The San Antonio Spurs announced on Monday that LaMarcus Aldridge will miss the rest of the 2019-20 season after undergoing right shoulder surgery.

Aldridge had missed six straight games with a sore shoulder from February 26 through to March 8 before returning to action on March 10. 

The seven-time NBA All-Star finished with 24 points and four blocked shots in 37 minutes in a win over the Dallas Mavericks in what would be San Antonio's final game before the season went on pause due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

"Disappointed I won't get to finish the season with my team-mates, but excited that I’ll be fully ready to go next season and beyond," the 34-year-old said in a message tweeted out by the Spurs.

The 2019-20 season marked Aldridge's 14th in the NBA; he ends it with averages of 18.9 points and 7.4 rebounds.

The Spurs had the Western Conference’s 12th-best record at 27-36 when the season was halted, good enough to garner an invite to the Walt Disney World Resort near Orlando, Florida as part of the 22-team field for the NBA’s restart plan.

June 8 is likely to be a date forever remembered fondly by Rafael Nadal, who secured two of his historic 12 French Open titles on this day.

Serena Williams also twice had reason to celebrate on the clay of Roland Garros on this date, although one final was tinged with the regret of having beaten her sister.

The Golden State Warriors tasted glory once again in 2018, while there was truly a shock for the ages when Argentina faced Cameroon at the World Cup in 1990.

Going back nearly 60 years, there was also a moment of baseball history for the Milwaukee Braves.

 

1961 - Milwaukee Braves hit home-run record

There were six teams scrambling for top spot in the National League when the Braves met the Cincinnati Reds at Crosley Field.

In front of a sparse crowd of just over 5,000 fans - many seem to have been exhausted by three previous night games in the series - the Reds claimed a 10-8 victory.

The Braves did at least make history with four consecutive home runs through Eddie Mathews, Hank Aaron, Joe Adcock and Frank Thomas in the seventh inning.

 

1990 - Argentina shocked by Cameroon

Perhaps the biggest World Cup upset in history, the reigning champions were beaten 1-0 by Cameroon at Italia 90.

A solitary goal from Francois Omam-Biyik was enough for the Indomitable Lions to defeat Diego Maradona's Argentina at San Siro.

Cameroon progressed as group winners and reached the quarter-finals, where they lost to England. Argentina made it to the final again but were beaten by West Germany.

 

2002 - Serena wins all-Williams final in Paris

The first of Serena's three French Open singles titles came 18 years ago when she defeated sister Venus 7-5 6-3.

It was the first step in the American's path to winning all four majors in a row, which would become known as the 'Serena Slam'; she claimed Wimbledon and the US Open later that year before winning the 2003 Australian Open, defeating her sister in each of those finals.

Twelve years later, Serena would achieve the feat a second time.

This date also marks seven years since Serena beat Maria Sharapova in the final at Roland Garros.

 

2008 - Nadal equals Borg record with Federer thrashing

Nadal became the first man since Bjorn Borg to win four French Open singles titles in a row when he defeated Roger Federer in the 2008 final.

The Spaniard, a 12-time champion at Roland Garros, triumphed 6-1 6-3 6-0 in a decidedly one-sided contest against his long-time rival.

Six years later, Nadal won French Open number nine on the same date, defeating Novak Djokovic 3-6 7-5 6-2 6-4 to draw level with Pete Sampras on 14 major singles titles. He has won a further five since.

 

2018 - Warriors claim third title in four years

Inspired by NBA Finals MVP Kevin Durant, the Warriors claimed their third NBA championship in four seasons on this day two years ago.

Golden State completed a 4-0 sweep of the Cleveland Cavaliers with a 108-85 win at what was then known as Quicken Loans Arena.

It was the second time in his career that LeBron James suffered the ignominy of a Finals sweep, having also endured it against the San Antonio Spurs in 2007.

June 7, 2009 was the date Roger Federer finally reigned at Roland Garros.

The Swiss completed his grand slam collection when beating Robin Soderling in the French Open final and, in doing so, equalled a record held by Pete Sampras.

This was also the date when 'The Last Dance' Chicago Bulls shut down the Utah Jazz in emphatic fashion in 1998.

Take a look at events that previously happened on this date through the years.

 

1996 - Chavez's century ends in defeat

Julio Cesar Chavez and Oscar De La Hoya were both multi-weight world champions during their careers and a fight between the two was highly anticipated in 1996.

De La Hoya, who owned a 21-0 record heading into the bout, was 10 years younger and facing an opponent who was fighting for the 100th time, Chavez having won 97 of the previous 99.

However, the light-welterweight contest was short-lived, falling way short of the hype as Chavez suffered a serious cut in the opening round and eventually succumbed to a barrage in the fourth, unable to continue after De La Hoya's left hook broke his nose.

Chavez would fight for another seven years, however, finishing with a 107-6-2 record, while De La Hoya retired in 2008 following losses to Floyd Mayweather Jr and Manny Pacquiao.

 

1998 - Jazz fail to hit the right notes as Bulls gain Finals advantage

The series was finely poised at 1-1 when the Bulls and Jazz tipped off in Game 3 of the 1998 NBA Finals.

What followed was the most dominant victory in Finals history as the Bulls won by 42 points, 96-54, as Utah scored what was at the time the lowest total in an NBA game since the inception of the shot clock.

Despite Karl Malone's 22 points, the Jazz went 13-of-59 from the floor as Dennis Rodman, Scottie Pippen and the rest of Chicago's defense delivered a performance that swung the series in their favour.

Chicago would go on to win the Finals 4-2, delivering a second three-peat to end a glorious run in the Windy City for Michael Jordan and Phil Jackson.

2009 - Finally for Federer

Having already triumphed at the other three slams, a French Open title had evaded Federer, thanks mainly due to the presence of Rafael Nadal.

However, in 2009 the Spaniard was suddenly out of the picture after a shock fourth-round loss to Soderling, who would go on to set up a final against Federer.

The showdown proved a mismatch; Federer eased to a 6-1 7-6 (7-1) 6-4 triumph in under two hours to win his 14th grand slam title.

In doing so he equalled Sampras' all-time record, with Federer eclipsing the American's haul with victory at Wimbledon later that year when he overcame Andy Roddick in an epic encounter.

Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra said "we can't stand for the systemic racism, social injustice and police brutality against the black community anymore" following George Floyd's death.

There have been nationwide protests in the United States after Floyd – an African-American man – died in police custody in Minneapolis last week.

A police officer was filmed kneeling on Floyd's neck during an arrest after he was crying out for help as he was handcuffed and pinned to the ground.

Spoelstra spoke out on Saturday, telling members of the South Florida media: "I mean we just simply can't stand for the systemic racism, social injustice and police brutality against the black community anymore. And it's really about standing up for what's right versus what's wrong."

"When [wife] Nikki and I first saw the visuals, we were horrified and disgusted. Then we got really deflated and deeply saddened that this was still happening in our country in the year 2020. In the last 10 days or so, I've really spent the time listening, educating myself, trying to gain more perspective and really reflecting on everything that's been happening.

"It's really about standing up for what's right versus what's wrong. And the other thing is that it really is a call to action. We have an opportunity to be part of a movement to finally impact change. My family and I are all in on this fight. The Miami Heat are all in on this fight. This is not a time to be silent or stand on the sidelines."

Spoelstra, whose Heat team are preparing for the NBA to restart in July following the coronavirus pandemic, added: "I think it's gonna take a sincere empathy and compassion for people of all races, to really reflect and process on the true history of the black community in this country.

"The history has been filled with incredible oppression and we really have to acknowledge that, to start to change the lens of how we see true equality. My wife and I have been really taking this opportunity to really have these conversations, talk to our friends, and really reflect deeply on all of this."

"I think more people are understanding that silence is not acceptable," Spoelstra said. "And the platform our players have is truly an opportunity to move people into action. Everything that's happened is just not right and it's going to take people getting uncomfortable."

"Every time something has happened, your heart breaks," Spoelstra continued, addressing the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Florida in 2012.  "Our community and our players have been so incredible in using their voices and platforms previously. With Trayvon Martin, we all thought when our players took that iconic photo and the players had the idea of doing that on their own to really bring it to light to everybody that this is wrong. We all thought that was going to move the needle, and it didn't, and it broke your heart.

"Then when it happens over and over and over, what this is going to require is not even trying to evaluate. It's just put your head down and get into this fight and make it happen this time. There is momentum. I'm inspired by -- what are we going on? -- 12 straight days of protest and the protests are becoming with the younger generation. They are uniting and inspiring and they're becoming less violent. The voices and the conversations and the subject, it can't go away. We have to keep on pushing it forward."

Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra said his team are "extremely motivated" in their pursuit of glory ahead of the NBA's return.

The coronavirus pandemic forced the 2019-20 NBA season to be postponed in March, but the league is set to restart in July.

The NBA has confirmed plans for 22 teams to relaunch the 2019-20 season, with a tentative resumption date of July 31.

Teams are set to stay at Walt Disney World Resort near Orlando, Florida and have all their games and practices on the campus after the NBA's Board of Governors approved proposals for a restart after the COVID-19 crisis.

The Heat are among the 22 teams due to head to Florida as one of the 16 franchises that occupied playoff spots when the season was halted, with the six teams that are within six games of the eighth and final seeds in the Eastern and Western Conferences also set for Walt Disney World Resort.

"I think our team is extremely motivated to get back at this," Spoelstra told reporters on a teleconference call on Saturday.

"These have been extreme circumstances these last two months-plus. And our guys have done a really commendable job of staying physically fit. But it is a challenge when you don't know whether we're going to start back up or not, or you don't necessarily know what date that it could be.

"Well, now, this gives us a little bit of specificity, and I think everybody is starting to get excited. And you're able to wrap your mind around a concept of replaying."

The Heat (41-24) were fourth in the Eastern Conference, behind the NBA-leading Milwaukee Bucks (53-12), defending champions the Toronto Raptors (46-18) and the Boston Celtics (43-21), and ahead of the Indiana Pacers (39-26) and Philadelphia 76ers (39-26).

"Will it be different? Yes. It's also exciting, I think," Spoelstra said. "A lot of people could use sports right now, NBA basketball and competition on TV.

"You know, I've heard it probably like anybody else, 'Well, does this mean the World Championship this year, there will be an asterisk next to it?' Yeah, I think, if you can make it through all of this and be worthy of winning that championship and really earning it, this will be one that'll probably be remembered more than any other. It has been that kind of year, this year."

San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said he is "embarrassed as a white person" that George Floyd could die in police custody in such a "nonchalant…casual" manner. 

The Spurs, one of the last NBA teams to issue an official reaction to Floyd's death and ensuing protests against racial injustice, released a series of videos on Twitter, including one from Popovich. 

Floyd, an African American, died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25 when an officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. 

"It has got to be us, in my opinion, that speak truth to power and that call it out no matter what the consequences," Popovich said. 

"We have to speak. We have to not let anything go."

While the series of videos is the first official response from the franchise, Popovich had previously provided scathing comments about Donald Trump to The Nation, calling the president "deranged" and "a destroyer".

 Popovich added in the video before an emotional pause. "I think I'm just embarrassed as a white person to know that that can happen – to actually watch a lynching."

The 24th-year coach concluded that white people need to do a better job, saying, "We have to do it because black people have been shouldering this burden for 400 years. 

"The only reason this nation has made the progress it has is because of the persistence, patience and effort of black people. 

"It's easy for people to let things go because it doesn't involve them. Our country is in trouble and the basic reason is race."

The Chicago Bulls will not make a decision anytime soon about head coach Jim Boylen's future with the franchise. 

Arturas Karnisovas, the Bulls' new executive vice president of basketball operations, began Saturday's conference call with reporters by issuing a statement on the divisive coach. 

"I know that you are anxious for me to comment definitively on our future of the Chicago Bulls. I understand that anticipation," Karnisovas said. 

"That said, I take pride in being deliberate and thoughtful in my decision-making and take the weight of my decisions seriously. 

"I'm not inclined to make evaluations prematurely to satisfy our excitement to move this team forward."

Karnisovas was hired in April – more than a month after the NBA season was paused due to the coronavirus outbreak – and he has yet to see his team play since joining Chicago. 

One reason for the patient approach, he said, was the NBA's 22-team plan for concluding the season, which excludes the Bulls. 

"We want to spend time internally to assure that we are thorough in our appraisals," Karnisovas said. 

"Our intention was to return to play at some point and have the opportunity to make informed decisions. There are several unprecedented circumstances beyond our control. 

"We have been limited in certain obvious ways, so our objective is to use this time in innovative ways to create opportunities for our players and coaches to encourage development."

Boylen took over as head coach 24 games into the 2018-19 season after the dismissal of Fred Hoiberg, but the Bulls are just 39-84 under Boylen. 

Chicago finished this season 22-43 – 11th in the Eastern Conference – and ranked 26th in the NBA in scoring at 106.8 points per game. 

"Coaching in the league is very difficult. To make a decision about coaching is really hard. It's probably the hardest thing for executives," Karnisovas said. 

"So I look at a lot of aspects – I've had numerous conversations. 

"That said, I'd like to be in a building, to be in practices, to be around the coaching staff in meetings. We're looking forward to getting in the video room together, analyse the games, to watch games together."

Karnisovas, previously the general manager of the Denver Nuggets, has already replaced Chicago's former top executives Gar Forman and John Paxson. 

Marc Eversley will take over as the team's new general manager, while assistant general manager J.J. Polk and vice president of player personnel Pat Connelly were also added this offseason. 

Zach LaVine is upset that the Chicago Bulls will not be part of the 22-team tournament that will restart the NBA season.

The 2019-20 campaign has been on hold since March because of the coronavirus pandemic, but on Thursday plans to recommence the league in Florida next month were approved.

However, only 22 teams will head to Orlando - the 16 teams currently occupying the playoff spots and the six that are within eight games of the eighth seeds in each conference.

Chicago, who had a 22-43 record when the season was halted, missed the cut-off by two games, much to LaVine's frustration.

"It sucks," he told reporters.

"You've got to understand it. It's a weird time, especially with everything that's going on right now, but it's upsetting too.

"We weren't even good enough to get to the play-in game, so it's upsetting and it just shows that we've got to do a lot of things differently to get ourselves that recognition to get to that spot."

With the 2020-21 season not due to start until December, players like LaVine will have gone nine months without playing a competitive game.

However, those whose teams are still alive this season will have to live at a campus and remain on site for all practices and games under the NBA's proposals.

That scenario brings its own concerns, according to LaVine's team-mate Thaddeus Young.

"For me, it's two-fold. Obviously, I wanted to play. I wanted to be a part of it," he said.

"But another side of me was worried about being away from my family or if they were to even come down. Just me being around everybody in general, playing basketball and then going back to my family and not knowing if I contracted the virus. Or not knowing if my family contracted the virus.

"As I said before, I have two young kids and I have a wife and my major concern is their health.

"Me, personally, I think I can fight it off, but I don't know if my kids would be able to do that. I don't know if my wife would be able to do that. So I don't want to put them in harm's way."

Barcelona great Xavi bade farewell in style on this day five years ago as he claimed a fourth Champions League title.

Elsewhere on June 6, Brian Lara set the cricket record books alight in the midst of a phenomenal 1994 purple patch, while an icon of the tennis world has great memories of this day in 1999.

Here we look back on those and some other landmark sporting moments.

 

1994 - Lara racks up 501

West Indies batsman Lara apparently did not satisfy his unquenchable thirst for runs when scoring a Test record 375 against England in Antigua.

On English soil two months later, he scored 501 not out for Warwickshire against Durham, surpassing Hanif Mohammad's 499.

It could have been very different as Lara made an uncertain start – bowled off a no ball on 12 and then dropped by wicketkeeper Chris Scott.

The Durham gloveman's error proved unfathomably costly as Lara smashed 62 fours and 10 sixes to reach his still unsurpassed milestone from 427 deliveries. Starting with the 375, it was his seventh century in eight first-class innings.

 

1997 - Rose finally blooms

Considering his breakout performance as a teenager at the Open Championship came in 1998, Justin Rose had to bide his time when it came to waiting for first PGA Tour title.

However, he took the opportunity in style when his moment came at the 2010 Memorial Tournament.

Four strokes off the lead at the start of the final day, Rose shot an imperious 66 to finish on 18 under and win by three strokes from Rickie Fowler.

In 2013, the Englishman claimed his maiden major triumph at the U.S. Open.

 

1999 - Agassi completes career Grand Slam

Andre Agassi's designs on completing tennis' career Grand Slam appeared to be slipping through his fingers when he fell two sets behind to Ukraine's Andrei Medvedev in the final of the 1999 French Open.

But he stormed back to complete a 1-6 2-6 6-4 6-3 6-4 triumph, converting a fourth match point in the decider. It made Agassi the first man in 30 years to win all four grand slams.

"It's been a lot of years since I've had this opportunity and I never thought I would see this day," he said, having won Wimbledon in 1992, the 1994 US Open and the 1995 Australian Open.

That Roland Garros triumph sparked a late career surge from Agassi, who lost the Wimbledon final to Pete Sampras and won a second US Open later that year, preceding a trio of Australian crowns in 2000, 2001 and 2003.

 

2001 - Iverson steps over Lee

In 2001, Iverson produced one of the greatest moments in NBA Finals history.

With less than a minute of overtime remaining, Philadelphia 76ers star Iverson made a 16-foot jump shot that Tyronn Lue of the Los Angeles Lakers leant in to contest.

As the ball dropped through the hoop, Lue lost his footing and Iverson mockingly stepped over him in celebration – an iconic image that sits uneasily with its main protagonist.

“I don’t like it [people making fun of Lue] because I love him," Iverson told ESPN in 2016. "I don’t like people joking on him and all that, because that’s my man."

The Lakers collectively had the last laugh, storming back from their opening night reverse to take the series 4-1. Iverson top scored for the 76ers in each game and ended the Finals with 178 points – a record for a five-game series.

 

2015 - Barca complete 'MSN' treble

Luis Enrique's fabulous Barcelona side – inspired by the MSN forward line of Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar – completed their 2014-15 treble with a 3-1 Champions League final win over Juventus in Berlin.

Ivan Rakitic gave the Catalan club an early lead but Alvaro Morata levelled for Juve 10 minutes after the interval.

Suarez restored the advantage midway through the second half before Neymar made sure of victory deep into stoppage time.

For Xavi, it amounted to the perfect farewell at his boyhood club, having also lifted the Champions League in 2006, 2009 and 2011.

Kevin Durant made it clear on Friday that he will not make his Brooklyn Nets debut if the NBA season restarts.

Durant ruptured an Achilles tendon a year ago for the Golden State Warriors in Game 5 of the NBA Finals against the Toronto Raptors.

There was speculation that he could return with the league forced to suspend operations for several months due to the coronavirus pandemic.

However, Durant ruled out returning this season, meaning his Nets debut will have to wait until 2020-21.

Speaking to The Undefeated, Durant said: "I don't plan on playing at all.

"We decided last summer when it first happened that I was just going to wait until the following season. I had no plans of playing at all this season."

The 10-time All-Star announced his decision to sign a four-year, $164million deal with the Nets in June last year.

Durant also had COVID-19 earlier this year.

Michael Jordan and Jordan Brand will be donating $100million to organisations that support racial equality, they announced in a joint press release on Friday.  

NBA great Jordan and his Nike-affiliated company began the release, "The Jordan Brand is us, the Black Community."

The donations will be made over the next 10 years, going to organisations "dedicated to ensuring racial equality, social justice and greater access to education."

The announced donations are the latest and largest corporate response to date in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd. 

Floyd, who was African American, died in the custody of a white police officer in Minneapolis on May 25, sparking protests against police brutality and racism across the United States and worldwide.  

"Black lives matter. This isn't a controversial statement," the press release said. "Until the ingrained racism that allows our country's institutions to fail is completely eradicated, we will remain committed to protecting and improving the lives of Black people." 

Jordan, who was criticised at times during his playing career for not being more of an activist, is now the majority owner of the Charlotte Hornets.  

Forbes estimates that Jordan is worth over $2billion and is the fourth-wealthiest African American.  

"Jordan Brand is more than one man. It has always been a family," the statement said. "We represent a proud family that has overcome obstacles, fought against discrimination in communities worldwide and that works every day to erase the stain of racism and the damage of injustice."

The company plans to continue its Jordan Wings Program, which has provided college funding for over 1,800 students in the U.S. and China.  

The NBA may be coming back next month, but Vince Carter will likely not be returning to the court again.

Only the 22 teams with the best records will recommence the 2019-20 season in Florida, with the campaign now officially over for eight clubs, including Carter's Atlanta Hawks.

The 43-year-old became the first man to play an NBA game in four different decades earlier this year, but he had also confirmed this would be his final season before retirement.

Though 'Vinsanity' will not be afforded the farewell many of his peers received, we take a look at the eight-time All-Star's brilliant career using Stats Perform News numbers.

 

LONGEVITY

Carter entered the league in 1998 having been drafted fifth overall and he played in 50 games for the Toronto Raptors during a lockout-shortened campaign, during which he won Rookie of the Year.

Incredibly, the guard has barely missed any significant time over the past 22 years - only sitting out the final 22 games of the 2001-02 season and the start of the following term due to injury - and he started all 82 games for the New Jersey Nets in 2006-07.

In all, Carter has played 1,541 games - third-most of all time - a total only Robert Parish and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar can better, and he was only 20 appearances away from moving up to second on the list.

The honour of playing in the most NBA seasons does belong to Carter, though, as this campaign was his 22nd, one more than Parish, Kevin Garnett, Dirk Nowitzki and Kevin Willis.

 

JOURNEYMAN

Unlike Dallas Mavericks icon Nowitzki - the NBA's ultimate one-team man - and Garnett, who represented only three clubs, Carter has called almost a third of the NBA home at one point or another.

After lengthy spells with the Raptors and Nets, Carter played for the Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, Mavericks, Memphis Grizzlies and Sacramento Kings before arriving in Atlanta in 2018.

Of those to have played for eight NBA teams, Carter's 25,728 points are 6,314 more than anyone else, with Jamal Crawford next on that list ahead of Otis Thorpe and Willis.

Carter has played at least 50 games per season at each of those eight stops, another record he holds along with others such as Crawford and Matt Barnes.

 

POINTS

Naturally given such longevity, it is no surprise to see Carter flying high on all-time points lists too.

His 25,728 points are the 19th-most of all time, more than notable names such as Reggie Miller, Patrick Ewing and Charles Barkley.

Moreover, Carter is a top-five scorer for two different franchises - the Nets (where he has the third-most points ever) and the Raptors (where he has the fourth-most). Others to own that distinction include Chris Bosh (the Raptors and Miami Heat) and LeBron James (Cleveland Cavaliers and Heat).

Carter's accuracy from beyond the arc certainly helped his numbers, as he drained 2,290 three-pointers - sixth-most of all time - from 6,168 attempts - fifth-most of all time.

He may not get the rapturous send-off his career deserves, but Carter's impact on the NBA over the past two-and-a-bit decades has certainly been felt.

The NBA G League announced on Thursday that it has cancelled the remainder of its suspended 2019-20 season.

The decision came shortly after the NBA Board of Governors approved a plan to restart its season with a 22-team format at the Walt Disney World complex near Orlando, Florida. The NBA paused its season on March 11 due to the coronavirus outbreak, with the G League doing so the following day. 

The G League, the NBA's primary developmental league, was scheduled to end its regular season on March 28. According to The Athletic, the league paid its players in full for the 17 canceled days and extended their health benefits.  

"While canceling the remainder of the season weighs heavily on us, we recognise that it is the most appropriate action to take for our league," G League president Shareef Abdur-Rahim said in a statement. "I extend my sincere gratitude to NBA G League players and coaches for giving their all to their teams and fans this season. And to our fans, I thank you and look forward to resuming play for the 2020-21 season." 

The Wisconsin Herd, the affiliate of the Milwaukee Bucks, finished with the league's best record at 33-10. Herd guard Frank Mason was the top scorer at 26.4 points per game. 

Rafael Nadal has celebrated plenty of times on Court Philippe Chatrier, but the jubilation he felt on June 5, 2005 is likely to live with him forever.

It was on this day 15 years ago when 'The King of Clay' won the first of his, to date, record 12 French Open titles.

Novak Djokovic and Francesca Schiavone were also crowned champions on June 5 in years gone by, while Michael Jordan produced one of the shots of his career in the 1991 NBA Finals.

Here we take a look at the most memorable sports events to have occurred on June 5.

 

1991 - Mid-Air Jordan switches hands for stunning lay-up

At this point 29 years ago Jordan was still the nearly man; a two-time MVP who had yet to win a championship ring.

The Chicago Bulls had lost Game 1 of the 1991 NBA Finals to the Los Angeles Lakers too, but they would level the series at home with a convincing 107-86 victory in Game 2 as Jordan scored 33 points.

But his display that night is best remembered for a single shot in the third quarter. Jordan drove towards the basket ready for a right-handed dunk, only to switch the ball into his left hand in mid-air upon seeing Sam Perkins and somehow flip a shot up off the glass and through the net to astound those in Chicago Stadium.

The Bulls would go on to win the series 4-1, beginning a dynasty that would see them dominate the NBA for most of the next decade.

 

2005 - Nadal begins French Open dominance

At this point 15 years ago Nadal was still a promising teenager hoping to win his first grand slam.

However, he was considered the favourite in the final against Mariano Puerta, having won three clay-court tournaments in the build up to the French Open and, despite dropping the first set, he would emerge victorious 6-7 (6-8) 6-3 6-1 7-5.

Nadal has won all but three French Opens since, though on June 5, 2016, it was Djokovic lifting the trophy as he beat Andy Murray in four sets to complete a career grand slam.

 

2009 - England stunned in World Twenty20 opener

Eleven years ago England suffered one of their most humiliating losses in any format.

In the opening game of the second World Twenty20 tournament, the hosts were expected to encounter few difficulties against the Netherlands at Lord's.

With England, who failed to hit a single six, having made 162-5 first up after being restricted to 73 in the second half of their innings, it came down to the chasing side needing two off the final ball to clinch a famous victory.

And they got them in farcical fashion as Stuart Broad's overthrow allowed Edgar Schiferli to scamper through for a second, sealing an incredible four-wicket win for the Netherlands.

 

2010 - Schiavone makes grand slam history

Tennis fans had become accustomed to the sight of Nadal winning grand slams by 2010 when Schiavone became the first Italian woman to reach a major singles final.

The 17th seed was up against Australia's Sam Stosur – who had beaten Justine Henin and Serena Williams along the way – and it was Schiavone who came out on top 6-4 7-6 (7-2).

Schiavone not only became the first Italian woman to win a grand slam singles title, but she was also the second-lowest ranked woman to win at Roland Garros in the Open era.

The NBA is moving closer to resuming its season with key dates being revealed, but one issue that remains is what to do about older coaches and staffers who are particularly vulnerable to coronavirus.

As the NBA heads to the Walt Disney Resort in Orlando to resume the season, commissioner Adam Silver expressed concern for some of the league's older coaches such as Gregg Popovich, 71, Mike D'Antoni, 69, and Alvin Gentry, 65.

"There are people involved in this league, particularly coaches, who are obviously older people," Silver said during an interview on TNT on Thursday. "We're going to have to work through protocols, for example, and it may be certain coaches may not be able to be the bench coach.

"They may have to maintain social-distancing protocols, and maybe they can be in the front of a room, a locker room, or a ballroom with a white board, but when it comes to actual play we're not going to want them that close to players in order to protect them. So those are all issues that we are continuing to work through."

While extra safety precautions may be necessary to keep older coaches safe, having them stay away from the bench area appears to be one the league is considering.

Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle, president of the NBA Coaches Association, said he spoke with Silver.

"The health and safety of our coaches is first and foremost. It's entirely possible that an NBA coach in his 60s or 70s could be healthier than someone in their 30s or 40s," Carlisle said in a statement.

"The conversation should never be solely about a person's age. Adam assured me that we would work through this together to help determine what is both safe and fair for all our coaches."

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