National Basketball Players Association president Chris Paul said players were eager to return when it is safe to do so.

The NBA season was suspended in March due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 308,000 people worldwide.

The United States has been hardest hit by COVID-19, recording more than 1.4 million cases with a death toll exceeding 88,000.

Oklahoma City Thunder guard Paul said players were eager to return to action, telling ESPN on Friday: "Obviously we want to play.

"Oh man, we want to play. We want to play bad. I think that's the consensus among the guys around the league.

"We want it to be obviously as safe as possible, but the biggest thing is, we miss the game."

Paul said it was up to players and officials to work out a plan if they are to get back underway amid the risk.

"What is normal now? So I think that's what we're trying to figure out, what it looks like, so until we find those answers and we can come up with an actual plan, right now it's basically sit and wait," he said.

"The virus is in control."

Arsenal completed a remarkable feat on May 15, 2004.

It is the day that Gunners vintage of 16 years ago secured its 'Invincibles' tag, finishing the Premier League campaign unbeaten.

Real Madrid – inspired by Zinedine ZIdane – and Manchester United also have happy memories of this mid-May date, each sealing continental silverware in 2002 and 1991 respectively.

And in the NBA, Allen Iverson claimed a significant personal honour 19 years ago.

Here are the sporting highlights from this day in history...

 

2004 – Arsenal become the 'Invincibles' 

Having clinched the title on enemy soil by drawing at Tottenham in late April, Arsene Wenger's men reached the last day still boasting an unblemished top-flight record.

Leicester City were the visitors to Highbury, seeking to become the ultimate party poopers. 

When Paul Dickov put the Foxes ahead, there was a genuine fear the hosts would fall at the final hurdle.

Thierry Henry levelled from the penalty spot and Patrick Vieira secure the win as Arsenal rounded off an unbeaten Premier League campaign.

2002 – Zidane's brilliance leads Real Madrid to glory

Zidane took centre stage when Glasgow's Hampden Park played host to the Champions League final on this day in 2002.

The Frenchman's stunning volley from just inside the box proved to be the winning goal in a 2-1 Madrid triumph over Bayer Leverkusen.

When Roberto Carlos hooked a hopeful ball into the area, Zidane positioned himself underneath it and expertly thrashed home a sweet left-footed strike.

Zidane's stunning finish is regarded as one of the all-time great Champions League goals.

 

2001 – Iverson is named NBA MVP 

Iverson followed in the footsteps of a bona fide legend with the figures he posted to win the NBA MVP in 2001.

He led the NBA in scoring (31.1 points per game) and steals (2.51 per game), becoming the first man to top both charts since Michael Jordan in 1992-93.

It made the vote a straightforward affair, the Philadelphia 76ers star receiving 93 of a possible 124 first-place votes to finish ahead of the San Antonio Spurs' Tim Duncan and Los Angeles Lakers star Shaquille O'Neal.

In doing so, Iverson became the first 76ers player to be crowned MVP since 1983, when Moses Malone achieved the feat.

 

1991 – Man Utd down Barcelona in European Cup Winners' Cup final

Mark Hughes scored twice in Rotterdam as Manchester United beat Barcelona 2-1 to win European silverware for the first time in 23 years.

Not since the club's 1968 European Cup success had United triumphed in a continental competition.

This was a first foray back into such tournaments for English clubs since the ban that come into force following the Heysel disaster.

Ronald Koeman scored Barca's consolation goal as Alex Ferguson got one over on opposite number Johan Cruyff.

Cleveland Cavaliers forward Tristan Thompson wants to see the NBA playoffs take place following the coronavirus outbreak.

The 2019-20 NBA campaign has been postponed since March due to the COVID-19 crisis, which has wreaked havoc globally – pushing the Olympic Games and Euro 2020 back a year.

At the time of postponement, Giannis Antetokounmpo and the Eastern Conference-leading Milwaukee Bucks (53-12) owned the best record in the league, ahead of LeBron James' Los Angeles Lakers (49-14), the Toronto Raptors (46-18) and Kawhi Leonard's Los Angeles Clippers (44-20).

It remains to be seen when, and if, the season will resume but Thompson said on Thursday: "Guys want to play."

The Cavaliers are an Eastern Conference-worst 19-46 and will miss the playoffs for the second consecutive season.  

Thompson, who is eligible for free agency after this season, was on a conference call last week with NBA commissioner Adam Silver and one of his biggest takeaways was that players – especially the ones with a chance to win a title – are eager to get back on the court as soon as possible. 

"They're trying to win a championship, so I understand where they're coming from and they know everybody wants to see basketball," Thompson – a 2016 NBA champion with the Cavaliers – said from Los Angeles.  

"Everybody wants to watch the playoffs. I want to watch the playoffs, with my friends, you know cheering and going crazy.

"But the main concern is just how do we do it in a way where everyone's at peace when they go to work."

With uncertainty amid the coronavirus pandemic, the NCAA announced on Wednesday that it will indefinitely push back its deadline for early entrants to the NBA Draft to withdraw and retain eligibility as student-athletes.

The initial deadline was June 3, and the NCAA plans to solidify a new date when the NBA finalises an outline for the 2020 pre-draft process.

The NBA announced on May 1 that it was postponing the draft lottery and combine, both set for May in Chicago. In the past, NCAA athletes had 10 days after the combine to withdraw their name from draft consideration to return to school.

"This modification is being made with the health and wellbeing of our student-athletes in mind, along with their ability to make the most informed decisions during this uncertain time," NCAA senior vice-president of basketball Dave Gavitt said in a statement.

The league has not yet voted on delaying the NBA Draft, set for June 25.

Florida followed in the footsteps of Arizona by announcing it is open to professional sports teams amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Arizona governor Doug Ducey opened the door for sport to return to the state without fans on Saturday following the COVID-19 outbreak, which has wreaked havoc globally.

The NBA, NHL and MLS seasons have been postponed, while the start of the 2020 MLB campaign has been delayed.

But Florida's Ron DeSantis became the second governor to clear the way for sport to resume on Wednesday.

"All these professional sports are going to be welcomed in Florida," DeSantis said in a news conference midweek. "That may not be the case in every other state in this country, as we've seen.

"So what I would tell commissioners of leagues is, if you have a team in an area where they just won't let them operate, we'll find a place for you here in the state of Florida. Because we think it's important and we know that it can be done safely."

The United States has been the hardest country hit, with more than 1.4 million confirmed cases and over 85,000 deaths.

Last week's UFC 249 event was held behind closed doors in Jacksonville, Florida, while WrestleMania 36 took place in Orlando.

"Our people are starved to have some of this back in their lives," DeSantis said Wednesday. "It's an important part of people's lives."

The Diamondbacks welcomed Arizona's announcement that professional sport can resume in the state without fans on Saturday amid the coronavirus pandemic.

COVID-19 has wreaked havoc globally, suspending the NBA and NHL seasons, while delaying the start of the 2020 MLB campaign.

The United States has been the hardest country hit, with more than 1.4 million confirmed cases and over 83,400 deaths.

But on Tuesday, Arizona governor Doug Ducey opened the door for sport to return to the state, albeit behind closed doors.

"We have had discussions with leaders with some of these leagues, and they all know they are welcome to operate, play and perform in the state of Arizona," Ducey said.

"It would be, at this point in time, according to the CDC guidelines, without fans. We could do that safely in the state of Arizona beginning May 16."

In a boost for MLB franchise the Diamondbacks, president Derrick Hall said in a statement: "I was pleased to hear the governor's comments on the state's willingness to allow sporting events in a controlled environment.

"We have been in constant communication and he has consistently shown cooperation and support to us and league leadership. Both he and I have made it clear we are more than willing to be part of a solution if there is a need for us to host more teams or games."

In a statement to the Arizona Republic, NFL team the Arizona Cardinals said: "We would still need the NFL to green-light the return to team facilities and resume activities."

Meanwhile, the NHL's Arizona Coyotes said: "We are aware of governor Ducey's announcement and will await direction from the NHL."

Cleveland Cavaliers forward Larry Nance Jr. said it is important for the NBA to crown a champion this season amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The 2019-20 NBA campaign has been postponed since March due to the COVID-19 crisis, which has wreaked havoc globally – pushing the Olympic Games and Euro 2020 back a year.

At the time of postponement, Giannis Antetokounmpo and the Eastern Conference-leading Milwaukee Bucks (53-12) owned the best record in the league, ahead of LeBron James' Los Angeles Lakers (49-14), the Toronto Raptors (46-18) and Kawhi Leonard's Los Angeles Clippers (44-20).

It remains to be seen when, and if, the season will resume but Nance believes those players vying for a championship ring should have the chance to try to etch their names in the history books.

"We're not in position to win a championship this year, but if I was – if I was Giannis, if I was LeBron, if I was Kawhi – if I was on one of those championship-calibre teams, I'd be pretty upset about it," Nance said via a conference call on Tuesday.

"Because it's very rare in this league that a chance like this comes along, and that's taken a valuable year off someone's career."

Nance and the Cavaliers are not in the playoff picture due to their 19-46 record in the Eastern Conference.

The 27-year-old Nance was traded to the Cavs by the Lakers in 2018 to team up with James in Cleveland as the franchise reached the NBA Finals, losing to the Golden State Warriors that season.

Mark Cuban will only reopen the Dallas Mavericks' facility when his players can be tested as frequently as White House officials are.

The NBA was suspended in dramatic fashion back in March when it emerged Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert had tested positive for coronavirus.

At the time, the Mavericks were playing the Denver Nuggets, and Cuban learned of the suspension while sat courtside during the game, with his stunned reaction going viral.

However, the NBA is now considering plans to restart the 2019-20 regular season, which was close to a conclusion, with a report on Tuesday suggesting players will be polled for their views.

The NBA has permitted practice facilities to reopen, provided they operate in states that have relaxed stay-at-home rulings, yet Cuban has insisted the Mavs' complex will remain closed regardless of directives from Texas officials.

To reopen it, Dallas' owner wants his players to have access to the level of testing US president Donald Trump and his senior advisors are afforded.

"I'll use the White House protocol," Cuban told The Athletic.

"The way the White House protects the president and vice-president is the way that I want to protect our players and employees, you know?

"We'll just try to just copy what they do as a means of knowing when the time is right. As of now, for all we know, for all we've been informed, anyways, they're testing everybody. And they test their top people on a daily basis.

"And so they have access to the best science, the best information, and so it just makes sense to me that we just copy them."

Asked whether he was optimistic if such testing would be available "in a month, two months", Cuban added: "Yes, absolutely.

"I just trust American exceptionalism, entrepreneurialism spirit and capitalism. You know, we'll figure out a way because we have to."

Count Zlatan Ibrahimovic among those who approve of Chicago Bulls great Michael Jordan's confrontational leadership style.

ESPN's docuseries 'The Last Dance', which looks at the 1997-98 Bulls team that three-peated, shone a spotlight on Jordan's treatment of team-mates in one of the recent episodes.

He revealed how he came to blows with current Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr during practice and used tough love to try and coax the best out of Scott Burrell.

"Winning has a price and leadership has a price," a choked-up Jordan said at the end of episode seven.

"I pulled people along when they didn't want to be pulled. I challenged people when they didn't want to be challenged.

"I earned that right because my team-mates came after me. They didn't endure all the things that I endured.

"Once you join the team you live at a certain standard that I play the game, and I wasn't going to take anything less."

That struck a chord with brash striker Ibrahimovic.

"Nice to see The Last Dance," he wrote on Twitter.

"Now you see how it is to play with a winner. Either you like it or not. If not then don't play the game."

Ibrahimovic is currently at Milan and has received praise from head coach Stefano Pioli, who likened his work ethic to that of 20-time grand slam winner Roger Federer.

However, the Swede has also been known to clash with former coaches and team-mates.

During his time in MLS with LA Galaxy, Joao Pedro said Ibrahimovic threatened to "kill" players following a loss to Houston Dynamo.

Sebastian Lletget also said it was "super frustrating" playing with Ibrahimovic at the Galaxy.

In the history of the FA Cup, basketball and rugby union, May 12 is a momentous sporting date.

Nineteen years ago today, Liverpool produced an unlikely revival in a memorable FA Cup final against Arsenal.

It is also the 35-year anniversary of a franchise-changing moment for the New York Knicks.

Here we look back at May 12 in the world of sport.

 

1975 - All Blacks legend Lomu born

One of New Zealand rugby's greatest sons was born 45 years ago today in Auckland.

Jonah Tali Lomu went on to become one of the most dominant players to pull on the famous All Blacks jersey.

He scored 37 Test tries for New Zealand and shares the record for most World Cup tries all-time, scoring 15 across just two tournaments.

A serious kidney disorder affected his playing career and he retired in 2007. Lomu passed away at the age of 40 from a heart attack related to his kidney condition.

1979 - Evert's clay-court streak stopped

Chris Evert won seven of her 18 grand slam titles at the French Open, with her dominance on the clay courts reflected by an incredible winning streak on the dirt.

Between 1973 and 1979, Evert won 125 successive matches on the clay, though she did not compete at Roland Garros in 1976, 1977 or 1978.

That remarkable run finally came to an end in the semi-finals of the Italian Open, as she lost a third-set tie-break to American compatriot Tracy Austin.

Any disappointment she felt from her streak finally being stopped was soon put to bed, however, as Evert reclaimed the French Open crown in the next month by crushing Wendy Turnbull in straight sets.

1985 - Knicks hit the jackpot with Ewing

The NBA used a lottery to determine the number one overall pick in the draft for the first time in 1985, and it was the New York Knicks who struck it lucky.

And the pay-off could hardly have been greater.

New York used the top selection on Georgetown center Patrick Ewing, who went on to become a superstar for the Knicks.

An 11-time All-Star, Ewing turned the Knicks into perennial championship contenders, but had the misfortune of his rise coinciding with that of Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

Ewing twice made it to the NBA Finals with the Knicks, but they lost to the Houston Rockets in 1994 and the San Antonio Spurs in 1999.

He later enjoyed spells with the Seattle SuperSonics and Orlando Magic. Ewing's number 33 is retired by the Knicks and he was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2008.

1989 - Guscott takes off with treble

England centre Jeremy Guscott's debut provided an indication of the great international career that was to come as they trounced Romania.

Guscott crossed for a hat-trick in a 58-3 victory in Bucharest, his efforts only outdone by Chris Oti going over four times.

However, it was Guscott who would go on to England stardom, scoring 30 tries in 65 caps.

Two years on from his bow, Guscott was playing in a World Cup final but came out on the losing side as England were beaten 12-6 by Australia at Twickenham.

2001 - Owen's dramatic late double downs Gunners

Liverpool's sixth FA Cup triumph proved a thrilling one as Michael Owen delivered glory with a late brace against Arsenal.

Freddie Ljungberg's opener looked to have won it for Arsenal, but Owen levelled matters seven minutes from the end of normal time.

He then completed a remarkable turnaround by racing onto a wonderful ball over the top from Patrik Berger and beating David Seaman with a fine left-footed finish.

Michael Jordan only tolerated competitive players and his team-mates needed "thick skin" to survive in Chicago, according to former Bulls guard Rusty LaRue.

The seventh episode of ESPN's docuseries 'The Last Dance' – a look at the 1997-98 Bulls team that three-peated – detailed Jordan's attitude towards other players and the notion he could not be a nice guy in practice because he was demanding.

"Winning has a price and leadership has a price," a choked-up Jordan said.

"I pulled people along when they didn't want to be pulled. I challenged people when they didn't want to be challenged.

"I earned that right because my team-mates came after me. They didn't endure all the things that I endured.

"Once you join the team you live at a certain standard that I play the game, and I wasn't going to take anything less."

LaRue was an NBA rookie that season with the Bulls, joining a Chicago team where the status quo had already been established with five championships in the previous seven seasons.

The former point guard revealed it was Jordan, arguably the greatest player of all time, who set the tone and he had no issues with his leadership style.

"By the time I had gotten with the team it was 'The Last Dance'," LaRue told Stats Perform.

"Everyone there had kind of been through the trials and understood the deal and knew what to expect.

"Obviously Mike's a competitive guy. I think everyone knew where they stood with him.

"You didn't make it with the Bulls organisation or that team with him if you weren't a competitive guy.

"All the guys that were there had kind of passed the test – for lack of a better term – and were in it for the right reasons and a piece of that team for different reasons.

"Michael, if he didn't think you were on board or weren't competitive, he certainly would ride you and you had to have thick skin.

"It didn't really bother me, I had high expectations for myself and I think any time you play with a competitor, they want you to compete.

"You're competing against them every day and you compete on a daily basis and you won't have any problems."

LaRue, who played college basketball alongside Tim Duncan at Wake Forest, was a role player with Phil Jackson's team that season and believes not being overawed by Jordan helped him make the Bulls roster.

"You know he's one of the greatest players – if not the greatest player – to ever play," LaRue added of Jordan.

"I think for me that was part of what helped me make the team, that I wasn't intimidated. I'm pretty confident in my abilities and I just kind of come and be who I am.

"I've always been a believer in you go in and compete to the best of your ability and let the chips fall where they may, that's what I did in that situation."

The transformation of Barcelona under Johan Cruyff took an important step forward on May 10, 31 years ago.

The Catalans won their first trophy since the great Cruyff's return to his old club, beating Sampdoria to claim the Cup Winners' Cup.

Liverpool became European champions for the second time on this day in 1978 as they defended the trophy by defeating Club Brugge.

More recently, May 10 has brought about historic achievements from Stephen Curry and Rafael Nadal.

 

1978 - Liverpool defend European Cup

Liverpool became the first English team to retain the European Cup in 1978 – and they did so at the national stadium, too.

A solitary goal from Kenny Dalglish in the second half secured a 1-0 victory over Club Brugge at Wembley in a game that was a far cry from the thrilling 4-3 aggregate win for Liverpool against the same opponents in the UEFA Cup final two years earlier.

The Reds will not have cared too much, though. It was their second European Cup triumph, following on from 1977's 3-1 defeat of Borussia Monchengladbach, and they would go on to lift the trophy twice more in the next six years.

 

1989 - Barcelona win Cup Winners' Cup to kick-start Cruyff legacy

Johan Cruyff was a legend as a Barcelona player, but he returned as coach during a time of real strife at his old club.

Within a year, he had secured his first trophy in charge, as the Catalans claimed a 2-0 victory over Sampdoria to lift the 1988-89 Cup Winners' Cup.

Goals in each half from Julio Salinas and Luis Lopez Rekarte were enough to seal the win and kick-start the sustained success of Cruyff's fabled 'Dream Team'.

By the end of the 1993-94 season, Barca had won four LaLiga titles in a row, a Copa del Rey, three Supercopas de Espana, the UEFA Super Cup of 1992 and the European Cup of the same year, where they beat Sampdoria again.

 

2016 - Curry becomes first unanimous NBA MVP in history

Stephen Curry led the Golden State Warriors to a historic 73-9 in a regular season in which they seemed to break records at will, only to lose the Finals 4-3 to the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Still, there was little argument against Curry being named MVP for the second year in a row. In fact, it seems there was no argument at all.

He swept all 131 first-place votes to become the first unanimous winner of the award in history, with Kawhi Leonard of the San Antonio Spurs a distant second.

2018 - Nadal breaks McEnroe record for consecutive set wins on single surface

Rafael Nadal is quite good at tennis on clay courts, if you were not aware.

Two years ago, he reminded everyone just how imperious he can be on the red dirt (if 12 French Open singles triumphs since 2005 was not proof enough).

By beating Diego Schwartzman 6-3 6-4 at the Madrid Open, Nadal broke the record for winning consecutive sets on a single surface. He reached 50 set wins in a row on clay, surpassing the 49 on carpet set by John McEnroe in 1984.

Remarkably, the run ended in rather meek fashion in his next match, as Dominic Thiem won their quarter-final 7-5 6-3.

The NBA is prepared to have its 2019-20 postseason go into October if necessary, according to Jared Dudley.

The 13-year NBA veteran and current Los Angeles Laker responded on Twitter to a comment that ESPN's Ramona Shelburne made on a radio show on Friday, where she said: "I don't think there is a drop dead-date. I think the folks I've talked to have said, 'We can go as long as we need'. I mean, they can be playing until Labor Day."

Dudley, one of the Lakers' players association representatives, responded to the tweet by saying that the NBA commissioner would be fine if the season finished even later. 

"I heard even [October] from Adam Silver today," Dudley tweeted on Saturday. 

The news comes a day after some teams were allowed to open their facilities to players for individual workouts, as long as the team's region had enough testing materials to screen asymptomatic players. 

While there is no definitive plan in place to return to the court just yet, the developments of recent days point to the NBA placing a large emphasis on finishing the 2019-20 season, even if it delays the start of next season until December or even January. 

The league has been under an indefinite hiatus since March 11, when Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert was the first major American athlete to test positive for COVID-19. 

Dudley's Lakers have the best record in the Western Conference at 49-14. 

Tom Brady joined LeBron James and a host of other sports stars from the United States in calling for a federal investigation into the fatal shooting of Ahmaud Arbery.

In February, Arbery was killed while out jogging through a residential area of Brunswick, Georgia in broad daylight.

Father and son Gregory and Travis McMichael were arrested and charged with murder on Thursday after mobile phone footage of the 25-year-old's death emerged. Gregory McMichael used to work for the local police department.

Brady was one of the players to sign a letter by the NFL Players Coalition, which was sent to US Attorney General William Barr.

The letter called for action in order to restore a measure of faith in America's justice system – citing the local investigation and a failure until this week to arrest or charge the McMichaels as problematic.

"We must strive to achieve the lofty but basic promise of equal justice, a promise on which our democracy depends," the letter read.

"Having the DOJ [Department of Justice] intervene in this case and lead the investigation immediately will help us move toward that goal.

"If it does not, but instead choses to turn its back on this obvious injustice, the DOJ will relinquish its role as the champion for the defenceless and send the unmistakable message that the federal government will not protect us from violence, prejudice and injustice in our communities."

Brady's former New England Patriots team-mate Julian Edelman and Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr were also among the 64 signatories.

On Twitter, James expressed his indignation over Arbery's death.

He wrote: "We're literally hunted EVERYDAY/EVERYTIME we step foot outside the comfort of our homes! Can't even go for a damn jog man!

"Like WTF man are you kidding me?!?!?!?!?!? No man fr [for real] ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!!!!

"I'm sorry Ahmaud (Rest In Paradise) and my prayers and blessings sent to the heavens above to your family!! #StayWoke #ProfiledCauseWeAreSimplyBlack"

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden also called for justice, saying the video showed Arbery was "killed in cold blood".

With 18 years having passed since Allen Iverson's famous "practice" rant, the former Philadelphia 76ers guard updated his comments to fit the modern day.

On May 7, 2002, Iverson, who was named NBA MVP in 2001 and would make 11 All-Star appearances in a Hall of Fame career, launched into a tirade when he was asked about skipping practice.

It remains one of the most iconic interactions between an NBA player and the media, and to mark the anniversary the former Sixers superstar recalled it with a slight tweak.

With the United States in the midst of combating the coronavirus pandemic, Iverson used it to attempt to remind his followers on Twitter of a key way they can help.

"We talkin about practicing social distancing!!!" he posted alongside a picture of him during his outburst.

For those unfamiliar with Iverson's initial comments, here they are:

"If a coach say I missed practice, and y'all hear it, then that's that. I might've missed one practice this year. But if somebody says, 'He doesn't come to practice' - it can be one practice, out of all the practices this year - that's enough. If I can't practice, I can't practice, man. If I'm hurt, I'm hurt. It ain't about that. It's not about that, at all.

"But it's easy to talk about, it's easy to sum it up when you just talk about practice. We sittin' in here, I'm supposed to be the franchise player, and we in here talkin' about practice. I mean listen, we talkin' about practice. Not a game, not a game, not a game. We talkin' about practice. Not a game, not the game that I go out there and die for, and play every game like it's my last. Not the game. We talkin' about practice, man. I mean how silly is that? We talkin' 'bout practice. I know I'm supposed to be there, I know I'm supposed to lead by example. I know that, and I'm not shovin' it aside, you know, like it don't mean anything. I know it's important, I do. I honestly do.

"But we talkin' about practice, man. What are we talkin' about? Practice? We talkin' about practice, man. We talk - we talkin' about practice. We talkin' about practice! We ain't talkin' about the game, we talkin' about practice, man. When you come into the arena, and you see me play, you see me play, don't you? You see me give everything I got, right? But we talkin' about practice right now. We talkin' about practice.

"Man look, I hear you, it's funny to me too. I mean, it's strange, it's strange to me too. But we talkin' about practice, man. We not even talkin' about the game, the actual game, when it matters. We talkin' about practice."

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