Daniil Medvedev's triumph at the ATP Finals has earned public acclaim from Russia president Vladimir Putin, who said he "demonstrated great preparation, mastery and truly fighting spirit".

World number four Medvedev won a barnstorming final against Dominic Thiem in the last showpiece to be held at London's O2 Arena before the season-ending tournament moves to Turin in 2021.

Medvedev came from a set down to defeat the US Open champion - who had beaten him en route to glory at Flushing Meadows - to secure the biggest title of his career.

In doing so, Medvedev became the second Russian to win the event after Nikolay Davydenko in 2009.

Putin posted a telegram on the Kremlin's official website on Tuesday, part of which was quoted by Russian news agency TASS, to congratulate Medvedev.

"You went through the whole ATP Finals tournament brilliantly and, in one breath, you demonstrated great preparation, mastery and truly fighting spirit in beautiful and tense matches," the telegram read. 

"Your victory continues great traditions of the Russian tennis school."

Medvedev and Thiem each scored wins over both Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic to reach Sunday's showpiece.

Speaking on Monday, Medvedev said it will be difficult for any of the chasing pack to become world number one while ever those two greats are still playing.

"It's still a long way to get to the top of the line [in the ATP rankings]," Medvedev told TASS.

"You have to complete the season better than all the rest to become the world's number one. Sometimes 8,000 points can be sufficient but on other occasions 12,000 points are not enough. 

"It all depends on me; the more tournaments that I’ll have like in Paris and London, the more chances I’ll get to top of the ATP rankings."

Daniil Medvedev expressed his desire for more matches against Dominic Thiem on the biggest stages after revelling in one of his "best victories" to become ATP Finals champion.

The Russian won a thriller at London's O2 Arena, coming from behind to win 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 to overcome an opponent who had defeated him in the semi-finals of the US Open.

Medvedev and Thiem had beaten Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic respectively to reach Sunday's showpiece, which marked the last in the English capital before Turin becomes host to the Finals in 2021.

The world number four had nothing but praise for Thiem, who went on to win the title at Flushing Meadows, when addressing his win after the match.

"First of all, what a match. Maybe one of my best victories," the champion said.

"I mean, two hours 42, three sets against an amazing player, Dominic congrats for what you achieved in your career, I think your name is already in the history books of tennis.

"So, it's amazing, you won a grand slam this year. I mean, you're playing unbelievable. I hope we're going to have many more matches to come on the big occasions like this - semi-final of the US Open and final here - so congrats to you and your team. You're doing an amazing job."

The respect was returned by Thiem, who was typically classy in defeat and reflected on a season that saw him make his major breakthrough.

"Of course, I'm disappointed, but at the same time I'm also proud of the performance, of all the week," he said.

"Daniil really deserves it. Amazing match, congrats for, in general, another great year as well.

"Amazing month, November, with the Bercy [Paris Masters], title here and I hope we have many great matches to come. It was a pleasure today even though I lost.

"And thanks also to my team for all the support - without the crowd it's even more important.

"Thanks a lot, we had an unbelievable year as well. Thanks for taking care of me in all the bubbles and I can't wait for other great years with all of you."

Daniil Medvedev roared back from a set down to defeat Dominic Thiem and become the ATP Finals champion after a titanic tussle at the O2 Arena in London.

Medvedev earned the biggest prize of his career in a 4-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 triumph in the last final held in London before the tournament moves to Turin next year.

It was a fitting end to the English capital's run as Medvedev produced a valiant fight back on the back of 37 winners to become the second Russian ATP Finals victor, becoming the first to defeat the world's top three players to do so in the process on Sunday.

Medvedev, who defeated Rafael Nadal in the semi-finals, gains a measure of revenge for his last-four defeat to eventual champion Thiem at the US Open, with his Austrian opponent – a winner over Novak Djokovic on Saturday – losing the showpiece match for the second year running.

Thiem staved off a break point with a huge ace in his mammoth first service game but there was little to separate two players in great form in a slog of a first set.

In the end it was a costly lapse in concentration where Medvedev dropped five straight points on serve – one a glorious reverse forehand drop-shot from Thiem that preceded an ugly double fault for the break.

Thiem, who matched his opponent with 12 winners in the first set, clinched the opener with a fortuitous net chord that brought a wry smile from Medvedev.

Medvedev was more grimacing than smiling as he had to dig deep on serve in games five and seven, though, as the quality on display from both players increased.

But the Russian held his nerve to force the breaker and, after losing the first two points, reeled off seven in a row to force the decider against Thiem.

With the momentum shifting, Thiem survived from 0-40 in game three but – after saving a couple more break points – finally slipped behind at his next service game when an audacious backhand was followed by a clinical volley by Medvedev. 

Thiem refused to yield and made his opponent fight for every point but a huge serve from Medvedev was unreturnable to leave the 2019 US Open runner-up celebrating.

 

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Medvedev – 37/30
Thiem – 29/29

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Medvedev – 12/3
Thiem – 6/1

BREAK POINTS WON
Medvedev – 1/9
Thiem – 1/4

Rafael Nadal's wait for a first ATP Finals win rolls on for at least another year after he slumped out in the semis to Daniil Medvedev in London.

The world number two has 86 singles titles, including 20 majors, to his name, yet the season-ending showdown is not counted among his honours, and it was Medvedev who progressed to a final with last year's runner-up Dominic Thiem thanks to a 3-6 7-6 (7-4) 6-3 success.

Medvedev was in relentless form, though Nadal pulled out his full repertoire of shots to take the lead in the opener before clawing himself back from 4-1 down in the second set tie-break.

Ultimately, though, Medvedev had too much and, after clinching the second set, maintained the momentum to break twice in the decider and claim his first win over Nadal.

After an aggressive start, Medvedev had three chances to break in game three, yet the Russian failed to take the opportunity to nose himself ahead.

Nadal, however, made no such mistake five games later as he constructed an excellent rally from the baseline before drawing world number four Medvedev into an overhit forehand.

The set was wrapped up in Nadal's favour at the first time of asking, but Medvedev responded in force and a double-fault from Nadal handed him the next break.

Medvedev had a second break in his sights at 4-1 up, yet a missed cross-court backhand gave Nadal a reprieve, and the 34-year-old hammered home a venomous serve.

An emphatic Medvedev ace saved a break point, but a pair of volleys put Nadal on the front foot, with the southpaw then lashing a cross-court forehand beyond his opponent.

More clinical shots dragged Nadal level and what looked set to be a crucial break followed – the 13-time French Open champion lifting a delicate lob down the line after Medvedev had closed in on the net.

Yet Nadal went from serving to win the match to serving to stay in the set within the space of nine points.

Nadal held his nerve to force a tie-break, in which a slice of good fortune with a lob saw Medvedev take a 6-3 lead, with the set sealed in his favour on the second set point.

The intensity continued into the decider, with blow after blow exchanged until Medvedev – on his third chance – broke with a powerful return, forcing Nadal to serve to stay in the match.

But Medvedev had the answer for everything his opponent threw at him and, after a perfect forehand teed up match point, victory was secured when a tame Nadal shot hit the net.

 

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Medvedev - 42/22
Nadal - 30/30

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Medvedev - 13/3
Nadal - 3/3

BREAK POINTS WON
Medvedev - 4/11
Nadal - 3/4

Daniil Medvedev maintained the last remaining 100 per cent record at the ATP Finals to head into his last-four meeting with Rafael Nadal on a high.

The world number four had not dropped a set against Alexander Zverev or Novak Djokovic and showed the already-eliminated Diego Schwartzman no mercy in a 6-3 6-3 success on Friday.

Medvedev wasted little time in taking command of proceedings, even if Schwartzman battled to an initial hold.

The Russian led at the next opportunity, picking out the right corner of the court with his forehand and then racing through his own service games to preserve his advantage.

A sharp increase in pressure then allowed Medvedev to clinch the opener on Schwartzman's serve, despite seeing an outrageous stretching return to tee up set point go to waste.

Medvedev converted next time, following up a blistering cross-court effort by blasting straight through his opponent at the net.

The breakthrough in the second again came in Schwartzman's second service game, with the third of three break points a sweetly struck backhand.

That was enough to seal victory, Medvedev breezing through this dead rubber - served out to love - before the real business continues against Nadal in Saturday's semi-final.


WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Medvedev - 30/19
Schwartzman - 13/8

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Medvedev - 4/1
Schwartzman - 0/0

BREAK POINTS WON
Medvedev - 3/9
Schwartzman - 0/2

Novak Djokovic urged the government to support players heading into the Australian Open, the world number one calling for authorities to sanction lead-up tournaments while quarantining.

Victorian premier Daniel Andrews is confident the 2021 Australian Open will go ahead amid the coronavirus pandemic and concerns over international travel.

There have been reports pre-Australian Open events will be held in Victoria, rather than around Australia in cities like Sydney and Brisbane, in order to minimise travel ahead of the year's opening grand slam in Melbourne.

Initial reports suggested players would arrive in Australia in mid-December to undertake mandatory quarantine of two weeks before competing, though the ATP has since pointed to plans for January.

Asked about the looming Australian Open, defending champion and record-setting eight-time winner Djokovic told reporters following his ATP Finals loss to Daniil Medvedev on Wednesday: "There's several options I hear that are on the table and I think Tennis Australia has been very communicative and very open with the process with us players.

"I'm very pleased with the way Craig Tiley and the other staff from Tennis Australia have been trying to fight for us as best conditions as is possible for the players. But it's also not in their hands obviously, the government of Australia decides and Victoria on the conditions and restrictions and so forth.

"As far as I know so far, the Australian Open will happen whether it's in the current week or the week later. If that's what's necessary then yes I would understand the Australian Open being pushed a week later. Even though the tournaments post-Australian Open would get hurt.

"So we have to, as men's and women's tennis and the ATP, WTA, everybody involved, we have to consider what are the ramifications of maybe potentially some decisions that are going to be made in terms of the calendar in Australia and how that's going to affect the Tour after that. I'm planning to play the Australian Open for sure, I would like to go there and I'm ready to quarantine for two weeks and whatever is necessary for me to be able to play.

"I hope that there's going to be support and understanding from the Australian government for the players and for Tennis Australia and they will allow players to compete in the second week of quarantine and hopefully that's going to help immensely with the calendar and everything and you won't be then losing a week, you'll be able to have a tournament or two prior to the Australian Open which for the majority of the players is important obviously for a lot of the players.

"They were done with the season in Paris and then potentially having no tournaments or official matches before the Australian Open, before a grand slam, is a huge thing. Hopefully we'll be able to have at least a tournament before the Australian Open."

Djokovic was easily swept aside by Russian star Medvedev 6-3 6-3 at the O2 Arena in London midweek.

Eyeing a record-equalling sixth ATP Finals trophy, Djokovic uncharacteristically tallied 28 unforced errors as he tasted defeat for just the fourth time this year, compared to 40 wins.

"I was a little bit [feeling unwell]," the 17-time major champion said about his fitness. "Especially towards the end of the first set and beginning of the second. I kind of regrouped and felt better towards the end of the match. But just an unfortunate 15-20 minutes for me that resulted with seven games in a row lost. Against a player like Medvedev then the match is done."

Djokovic – who will next meet Alexander Zverev for a spot in the final four – added: "He was a better player and deserved to win, no doubt about it."

Daniil Medvedev produced a near faultless performance to book his place in the last four of the ATP Finals by comfortably beating Novak Djokovic in straight sets.

Medvedev has typically presented Djokovic with more problems than most on the ATP Tour, though the world number one went into this Group Tokyo 1970 clash with a 4-2 edge in their head-to-head record.

However, Djokovic looked bereft of answers as Medvedev cruised to a 6-3 6-3 win at the O2 Arena, making only 12 unforced errors in 18 games.

It marked the first best-of-three-sets match between the two not to go the distance since Djokovic's triumph at Eastbourne in 2017, with Medvedev now having won three of their last four meetings.

Djokovic, whose match with Alexander Zverev on Friday will decide the other semi-finalist from the group, was under pressure early on and staved off a pair of break points in the third game.

Two more went begging for Medvedev in the seventh before the pressure eventually told at the fifth attempt.

An uncharacteristically sloppy Djokovic surrendered the set with his fourth double fault and the momentum stayed with Medvedev thereafter as he raced into a 3-0 lead in the second, saving the only break point he faced in the process.

Service games became increasingly routine for Medvedev, with Djokovic posing little threat, and an authoritative forehand rounded off one of the more impressive wins of the world number four's burgeoning career.

"To be completely honest I'm sure he didn't play his best today," Medvedev said of Djokovic's performance in his on-court interview. 

"It happens for everybody, the big three are champions because it happens less for them than for other players, still tough to beat them on their bad days.

"He was a little bit slower than usual, serving less good, I knew I had to take my chances. I think he had only one break point. Great match for me."


 

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS  
Medvedev: 20/12
Djokovic: 19/28

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS  
Medvedev: 10/4
Djokovic: 3/5

BREAK POINTS WON  
Medvedev: 3/8
Djokovic: 0/1

Daniil Medvedev recorded his maiden win at the season-ending ATP Finals as he defeated Alexander Zverev for the second time in eight days.

The Russian came out on top in an eventful first set that spanned 51 minutes on his way to recording a 6-3 6-4 triumph against a now-familiar opponent.

Medvedev lost when the pair met in the round-robin stage of the same tournament a year ago, though had come out on top in their most recent encounter, rallying from a set down in the final of the Paris Masters earlier in November.

There was no need for him to go the distance in London, however, as an erratic Zverev who struggled badly on his own serve – including sending down seven double faults – was beaten in straight sets.

Both players lost their opening service games as they struggled to take a grip on proceedings, Medvedev eventually the one to seize control as he finished strongly to seal the opener.

The second set was not so action-packed, though it did include an underarm serve from Medvedev at 30-all in the eighth game, a tactic that paid off as he won the point before offering up an apology.

By that stage the fourth seed had already recorded a break to edge himself ahead, a lead he retained comfortably enough to allow him to serve out the victory.

An angled backhand winner on the run saw Medvedev finish with a flourish, setting him up nicely for a clash with Novak Djokovic – who had earlier defeated Diego Schwartzman – on Wednesday.

"Confidence is a key, for sure. Winning a Masters always helps for confidence," Medvedev told Amazon Prime Sport in his on-court interview.

"It was a little bit shaky from both of us [in the first set]. Second set, it was easier for both of us to hit some winners because we were so tired, we couldn't run any more!"

 

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS 
Medvedev: 21/19
Zverev: 14/27

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS 
Medvedev: 4/2
Zverev: 3/7

BREAK POINTS WON 
Medvedev: 3/9
Zverev: 1/6

Novak Djokovic avoided defending champion Stefanos Tsitsipas and third seed Dominic Thiem, who were both drawn alongside Rafael Nadal for the ATP Finals.

World number one Djokovic, who will be aiming to win the trophy for a record-equalling sixth time, will take on Daniil Medvedev, Alexander Zverev and Diego Schwartzman in Group Tokyo 1970.

The Serbian heads to London on the back of just his third defeat of the season – one of which was his default at the US Open – in the quarter-finals of the Vienna Open to Lorenzo Sonego.

Zverev won the title in 2018, while Medvedev is returning after his ATP Finals debut last year and Schwartzman has reached the event for the first time.

Nadal has qualified for the year-ending competition for a record 16th straight year but faces a tricky task in Group London 2020 alongside Thiem, Tsitsipas and Andrey Rublev.

Tsitsipas lost to Nadal in the group stage but beat Thiem in the final to win the competition last year, though the Austrian will hope to go one better after making his major breakthrough by going all the way at the US Open.

Like Schwartzman, Rublev is competing at the tournament for the first time.

The ATP Finals, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary, is scheduled to begin on Sunday.

Daniil Medvedev won the Paris Masters title after fighting back from a set down to defeat Alexander Zverev in Sunday's final.

The Russian's last appearance in a Tour-level championship match was 13 months ago, when he beat Zverev in straight sets at the Shanghai Masters.

This was a more competitive affair, at least in the opening hour, but it was Medvedev who triumphed 5-7 6-4 6-1 to lift his eighth career title.

He is the fourth Russian to win the tournament, after Marat Safin, Nikolay Davydenko and Karen Khachanov.

Medvedev had lost five times in eight matches in the build-up to this event but has found form on the hard courts of the French capital, dropping just one set en route to the final.

Zverev, who dispatched Rafael Nadal in straight sets in the semi-finals, continued that form in the first set on Sunday as he missed his mark just five times on his first serve.

Medvedev kept pace until game 12, when he saved two break points but not the third, Zverev letting out a roar as he took a step towards a third Tour title in a row.

Each man was backing up their serve with authority, although Zverev saved four break points in the third game of the second set as Medvedev began to find more rhythm from the baseline.

The world number five got his breakthrough at the next time of asking before holding to love to level the match, as Zverev's form began to falter.

The German seemed suddenly bereft of confidence as he surrendered his opening service game to love, and a double break soon put Medvedev in control.

A double fault from the German on the second match point gifted an impressive win to Medvedev, who will feel full of confidence ahead of the ATP Finals in London.

Rafael Nadal maintained his perfect record against Pablo Carreno Busta to reach the Paris Masters semi-finals and send Diego Schwartzman to the ATP Finals.

World number two Nadal is bidding to win the ATP Masters 1000 tournament for the first time and fought from a set down to triumph 4-6 7-5 6-1 and improve his record against his fellow Spaniard to 7-0.

With Schwartzman having lost his quarter-final against Daniil Medvedev 6-3 6-1 earlier on Friday, Carreno Busta needed to win back-to-back titles in Paris and Sofia to stop the Argentinian taking the last remaining qualifying spot for the season-ending tournament.

He appeared to have a significant chance of keeping his hopes alive when he engineered three break points at the start of the second set, but 20-time grand slam champion Nadal held firm and forced his way into a final-four meeting with Alexander Zverev or Stan Wawrinka.

Nadal came under early pressure on his serve and Carreno Busta took his second chance to break, his impressive groundstrokes proving difficult for his opponent to cope with.

Back-to-back brilliant backhands put him on the brink of going a set and a break up in the first game of the second, but Nadal dug in to hold and began to step through the gears.

Carreno Busta showed impressive resilience to keep the contest on serve in games two and eight, before a wicked forehand down the line forced the match to a decider.

The ninth seed was broken to love in game four of the decider and won just two more points as Nadal surged to victory.

In the other semi-final Medvedev will take on Milos Raonic after the Russian took just 63 minutes to dispatch of Schwartzman.

Things were not as easy for Raonic, who staved off two match points and sent down 25 aces as he overcame Ugo Humbert 6-3 3-6 7-6 (9-7).

The Canadian saved all three of the break points he faced in the third set – and five out of six overall – and closed out the victory with a final ace.

A furious Daniil Medvedev suffered his fourth defeat in five matches as he crashed out of the St Petersburg Open to Reilly Opelka in his homeland on Thursday.

The top seed had ended a dismal losing streak with victory over Richard Gasquet in the first round and looked to be on course to advance again when he took the first set against Opelka.

But the 6ft 11in American responded to prevail 2-6 7-5 6-4 after successfully defending four Medvedev break points in the third set.

The world number six, who reached the US Open semi-finals before embarking on this desperate run, is the biggest scalp of Opelka's career.

"It is always a tough match, playing one of the best players in the world in general but especially at home," the victor said. "[It is] a great win for me.

"It was ugly for the first set and a half. I felt like I barely won any points on his serve, but part of that is just because of my opponent. Daniil is an absolute nightmare to play."

Medvedev smashed his racket into the court at the end of another frustrating contest.

Russia's other big names will at least fly the flag, as Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov progressed.

Rublev's comeback win over Ugo Humbert was a big one for the third seed, who is closing on a place in the ATP Finals. Canada's Denis Shapovalov is also in the running and remains in the hunt for the title this week.

Alexander Zverev eased through at the Cologne Indoors, beating Fernando Verdasco in straight sets, but Marin Cilic exited at the hands of Alejandro Davidovich Fokina.

Cilic led by a set and a break, then had two opportunities to break back in front at 5-5 in the second, before losing 3-6 7-6 (7-3) 6-2.

At the Sardegna Open, Casper Ruud was the victim of the day's biggest upset.

The third seed's prior five defeats since the ATP Tour returned in August had come against top-20 players, but he went down 6-2 6-1 to 101st-ranked Yannick Hanfmann.

Daniil Medvedev suffered a stunning late-night defeat to Marton Fucsovics after Rafael Nadal beat Egor Gerasimov in the first round of the French Open on Monday.

Fourth seed Medvedev became the biggest casualty in the men's draw at Roland Garros as Hungarian Fucsovics, ranked 63, won 6-4 7-6 (7-3) 2-6 6-1 on Court Suzanne-Lenglen.

It was after 11.30pm in Paris when the 28-year-old Fucsovics secured the first win against a top-five opponent in his career under the floodlights.

Medvedev lost the second set when he was given a point penalty for smashing his racket on an evening to forget for the Russian, who prompted raised eyebrows from his opponent when he won a point with an underarm serve.

Nadal overcame Gerasimov 6-4 6-4 6-2 and made notable strides from his quarter-final loss to Diego Schwartzman at the Internazionali d'Italia, while US Open champion Dominic Thiem also cruised into the second round.

The shocks came as eighth seed Gael Monfils, a semi-finalist in 2008, lost 6-4 7-5 3-6 6-3 to Alexander Bublik while 19th seed and rising star Felix Auger Aliassime was defeated by Yoshihito Nishioka 7-5 6-3 6-3.

Monfils' compatriot Corentin Moutet was knocked out by qualifier Lorenzo Giustino in a marathon five-setter and clay-court specialist Fabio Fognini tumbled out in four sets in his match with Mikhail Kukushkin.

NADAL RESUMES NORMAL SERVICE

Having struggled on serve in his surprise defeat to Schwartzman in the last eight in Rome, Nadal was much improved in that regard against Gerasimov.

He won 82 per cent of points on his first serve, with his improvement in that area leaving Nadal satisfied after coming through the first test in his quest for title number 13.

"I am trying to serve with high percentage. That's the first step that I have to do," said Nadal. "When I know that I can have a big percentage of first serves, then is the moment to increase the speed and increase the aggressiveness on the serve, no? Step by step. Today was the first step.

"Tomorrow, another day for practice. That's the only thing that I try to look at at this tournament, no? Try to be happy about every single improvement and try to give me a chance to be better every day."

THIEM NOT CAUGHT COLD BY CILIC

Thiem, fresh off his victory at Flushing Meadows, comfortably prevailed in a battle of US Open champions with Marin Cilic, spoiling the Croatian's 32nd birthday.

Thiem triumphed 6-4 6-3 6-3 and, while much has been made of the cold and the heavier balls at this year's event, the conditions are of no concern to the Austrian.

He said: "Conditions, I'm used to them or I know how to play in those kinds of conditions obviously because in Austria, we have many days like that. And then from junior times and when I started to play professional on the futures in March in Croatia or Czech Republic, there were many tournaments with similar conditions. Cold, heavy balls.

"So, it's not really something new for me, and it helps against guys like Marin, because it's a little bit easier to return many serves back in the court and to run down almost every ball. So, I like these conditions. And anyway, we have to do the best we can, because it's a very special year."

MOUTET LOSES SIX-HOUR MARATHON

There was more disappointment for the small number of home fans as Moutet followed Monfils in tumbling out of the tournament, albeit in significantly more dramatic fashion.

Moutet will have been expected to come through his clash with Giustino with little difficulty but was outlasted in an epic that was finally settled after six hours and five minutes of play.

Giustino progressed 0-6 7-6 (9-7) 7-6 (7-3) 2-6 18-16 and fell to his back in celebration as he came through a marathon encounter.

Asked for his thoughts on the contest, Moutet said: "My feelings, I don't know. We played a really long match, so I don't know. I don't feel anything in my body right now. I feel empty."

Daniil Medvedev was dumped out of the European Open in the first round following a shock 6-4 6-3 loss to Ugo Humbert.

World number five Medvedev was in action for the first time since his US Open semi-final defeat to eventual champion Dominic Thiem and the top seed in Hamburg was defeated in straight sets.

Humbert overcame Kevin Anderson and Fabio Fognini in straight sets at the Internazionali d'Italia last week and he claimed another impressive scalp – his first against a top-10 player – after an hour and 22 minutes.

The 22-year-old Frenchman ensured Medvedev did not enjoy his first match on clay since last year's French Open, and he will now face Jiri Vesely in the second round.

Reigning champion Nikoloz Basilashvili went down 6-4 6-3 to Roberto Bautista Agut, while third seed Gael Monfils bowed out with a 6-4 6-3 loss to Yannick Hanfmann.

Fognini came from a set down to beat Philipp Kohlschreiber, and Karen Khachanov rallied back from a double break down in the decider to progress at the expense of Jan-Lennard Struff.

Felix Auger-Aliassime downed Lorenzo Sonego 6-2 7-6 (7-2) and Cristian Garin got the better of Kei Nishikori in straight sets.

Daniil Medvedev felt Dominic Thiem played like a member of the 'big three' in their US Open semi-final on Friday.

Thiem triumphed in straight sets 6-2 7-6 (9-7) 7-6 (7-5) after Medvedev – the runner-up at Flushing Meadows last year – passed up a set point in the second-set tie-break and another when serving with a 5-3 lead in the third.

With Novak Djokovic having been defaulted from his fourth-round meeting with Pablo Carreno Busta for hitting a line judge with a ball, Rafael Nadal opting out of the tournament due to coronavirus concerns, and Roger Federer sitting out after undergoing knee surgery, the US Open will see the first maiden grand slam champion since Marin Cilic in 2014.

But Medvedev still felt like he was up against one of the ATP Tour's leading three players in his meeting with Thiem, who will battle Alexander Zverev in Sunday's showpiece.

"He played like a real champion. As I say, that's actually the stress of big three. No matter which day you play them, it seems like they play the same level," said Medvedev.

"Talking about myself or Dominic, we can have these bad days where maybe you can say I'm going to play to the backhand of Dominic and get some chances.

"Well, not during this US Open or Australian Open. He's playing really some great tennis, backhand, forehand, slice. Everything is there.

"I tried to mix it up. I feel like I've done a lot of great things tonight, but just didn't get it until the end."

Medvedev added: "He had a little bit more energy tonight, maybe. Let's call it a winning energy. I think it was the feeling throughout all the match. That's why I was serving two times for the set.

"I didn't do anything wrong, but he was playing really good. He fought until the end. I also fought for it until the end.

"We can discuss for hours about this, maybe I should have played cross, down the line. But tennis is not only about this, and he was really good tonight."

During the first set Medvedev received a code violation for crossing the net to point out where the ball had landed after being deemed not to have challenged in time.

The Russian took his complaints to the match supervisor and was heard saying: "The US Open is a joke, right? What did I do to get a code? Ah, yeah, sorry, I think I killed someone, right? Sorry, I was so bad to cross the net. My sincere apologies to the US Open for crossing the net."

Asked about the incident in his post-match news conference, Medvedev said: "I was just really angry. Of course, there was no reason to talk to him.

"But what surprises me sometimes in tennis is, okay, the supervisor is always there in case, let's say, for example, a default. He steps up, calls a default. It's not the decision of an umpire.

"For example, talking about my code violation today, I mean, what did I do? Did I hurt someone? Did I say something rude? I didn't do anything. I get a code. I'm like, supervisor, do something. Why are you sitting here?

"I still don't know the answer to this question. Of course, there was no reason to get angry on this."

Medvedev said he planned to have a short rest before playing the Hamburg Open to prepare for another grand slam tilt at Roland Garros.

"Last clay season my best tournaments were the first ones. Here I'm only going to have two. Hopefully I can have some great results," he said.

Page 1 of 4
© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.