LaLiga ascendancy.

"It was important for the team to continue winning in order to gain confidence," Pique said.

"If at the beginning of the season you told us we would be the leaders in LaLiga and our Champions League group, we would have taken it.

"In terms of the game, we know we can improve but the most important thing is to win games."

Spain will face Great Britain in the Davis Cup semi-finals but Serbia's hopes of glory in the tournament came to a tearful end in Madrid on Friday.

With world number one Rafael Nadal in sparkling form, host nation Spain fought back after losing the opening singles rubber to defeat 2016 champions Argentina in a late finish in the capital.

Their reward is a last-four clash against a Britain squad that progressed past Germany without the need to play doubles, Kyle Edmund and Dan Evans recording respective wins over Philipp Kohlschreiber and Jan-Lennard Struff.

Edmund prevailed in straight sets to reward the decision taken by captain Leon Smith to retain the same line-up that secured qualification for the knockout stage by beating Kazakhstan.

That meant Andy Murray once again sat out proceedings, the Scot instead taking up a supportive role from close to the court as he cheered his team-mates on.

Evans had lost his previous two matches but held his nerve in a deciding tie-break against Struff, with the 7-6 (8-6) 3-6 7-6 (7-2) result securing an unassailable 2-0 advantage.

They will have to find a way to cope with Nadal on Saturday, though, after the Spaniard dazzled on home soil, crushing Diego Schwartzman in just over an hour before combining with Marcel Granollers in the decisive doubles.

Nadal and Granollers got past Maximo Gonzalez and Leonardo Mayer 6-4 4-6 6-3.

In the other half of the draw, Russia came out on top in a tight, tense doubles contest to knock out Serbia.

Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov saved three match points before eventually overcoming Viktor Troicki and Novak Djokovic 6-4 4-6 7-6 (10-8), sparking wild celebrations.

However, while a jubilant Russia will look forward to facing Canada next, there was nothing but disappointment for a Serbia squad desperate for success to reward the retiring Janko Tipsarevic's service in the competition.

Troicki offered an apology in an emotional news conference, telling the media: "We had chances to finish it. We didn't do it. I messed up in the crucial moments."

An emotional Viktor Troicki apologised to his team-mates after declaring he "messed up in the crucial moments" of Serbia's Davis Cup defeat to Russia on Friday.

After the two nations had split the singles at one win apiece, they combined to play out an absorbing, see-saw doubles encounter for the right to face Canada in the last four.

Serbia's pairing of Troicki and Novak Djokovic failed on three occasions to get over the line, allowing Russian duo Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov to battle back from the brink and seal a dramatic victory.

Djokovic – who had beaten Khachanov earlier to level the tie – attempted to console his distraught compatriot on the court in the immediate aftermath, while members of the Serbia squad were unable to hold back the tears during a poignant post-match press conference.

For Troicki, the hero in his country's 2010 Davis Cup success against France, the result was tough to take.

"I never experienced such a moment in my career, in my life," Troicki told the media. "I let my team down and I apologise to them.

"We had chances to finish it. We didn't do it. I messed up in the crucial moments.

"God gave me once to be the hero, to win the Davis Cup in the deciding rubber. Now he took it away. I'm really, really disappointed in myself that I couldn't hold my focus until the end and finish."

Serbia had been hoping to send off Janko Tipsarevic on a winning note, the 35-year-old having already announced this year that he would retire after the new-look tournament in Spain.

Team captain Nenad Zimonjic admitted it was not the finish he wanted for a group of players he described as his country's golden generation.

"I see it as an end, because it is Janko's last match, but he's obviously going to be here for us all the way, not just for this tie and in the future, because we are really good friends," Zimonjic said.

"You dream maybe to go all the way, to celebrate with a victory, but sometimes it doesn’t happen what you want to happen.

"But the main thing that everybody knows here [is] how much we care for each other and love each other, and that's what got us here."

Andy Murray will not feature for Great Britain in their Davis Cup quarter-final tie against Germany on Friday after Kyle Edmund was once again picked for singles action.

Murray was rested for the Group E victory over Kazakhstan on Thursday that secured Great Britain's place in the knockout stages of the new-look tournament in Spain. 

Captain Leon Smith admitted after the 2-1 win that he was unsure if the Scot - who had laboured to a three-set victory over Tallon Griekspoor of the Netherlands in his team's opening outing - would return to the line-up.

And Edmund, who played instead against Kazakhstan, recording an impressive victory over Mikhail Kukushkin, has retained his spot in the line-up.

His opponent in the opening match will be Philipp Kohlschreiber, with Dan Evans then going up against Jan-Lennard Struff.

If required, Jamie Murray and Neal Skupski will once again team up for the doubles. Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies are scheduled to be their opponents.

The winners of the tie will go up against either Argentina or hosts Spain - who also meet in Friday's second session in Madrid - in the last four.

In the other half of the draw, Russia knocked out Novak Djokovic's Serbia courtesy of a hard-fought doubles win, Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov saving three match points before eventually prevailing. Next up will be Canada, who qualified for the semi-finals on Thursday.

Denis Shapovalov and Vasek Pospisil sent Australia packing as Alex de Minaur's singles victory proved fruitless in the first Davis Cup quarter-final.

With Pospisil defeating John Millman 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 in the opening match, Australia relied on a comeback from De Minaur to haul themselves level.

Next Gen ATP Finals runner up De Minaur – Australia's star player in Thursday's tie with Nick Kyrgios sitting out – did it the hard way, coming from a set down to beat Shapovalov 3-6 6-3 7-5 and tee up a deciding doubles encounter.

But Canada were too good in the doubles – Pospisil picking up where he left off while Shapovalov bounced back from his loss in style via a 6-4 6-4 win.

A break of serve in the opening game against Australian counterparts Jordan Thompson and John Peers paved the way for the pair to claim the first set with ease.

Thompson and Peers looked set to take the match all the way when they earned a 3-0 lead in set two, only for Shapovalov and Pospisil to restore parity before pushing on to seal progression with their first match point.

Serbia play Russia, Argentina face Spain and Great Britain go up against Germany in the other quarter-final ties, which will be played on Friday.

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