Carl Robinson's stunning coaching switch from the Newcastle Jets to the Western Sydney Wanderers was confirmed on Thursday.

Robinson, 44, takes over at the Wanderers after leaving the Jets, where he had three years left on his contract.

It comes amid financial woes at Newcastle and just days after Jean-Paul de Marigny left Western Sydney despite being appointed full-time coach three months ago.

Robinson's impressive start in the A-League – the Welshman was appointed by Newcastle in February – saw the Wanderers make their move.

Using Opta data, we take a look at how his start compares to other A-League coaches.

Robinson won six, drew three and lost just one of his 10 games at the helm of the Jets, accumulating 21 points as Newcastle missed the finals.

That tally is the second best of any coach in A-League history through 10 games, with only former Adelaide United boss Rini Coolen (22 points) making a better start.

Coolen is the only coach in A-League history to be undefeated in his first 10 games (minimum 10 career games).

The Dutchman took charge of the Reds in 2010-11 after a poor 2009-10 campaign, and they finished third in the table before losing in the semi-finals.

John Kosmina and Gary van Egmond each collected 20 points to be ahead of Warren Joyce, Vitezslav Lavicka and Erick Mombaerts (19) on the list and behind Robinson.

Former Brisbane Roar boss Frans Thijssen and current Australia coach Graham Arnold round out the top nine.

Carl Robinson hopes Wolves keep star duo Adama Traore and Raul Jimenez, but the former midfielder knows the Premier League club may have to sell in order to improve their squad. 

Traore and Jimenez are reportedly attracting plenty of interest as Nuno Espirito Santo's Wolves continue to challenge the Premier League's elite since their return to the top flight in 2018-19. 

Wolves, who finished seventh last season, are sixth through 34 matches this term and flirting with another European berth thanks to Traore, Jimenez and a star-studded squad, including Portugal internationals Ruben Neves, Joao Moutinho and Rui Patricio. 

Jimenez – linked to Manchester United and Juventus – has scored 15 Premier League goals and tallied six assists in 2019-20, while reported Liverpool, Manchester City and Barcelona target Traore has set up nine goals and netted four of his own. 

While Traore and Jimenez could leave Molineux in big-money deals, Robinson insisted how Wolves reinvest transfer funds would be crucial in the club's bid to maintain their position and crack the Premier League's top five.

"The reality is, they've played fantastically well for Wolves this season, so there is going to be top clubs sniffing around them," Robinson, who made over 150 appearances for Wolves between 1995 and 2002, told Stats Perform News. 

"Wolves' decision will be: can they afford to keep them, can they afford to turn down these huge transfer fees and if they do and say we're going to turn down £70million for Traore, how can they invest and build the squad from where they are at the moment? 

"If they can't, they might have to look at the £70m and Nuno will ask the question, how much of that £70m can I have invested in the football squad because our starting point is lower than where we are today. That's why sometimes, unfortunately, managers lose jobs because their starting point is a lot lower, but expectations go higher based upon the club getting £70m and Nuno is spending £20m. 

"I hope they keep those players at Wolves because if they don't, there will be two major gaping holes. But I also understand football is a business and if they get £150m for two players, I'm not sure too many teams could turn that down. 

"You could bring in four or five £30m players. If you look at your squad, sometimes you have to go sideways, or backwards, to go forwards. But do it for the right reasons, do it because you're selling one of your key players knowing you have a youngster coming through in maybe 12 months.  

"That's an understandable plan you have as a club. That's why the executives and big boys are paid the big money, because they have to make major decisions. The buck stops with them. If they get it wrong, they lose their jobs." 

Wolves have come a long way since Chinese conglomerate group Fosun International purchased the club in 2016 – progressing from a mid-table side in the Championship to FA Cup semi-finalists last season and Europa League participants in 2019-20. 

Santo's side are six points adrift of fifth-placed Manchester United with four Premier League matches remaining, while Wolves – back in Europe for the first time since 1980 – are preparing to resume their Europa League last 16-tie against Olympiacos next month after the competition was suspended in March due to coronavirus following the 1-1 draw in Greece. 

"When you have Mexico's number nine, when you have three Portuguese international players, the Portugal international goalkeeper in your team, when you have four or five other players who cost you £10-15m each, when you have Adama Traore, who you've managed to buy and develop and now maybe possibly on the verge of a move to Liverpool for £70-80m, you have a standard of players that are of high quality," Robinson, now head coach of Australian team Newcastle Jets, said.  

"When you have better players, they are able to win you games in moments where games are tight. Games are tight in the Premier League especially. The investment has been fantastic, not only on the field but off it.

"They've tried to regain some of what Wolverhampton is about – it's a good old honest, working men's town. It's not the city, the bright lights of London, it's Wolverhampton. When you go there, you see it and you're proud to play for Wolves. But you're only proud to play for them if you understand what they're about. 

"They've managed to be successful and compete at the top half of the Premier League. That's very important and it's great, it's got the interest back in Wolves. It's good when they see their rivals – Aston Villa, Birmingham and West Brom especially – languishing.

"Their issue now, and it's a good issue to have, is to maintain where they are and keep up with the big boys, they need to invest at the minimum level to what they've already invested. We see football clubs sometimes going out of business and drop. Hopefully Wolves will never be at the stage because of the continued investment. 

"Most clubs in football are feeder clubs and I'll say this with the greatest respect to other than four or five teams, and even Premier League champions Liverpool had to sell Luis Suarez and Philippe Coutinho. They might have to sell either Sadio Mane or Mohamed Salah because there are clubs bigger that can pay the money.

"As a club, you know if you're successful you will lose your key players. How you replace them is key. 

"Wolves are in a great place. Hopefully they can stabilise where they are for the next three, four or five years and then continually try to crack the top five or six, which won't be easy." 

Alphonso Davies can become a Bayern Munich legend as former head coach Carl Robinson lauded the incredible success story of the Canadian teenager.

Davies has established himself as one of the most exciting players in European football since joining Bundesliga champions Bayern from MLS outfit Vancouver Whitecaps in 2019.

The 19-year-old speedster – who capped a fine campaign with the 2019-20 Bundesliga Rookie of the Year award – has been a revelation on the left side of Bayern's defence, helping the German powerhouses to an eighth consecutive league crown.

Davies also recorded a top speed of 36.51 kilometres per hour in Bayern's 1-0 over Werder Bremen in June, the fastest of any Bundesliga player since at least 2013-14.

The success of Davies, however, comes as no surprise to Welsh coach Robinson, who handed the Canada international his debut as a 15-year-old for the Whitecaps in MLS.

So, Robinson knows Davies better than most and while he is on the path to greatness, the ex-Wolves midfielder insisted there is still plenty of room for improvement.

"I do," Robinson – now coach of A-League side Newcastle Jets – told Stats Perform News when asked if Davies can become a Bayern legend. "I know his dream is maybe one day to play in England, like it is for a lot of North American players, South American players, Australasian players. Going to play in Europe is the cream of the crop. That won't surprise me at some stage if that comes, but that will only be based upon his development and continuation.

"But one of my coaches had said to him, there was a clip where they saw him getting back on Mason Mount from 30 yards [in the Champions League]. Mount was breaking and Alphonso managed to get himself back into that area and stop the danger. Everyone was raving about how quick he is, he's not human, he's so quick.

"It's interesting that one of my coaches, Pa-Modou Kah who is now the manager of Pacific FC in the CPL and a very talented coach, turns around and says, 'Alphonso, you were in the wrong starting position'.

"So, the way he gets taught is very important. He is scary in relation to his physical attributes but the detail in it was he was in the starting position. Can you imagine if he plays against a player like him, who is as quick as him, speed of thought is quicker and more experienced? He's not getting back and it will be 1-0. The teaching point for him there was he's had an excellent season, so many attributes you can build on and they're already talking about him being a €50million, €60m player, but there's still areas on his game that he needs to improve.

"What I've learned over my career, the top players need to be coached. If you don't coach them, they complain and moan. They want to be taught. That's why the best managers in the world and Premier League – the Mourinhos, Pochettinos, Klopps and Guardiolas – they are just so demanding on their players and you can see them getting frustrated sometimes with their top players because they need to be coached and you need to show them. If you do that, they progress.

"Football is short. The lifespan of a footballer is very, very small. Your life actually starts when you retire. So, the window gets shorter every year but it's important you learn. Lots of good things but also areas to improve if he's to play at that level year in, year out, which I firmly believe he will. But when he comes up against a Marcus Rashford, he needs to be in the right position or he probably won't get back in time."

Rewind back to July 2016 and Robinson – coach of the Whitecaps at the time – introduced Davies to MLS football, just one day after signing a league contract with the club.

Davies came off the bench against Orlando City and became the second-youngest player to take the field in MLS at 15 years, 257 days, behind Freddy Adu (14 years, 306 days).

"With football, when there's success stories and they are refreshing when there's young success stories, what you tend to find is people come out the woodwork and every Tom, Dick and Harry wants to take credit for a successful story," Robinson added.

"When there's a negative or disappointing story, the same people that want to shout from the rooftops are nowhere to be seen. Alphonso Davies is an unbelievably successful story. It's due to one; himself – because he is a very, very talented player. Yes, I gave him his first opportunity in football. I threw him in as a 15-year-old kid. So, the easy thing for me to do is say 'yeah, I gave him a chance, I played him, blah, blah, blah'.

"But prior to me making the decision to give him a chance, a lot of work went on behind the scenes. My coaching staff in Vancouver – Gordon Forrest, Martyn Pert – they were key to that. They had identified him, watched him, reviewed him and gave me an insight into exactly what he was. So, when I gave him a chance, there had already been done a lot of work behind the scenes.

"He got the chance and did well. A young player does well and they usually tend to play well for two or three games then have a little bit of a blip and drop. Then you have to protect them. That's where my experiences kicked in. I was a very good player, I wasn't a top player. There are top players and world-class players, I was a very good player. I knew what I needed to get to that level and stay at that level. That's the next key.

"I was able to support him on his journey. It was his journey, no one else's journey. I kept quiet a long the way for the benefit of him. It was important then that his team-mates – Kei Kamara, Kendall Waston and experiences players like that – were supportive with him. He had reference points and coaches that were his go-to which was very important. His mum and dad, a very supportive family network.

"It's a great success story for him. I'm really pleased. I'm not surprised one bit. Yes, I gave him his debut and I'm really proud that I did do that because back then, I knew what I saw and I gave him that chance. That's what leads me into this next chapter of how can I judge a player when I don't give them a chance? Can you imagine if I didn't make the decision to throw on Alphonso because there were people that said he wasn't ready to play and he wasn't ready to step into first-team football?

"We played Crystal Palace in a friendly game at BC Place and I was told he wasn’t ready but I listened to my staff and coaches key to me, and I believed them and took the chance... Alphonso deserves all the credit.

"He is a fantastic, talented young boy. Now it's about consistency because after having a very good year at left-back, which was key for his development, then he has to do it next year and the year after. Then, he can be put into the category of the Gareth Bales, Ashley Coles, the top players like that all over the world. That will be his next challenge but I firmly believe he can do it because he's a good kid."

Andrew Nabbout's spectacular 91st-minute strike secured a much-needed 2-1 A-League win for Melbourne Victory at home to Adelaide United on Saturday.

Victory peppered the Adelaide goal but looked set to fall short in their bid for a first league win since January 5 as they trailed to Kristian Opseth's fine early finish.

George Blackwood hit the crossbar as the visitors threatened a second approaching the hour-mark, only for Marco Rojas to quickly equalise at the other end, getting ahead of his marker and prodding past Paul Izzo.

The match was still level at the end of normal time, but Nabbout cut inside from the left flank and arrowed a stunning drive high past Izzo from the corner of the area to steal all three points.

Victory moved back ahead of Newcastle Jets, who had temporarily leapfrogged the Melbourne side earlier in the day courtesy of head coach Carl Robinson's first win.

The Jets' 2-1 triumph over Perth Glory also featured a magnificent goal, with Nikolai Topor-Stanley finding the top-right corner from 25 yards to open the scoring after 12 minutes.

Neil Kilkenny equalised from the penalty spot after Newcastle captain Nigel Boogaard's handball, yet Roy O'Donovan hit a 74th-minute winner.

Perth remain second in the table but are now winless in three in all competitions.

New Newcastle Jets head coach Carl Robinson was denied a first home win despite a dominant first half against Melbourne Victory on Saturday.

Former Vancouver Whitecaps boss Robinson was appointed prior to a home success against Central Coast Mariners earlier this month but watched that match from the stands.

The Jets subsequently drew 1-1 at Western Sydney Wanderers and were then held by the same scoreline by the Victory.

Newcastle twice had early Abdiel Arroyo goals ruled out, the first after referee Alireza Faghani inadvertently deflected a cross into the striker's path.

But Melbourne's luck ran out when Roy O'Donovan blasted Dimitrios Petratos' cutback against the crossbar and, after a short delay, the VAR ruled the ball had bounced over the line.

However, half-time killed the Jets' momentum, and visiting captain Ola Toivonen headed an equaliser four minutes after the restart to claim a share of the spoils.

It was also 1-1 between Brisbane Roar and Perth Glory in Saturday's earlier game.

Perth climbed to second with a point but were denied all three by former Newcastle United defender Macaulay Gillesphey, who cancelled out Bruno Fornaroli's first-half opener five minutes from time.

The Newcastle Jets confirmed the appointment of former Wales international Carl Robinson as their head coach.

The former Vancouver Whitecaps boss has signed a deal until the end of the 2022-23 A-League season and replaces Ernie Merrick, who was sacked last month, as the Jets' permanent coach.

Robinson made 52 appearances for Wales during his playing career, in which he also featured for the likes of Sunderland, Wolves and Norwich City.

The 43-year-old's first senior coaching job was with the Whitecaps, where he was at the helm for almost five years ending in September 2018.

"I am thrilled to be taking charge of the Jets. Everything I have seen about the club so far has been top class, they are desperate for success and hopefully we can achieve that together," Robinson said in a statement on Thursday.

"After first speaking to Lawrie [McKinna, Jets chief executive], I was genuinely excited about Newcastle. I spoke to several other people in and around the league and former team-mates of mine who have played and coached in Australia, and everyone was unbelievably positive about the club and the Hyundai A-League in general.

"The opportunity was too good to turn down. I am really looking forward to finalising my coaching staff, rolling our sleeves up and getting to work.

"I am moving my family from a beautiful city in Vancouver to another amazing part of the world. The city of Newcastle is a city on the up, and myself and my family are looking forward to joining the community and playing a huge part in the continued growth of football in this area."

McKinna said Robinson was a good fit for the Jets, who are struggling on the bottom of the A-League table with just 10 points from 15 games.

"Carl's name was one of the first ones that came up when we were considering who we would want as the new head coach, we felt he was the outstanding candidate from the start among hundreds of CVs that we received," he said.

"He's an experienced coach with a good understanding of the Hyundai A-League, and he knows how to work within a salary cap due to his MLS experience which is crucial for us.

"We've spoken at length about just about everything to do with the club, he came out to tour our facilities and the city to make sure it was the right fit for him which says a lot to us about the character of the man – that is very important to us."

Robinson will officially take over on Monday, a day after the Jets face the Central Coast Mariners in the F3 Derby.

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