The Cricket World Cup group stage is over and the build-up to the semi-finals is under way.

Group winners India will take on New Zealand at Old Trafford on Tuesday, with hosts England facing rivals Australia at Edgbaston two days later.

With the feast of cricket coming towards its conclusion, we take a look back at some of the stats from the first round with the help of Opta.

 

BATSMEN

Most runs

1. Rohit Sharma (India) 647
2. David Warner (Australia) 638
3. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 606
4. Aaron Finch (Australia) 507
5. Joe Root (England) 500

Batting averages

1. Kane Williamson (New Zealand) 96.20
2. Rohit Sharma (India) 92.42
3. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 86.57
4. David Warner (Australia) 79.75
5. Samiullah Shinwari (Afghanistan) 74.00

Fours

1. Rohit Sharma (India) 67
2. David Warner (Australia) 64
3. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 60
4. Jonny Bairstow (England) 55
5. Babar Azam (Pakistan) 50

Sixes

1. Eoin Morgan (England) 22
2. Aaron Finch (Australia) 18
3. Rohit Sharma (India) 14
4. Chris Gayle (West Indies) 12
5. Jonny Bairstow (England) 11

Fastest hundreds (by deliveries)

1. Eoin Morgan (England) 57 v Afghanistan
2. Jos Buttler (England) 75 v Pakistan
3. Carlos Brathwaite (West Indies) 80 v New Zealand
4. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 83 v West Indies
5. Rohit Sharma (India) 95 v Pakistan

BOWLERS

Most wickets

1. Mitchell Starc (Australia) 26
2. Mustafizur Rahman (Bangladesh) 20
=3. Lockie Ferguson (New Zealand) 17
=3. Jaspirt Bumrah (India) 17
=3. Mohammad Amir (Pakistan) 17
=3. Jofra Archer (England) 17

Economy rate (from seven or more innings)

1. Colin de Grandhomme (New Zealand) 4.46
2. Mujeeb Ur Rahman (Afghanistan) 4.47
3. Jasprit Bumrah (India) 4.48
4. Mohammad Nabi (Afghanistan) 4.61
5. Ben Stokes (England) 4.65

Dot balls

1. Jofra Archer (England) 300
2. Pat Cummins (Australia) 295
3. Mitchell Starc (Australia) 288
4. Trent Boult (New Zealand) 284
5. Kagiso Rabada (South Africa) 273

Sixes conceded

1. Rashid Khan (Afghanistan) 14
2. Yuzvendra Chahal (India) 13
=3. Mohammad Nabi (Afghanistan) 10
=3. Adil Rashid (England) 10
=5. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 9
=5. Dawlat Zadran (Afghanistan) 9
=5. Glenn Maxwell (Australia) 9

Runs conceded

1. Mustafizur Rahman (Bangladesh) 483
2. Adil Rashid (England) 433
3. Mitchell Starc (Australia) 432
4. Gulbadin Naib (Afghanistan) 419
5. Mohammad Saifuddin (Bangladesh) 417

The Cricket World Cup semi-final spots have been decided, with India, Australia, England and New Zealand into the final four.

But what of the half a dozen teams not to make it through?

Some arguably performed better than expected, while some – we're looking at you, West Indies and South Africa – were hugely disappointing.

For fans of those two sides, our World Cup report card may not make for pretty reading…

 

PAKISTAN (5th, W5 L3 N/R1)
RATING: C+

Ahead of the tournament, all the talk focused on their inconsistency and Sarfraz Ahmed's side lived up to their billing, summed up by their opening thrashing by the West Indies followed by a superb victory over favourites England. They were outclassed by Australia and India but finished strongly, winning four straight matches and only missed out on the semis due to their inferior net run rate, irreparably damaged by that Windies hammering. Mohammad Amir was excellent with the ball, picking up 17 wickets, while Babar Azam showed his class with the bat and Haris Sohail's form made a mockery of Pakistan's earlier faith in spent force Shoaib Malik.

SRI LANKA (6th, W3 L4 N/R2)
RATING: C

The Lions looked massively under-strength coming in, but they could argue that successive washouts against Pakistan and Bangladesh cost them a fairer shot at a top-four finish. The undoubted highlight was their stunning win over England, where veteran seamer Lasith Malinga rolled back the years. At the other end of the scale, 21-year-old Avishka Fernando hinted at a bright future with a marvellous hundred against the Windies in a dead rubber.

SOUTH AFRICA (7th, W3 L5 N/R1)
RATING: E

Even for a country with a long history of Cricket World Cup calamity, South Africa will look back on this campaign as a particularly miserable one. From AB de Villiers' attempted retirement U-turn just before the squad was announced to losing premier quick Dale Steyn to injury, the Proteas were in disarray before game one. A solitary point from their first four matches left them with too much to do as the likes of Hashim Amla, Quinton de Kock and Faf du Plessis failed to fill the void left by De Villiers in the top order.

BANGLADESH (8th, W3 L5 N/R1)
RATING: B+

A superb campaign – belied by their final position in the table – spearheaded by the remarkable performances of all-rounder Shakib Al Hasan, who racked up 606 runs and took 11 wickets with his wily left-arm spin – the first player to score 500+ runs and claim 10+ dismissals at a World Cup. There were impressive wins against South Africa and West Indies while they ran New Zealand and India mighty close. On this evidence, the Tigers will be genuine contenders in India in 2023.

WEST INDIES (9th, W2 L6 N/R1)
RATING: F

Not bottom of the table, but certainly bottom of the class. A squad filled with giants capable of smashing 100-metre sixes and bowling 90+ mph, the Windies let themselves down badly at this tournament. An opening annihilation of Pakistan promised much, but – scintillating centuries from Carlos Brathwaite and Nicholas Pooran aside – they failed to show the required application. Andre Russell's fitness issues caught up with him midway through the tournament, while 39-year-old Chris Gayle's intention to reverse his retirement looked a mistake. It is time to blood some fresh talent.

AFGHANISTAN (10th, W0 L9)
RATING: D

They may have finished as the only side without a point, but it is not all doom and gloom for Afghanistan. The tournament's lowest-ranked team improved as the campaign progressed, giving India and Pakistan almighty scares in agonisingly narrow defeats. A change of captaincy shortly before the finals, as well as knee-injury victim Mohammad Shahzad arguing against the decision to send him home and Aftab Alam's banishment for a disciplinary violation, will certainly have proved unwelcome distractions. The next World Cup in sub-continental conditions will surely suit a side with four years' more experience.

After five arduous weeks, the Cricket World Cup group stage has reached its climax and four teams are left standing.

Hosts and pre-tournament favourites England briefly flirted with a disappointing early exit before rallying to beat India and New Zealand and reach the last four.

Lying in wait are old rivals Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday, while India and New Zealand will do battle first in Manchester in two days' time.

But before we sit back and take in the final acts of a hugely enjoyable tournament, let's review the thrills and spills (and a couple of comedy moments) of an enthralling group stage.

 

Rihanna delights in Durham

Over a decade ago, Rihanna's smash hit 'Umbrella' enjoyed an extended stay at the top of the UK album charts but there was no need for the brollies at Durham as West Indies faced off with Sri Lanka.

Unfortunately, the Barbados-born popstar saw the Windies beaten by 23 runs, but there was a tearful reunion with assistant coach Roddy Eastwick – a former school teacher of Rihanna's. 


Bees create buzz at The Riverside

An unbroken 175-run stand between Hashim Amla and Faf du Plessis stung Sri Lanka at The Riverside.

But it was a swarm of bees that created quite the buzz on social media. The honey-loving insects caused a sudden delay, with players having to hit the deck to take evasive action.


Roy clatters Wilson

We are very, very, very sorry Joel Wilson…but this was undoubtedly hilarious.

Jason Roy brought up a century in England's beating of Bangladesh but, while tracking the progress of the ball, did not see the poor, unaware umpire who was completely clattered by the opener in comical scenes.

Once back to his feet, a slightly sheepish Wilson saw the funny side.


Bairstow answers critics head on

England's defeats to Sri Lanka and Australia drew plenty of criticism at home, not least from Michael Vaughan, which led to an unsavoury back-and-forth with Jonny Bairstow.

But Bairstow responded in impressive fashion, making centuries against India and New Zealand to help England progress to the last four.

Celebrating that latter century, Bairstow rubbed his hair in a seemingly light-hearted jibe at Vaughan's previous treatment to bolster his hairline.


Stokes or Woakes?

Two stunning catches, but who did it better – Ben Stokes or Chris Woakes?

All-rounder Stokes plucked a stunning one-hander in the deep off Andile Phehlukwayo in the tournament's opening match between England and South Africa at The Oval.

Not to be outdone, Woakes took a brilliant full-length dive on the boundary to send Rishabh Pant packing in England's much-needed win over India. Superman, eat your heart out.


Hat-trick heroes

Afghanistan had the chance for a famous upset against India at the Rose Bowl. Twelve runs were needed off four deliveries…enter Mohammed Shami.

The paceman took the vital wicket of dangerman Mohammad Nabi and followed up with the scalps of Aftab Alam and Mujeeb Ur Rahman to end Afghanistan's hopes. Three wickets in three balls.

New Zealand lost out to trans-Tasman rivals Australia at Lord's, but Trent Boult had individual reason to celebrate with a hat-trick of his own.

A stunning finish in the final over of Australia's innings saw Usman Khawaja, Mitchell Starc and Jason Behrendorff fall to full, in-swinging deliveries.

Boult, who has donated the ball to the MCC Museum, had to endure a nervy wait after a Behrendorff review.


Starc brilliance takes down Stokes

England made a dismal start in their pursuit of 286 against Australia at Lord's, slumping to 53-4.

Ben Stokes' courageous 89 threatened a fightback at the Home of Cricket. That was until Mitchell Starc's unplayable yorker swung in late to rattle the base of the stumps to end Stokes' resilience and England's chances of victory.


Pakistan deny Afghanistan

Afghanistan finished without a point after the group games but will rue a couple of missed opportunities – not least versus Pakistan, who slumped to 156-6 chasing 228 at Headingley. 

But captain Gulbadin Naib gave up 18 costly runs in the 46th over and Pakistan edged home with a couple of balls to spare against the underdogs in a dramatic finale.


Farewell Chris

Chris Gayle's final World Cup did not exactly go to plan. The explosive batsman made 242 runs from nine innings as West Indies – fancied by many to challenge – crashed out.

His final knock against Afghanistan yielded just seven runs, but there was time for some typical flamboyance when the charismatic Gayle celebrated a low catch with some press-ups.

A tidy turn with his occasional off-spin also yielded 1-28 and the 39-year-old lapped up the acclaim at stumps.

Pakistan veteran Shoaib Malik has announced his retirement from ODI cricket after his side's World Cup campaign ended.

A 94-run win over Bangladesh at Lord's on Friday was not enough to see Pakistan force their way into the semi-finals at New Zealand's expense.

Malik, 37, did not play having lost his place in the side earlier in the tournament and he confirmed after the match he will no longer be available for selection in ODI cricket.

"As I mentioned in my previous interviews, whenever I gave interviews, that I'm going to retire from World Cup cricket. Today was our last game, and I'm retiring from ODI cricket," Malik said in a statement made at a news conference.

"I had planned this for a few years ago to retire on the last Pakistan World Cup match. I'm sad that I'll be leaving the format of cricket that I once loved, but happy that I'll have more time to spend with my family. This will also allow me to focus on Twenty20 cricket.

"I would like to thank some of the most important people whose support and backing helped me through these 20 years of international cricket.

"Starting with the players I shared dressing rooms with, all the coaches I have under, my friends and family, the media, my sponsors, the Pakistan cricket board and Pakistan sports board.

"But most importantly, my fans. I love you all. Thank you."

Malik insisted he is not disappointed to have made such little impact in his last World Cup, having taken a single wicket and scored only eight runs across three innings.

"I think, if you go through the whole thing, sometimes you come out with a performance, sometimes you don't," he added. 

"But, of course, it's a big platform and expectations were high, but you don't perform that spot of life. I think life never stops, and I'm pretty satisfied with my ODI career."

Malik will go down in history as a Pakistan great, having played 287 ODIs, scoring 7,534 runs at an average of 34.55.

He made his ODI debut in October 1999 and produced nine centuries in the format, also chipping in with 158 wickets.

Sarfraz Ahmed paid tribute to Pakistan fast bowler Shaheen Afridi after he posted his country's best Cricket World Cup figures in Friday's win over Bangladesh.

Pakistan were knocked out of the World Cup as their 94-run win was not a large enough victory to overhaul New Zealand but much of the focus was on teenager Shaheen, who took 6-35 runs to decimate the Bangladesh batting order.

Captain Sarfraz considered the display "one of the best" he had seen but suggested 19-year-old Shaheen has consistently been performing at a similarly lofty level in the past couple of weeks.

"The way Shaheen is bowling in the last four matches is very good," he said in the post-match presentation. "The consistency is amazing, with the line and length.

"Today he's taken six wickets and it was one of the best bowling performances I've ever seen."

Pakistan crashed out despite winning four consecutive matches to finish the group stage, at least giving Sarfraz cause for encouragement.

"It's very unfortunate that we've played really good cricket in the last four matches but we could not qualify," he said. "There was only the one match that cost us [in terms of run rate].

"Throughout the tournament, we've played very good cricket and the boys responded very well after the India match."

Bangladesh also bowed out despite Shakib Al Hasan's 606 runs moving him clear as the tournament's top scorer, prompting captain Mashrafe Mortaza to offer an apology to his star man.

"The whole team feel very sorry for him because we couldn't support him throughout the tournament, otherwise the team would have been in a different zone," he said.

"He batted exceptionally in almost every match, bowling very well, fielding well. I think he's been fantastic."

Mortaza later indicated he will take time to decide whether to continue his international career.

"My future plan is, obviously, going home from here, and I will have a think," he added.

Shaheen Afridi produced a superb six-wicket haul as Pakistan defeated Bangladesh by 94 runs on Friday but saw their increasingly improbable Cricket World Cup bid ended due to the margin of victory.

Following England's win against New Zealand earlier in the week, Pakistan required a record-breaking ODI triumph by more than 300 runs to pip the Black Caps to fourth and last semi-final spot.

And their slimmest of hopes were briefly kept alive as they batted first at Lord's.

But after 100 from Imam-ul-Haq - from exactly 100 balls - and 96 from Babar Azam helped Pakistan to 315-9, their elimination was sealed eight runs into the Bangladesh reply, in which the 19-year-old Shaheen (6-35) came to the fore in spectacular fashion.

Shaheen became the youngest bowler to record a World Cup five-for.

A second-wicket stand of 157 between Imam and Babar had set Pakistan on their way to a consolation victory, with that partnership ended as the latter went lbw to Mohammad Saifuddin.

Imam stuck around for another partnership of 66 with Mohammad Hafeez (27), setting the foundation for Imad Wasim's 43 off 26 a part of a frantic finish to the innings, Bangladesh's Mustafizur Rahman taking 5-75.

Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed, struggling with injury for a time, returned to keep in the Bangladesh innings but, after an opening maiden and a poor early Haris Sohail drop, the score reached 8-0 to seal his side's fate.

The Pakistan bowlers made sure to enjoy the final few hours of their World Cup, though, with Shaheen taking the wickets of Tamim Iqbal (8), Liton Das (32) and then the ever-impressive Shakib Al Hasan (64).

Shadab Khan removed Mosaddek Hossain to halt hopes of a Bangladesh revival, Shaheen then capitalising with a further two wickets in three deliveries to set up a comfortable finish, completed with his sixth.

 

BABAR PICK OF BATSMEN

The damage had been done for Pakistan prior to this match, but Babar should accept very little of the blame for their early exit. His tournament ended with 474 runs, which is more than any Pakistan player had previously managed at a single World Cup, passing Javed Miandad's 437 in a superb knock at Lord's that included 11 fours.

There was also a batting star in the Bangladesh ranks, however, as Shakib ended his World Cup as the leading run scorer on 606.

SHAHEEN SHINES WITH BALL

Mustafizur had taken three wickets in the final over against India last time out and this time contributed another pair at the same stage for a second consecutive five-for, earning a place on the Lord's honours board.

But Shaheen stole the limelight when it came to exciting young bowlers. His first ODI five-for blew Bangladesh away, and he then took an extra wicket to seal victory and post the best Pakistan figures in the tournament's history.

New Zealand are guaranteed the last Cricket World Cup semi-final spot after Pakistan's faint hopes were ended at Lord's on Friday.

The ICC Champions Trophy holders needed to beat Bangladesh by a record ODI total of over 300 runs in their final group match, but could only post 315-9.

Bangladesh then made the necessary eight runs to eliminate Pakistan without reply inside two overs, aided by an awful Haris Sohail catch.

Pakistan can match the Black Caps' tally of 11 points by beating the Tigers, yet they will bow out on net run-rate.

Imam-ul-Haq made 100 off as many balls and Babar Azam (96) broke Javed Miandad's record of 437 runs in a single World Cup after Sarfraz Ahmed won the toss.

Those brilliant knocks were in vain, though, and New Zealand will take on Australia or India in the last four next week.

Sarfraz suffered more pain when he was struck on the elbow by a straight drive from Imad Wasim, forcing the Pakistan captain to retire hurt with five overs remaining.

He returned for the final ball of the innings, however, and was keeping as his side were knocked out early in the Bangladesh innings.

Pakistan head into Friday's final Cricket World Cup group game against Bangladesh knowing the odds are stacked firmly against their semi-final qualification hopes.

Reaching the knockout stages remains a mathematical possibility for Sarfraz Ahmed's side following fourth-placed New Zealand's loss to hosts England on Wednesday. 

Yet, in reality, an improbable result of freak proportions will be required if the fifth-placed side are to overhaul a Black Caps team two points clear of them and with a superior net run rate.

If they are to stand any chance of extending their stay in England at all, they must bat first.

Should the toss go their way, they will then be required to record a victory of well in excess of 300 runs - 311 runs after posting 350 or by 316 runs after scoring 400 - in order to better New Zealand's net run-rate, which stands at +0.175 as opposed to Pakistan's score of -0.792.

Do not expect Bangladesh to be pushovers, however. They have proven tricky opponents throughout the tournament and in star all-rounder Shakib Al Hasan possess one of the top performers of this World Cup. 

Shakib has already claimed a place in the record books by becoming the first all-rounder in tournament history to score 500 runs and claim 10 wickets - and he is unlikely to be finished yet.


TOURNAMENT SO FAR

With four wins from their opening eight matches - including the scalps of England and New Zealand - there are plenty of positives for Pakistan to take from this World Cup. Consistency has evaded them, however, and there is an air of resignation to their fate.

It is a tournament which has delivered some memorable moments for Bangladesh too. That opening-match triumph over South Africa has set the tone for a series of spirited - and, on three occasions, winning - performances with the superb Shakib right at the very heart of it.


WHAT THEY SAID

Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed: "Definitely, we're interested in finishing on a high note. So we will try our best. It is very difficult - 316 runs is a big margin. Only if you're batting first, if you score 600 runs or 500 runs. I don't know what the study is behind [how positions are decided in future World Cups] but I can't do anything."

Bangladesh coach Steve Rhodes: "There's no such thing as a dead rubber. Both teams desperate to beat each other. We certainly are. I'm pretty sure they are. They've got a lot to play for as well. So, we're looking to obviously win. We want to win. So if we can take the scalp of Pakistan in the World Cup, we'll be very, very proud of the boys."


OPTA FACTS

- Bangladesh have won their last four men's ODIs against Pakistan. Prior to this, Pakistan had recorded 31 wins from 32 clashes against the Tigers, including 25 in a row.
- Pakistan have won their last three Cricket World Cup 2019 matches; after becoming champions in 1992 they have only managed more consecutive victories at a single edition twice (four in both 1999 and 2015).
- Shakib Al Hasan has scored 542 runs so far, the most by a Bangladeshi at a single edition; in the process he has recorded six scores of 50+, only Sachin Tendulkar has recorded more in an edition of the tournament (seven in 2003).
- This will be the second meeting between Pakistan and Bangladesh at a World Cup, the first match took place when the tournament was last held in England (1999, Bangladesh won by 62 runs).

Virat Kohli hailed Rohit Sharma and Jasprit Bumrah as "the best around" after they helped send India into the Cricket World Cup semi-finals.

India booked their last-four place with a 28-run win over Bangladesh on Tuesday, set in motion by Rohit's brilliant 92-ball 104 - his fourth century of the tournament.

A chase of 315 always looked beyond the Tigers, yet Bumrah made absolutely sure with a stunning spell to end the match, collecting wickets from consecutive balls to bowl Bangladesh out for 286.

In the post-match presentation, Kohli took the opportunity to pick out both players for individual praise.

"I have been watching [Rohit] for years now and I have been saying openly, in my opinion, he is the best one-day player around," the captain said.

"When he plays like that, it's a joy to watch. He's having the tournament of his life. We are so, so delighted to see him bat the way he is, because when he plays well, we know we are heading towards a big score.

"That's all we need in the changing room. When he plays like that with so much confidence, all the guys in the changing room get so much confidence watching him play.

"I'm really, really happy for him. He's really going well and hopefully, with three more games to go, he can put two big scores there."

Turning to top-ranked bowler Bumrah, Kohli continued: "Bumrah's overs were always going to be crucial, so that's why we stopped him after four overs initially.

"He is someone you can bank on at any time in the game. He's a world-class bowler, the best in the world at the moment. There's a good reason for that. He's been bowling consistently well."

Tamim Iqbal dropped Rohit early on, but Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza was not ready to acknowledge that moment as a turning point.

"With a batsman like Rohit Sharma in such good form, it obviously affects it," he said. "But that's what happens in cricket. We can't blame it just on that catch."

And Mortaza rued Bangladesh's failure to produce their own big-scoring partnership in the manner of Rohit and KL Rahul's opening stand.

"If one of them could have made 80 or 90 then it would have been a different match," he said. "With 47 and 41 [two of Bangladesh's three biggest stands], it's asking too much."

Rohit Sharma made his fourth century of the 2019 Cricket World Cup as India booked their place in the semi-finals with a 28-run victory over Bangladesh, who can no longer qualify for the last four.

Virat Kohli's men saw their unbeaten start to the tournament ended by England on Sunday, but they got back on track two days later, thanks largely to in-form opener Rohit striking 104 off 92 balls in another batting masterclass.

Bangladesh needed victory at Edgbaston to keep their slim hopes of progression alive, yet a chase of 315 proved beyond them as Hardik Pandya (3-60) and Jasprit Bumrah (4-55) starred with the ball.

An early Tamim Iqbal drop off Mustafizur Rahman allowed Rohit to build momentum alongside KL Rahul (77), the pair combining for the biggest opening partnership of the tournament so far, which finally ended on 180.

Rohit fell to Soumya Sarkar two balls after reaching his hundred and India were rocking slightly when captain Kohli (26) and Pandya were both dismissed by Mustafizur (5-59) within the space of three balls.

However, Rishabh Pant and MS Dhoni hit 48 and 33 respectively to help their side to a healthy total of 314-9, the latter one of three victims for Mustafizur in the final over of India's innings.

Bangladesh made a steady start in reply, but talisman Shakib Al Hasan was the only member of the top five to kick on, reaching 66 in a continuation of his fine form.

When Shakib fell to Pandya, who had earlier dismissed Sarkar and Liton Das, the Tigers were 179-6 in the 34th over and staring defeat in the face.

Mohammad Saifuddin showed admirable defiance on his way to 51 not out off 38 balls, while Sabbir Rahman also chipped in with 36 as Bangladesh fought to stay in the game.

Yet Bumrah, who earlier required treatment following an awkward fall at the boundary, starred in the closing overs to make sure India prevailed.

 

Rohit reigns again

Rohit now has more runs at this tournament than any other player. He moved through the gears after being dropped on nine by Tamim in the fifth over and helped India to their best powerplay of the campaign, before continuing at a great pace to seemingly take the game away from Bangladesh.

Pandya spell pivotal

Mustafizur and Shakib threatened to really make things difficult for India. First, the bowler took a brilliant five-for to give Bangladesh hope, then Shakib produced another fine knock, becoming the first player to score more than 500 runs and take 10 wickets in a World Cup. However, Pandya's three wickets - including that of Shakib - came at a key time to restore control and Bumrah then came into his own at the death.

David Warner dominated Bangladesh with the highest score of the Cricket World Cup as Australia took another stride towards the semi-finals with a 48-run victory at Trent Bridge.

Warner has been in outstanding form and moved to another level in Nottingham, capitalising on being dropped by Sabbir Rahman on 10 by smashing 166 off 147 balls to become the leading run-scorer in the tournament.

The opening batsman's explosive 16th ODI hundred was Australia's second-highest individual World Cup score - Warner having also posted the biggest of 178 versus Afghanistan four years ago.

Usman Khawaja (89) returned to form after Aaron Finch struck 53, with Soumya Sarkar taking 3-58 as the holders put 381-5 on the board in another Nottingham run-fest.

Mushfiqur Rahim (102 not out) made a brilliant first World Cup century and there were half-centuries for Tamim Iqbal (62) and Mahmudullah (69), yet Bangladesh were unable to pull off a repeat of their huge successful run-chase against West Indies on Monday.

The Tigers did post their highest ODI score of 333-8, but they nevertheless suffered a defeat that strikes a major blow to their hopes of reaching the last four as Australia went top of the table.

 

IMPERIOUS WARNER PUNISHES SABBIR

Sabbir was brought in to make his first appearance of the tournament as one of two changes to the Tigers side and he did not get off to the best of starts, putting Warner down at backward point before he had got going.

The left-hander made him pay in brutal fashion after biding his time, slog-sweeping Shakib Al Hasan for a massive six and bringing up his half-century in 55 balls.

Warner then accelerated with a magnificent combination of power and improvisation following Finch's exit, clearing the ropes five times and putting on 192 for the second wicket with Khawaja, who passed 50 for the first time in the tournament.

 

MUSHFIQUR AND MAHMUDULLAH PROVIDE RESISTANCE

Glenn Maxwell (32 from 10) also did some late damage after Warner and Khawaja had been dismissed by Soumya, who missed out with the bat when he was run out by Finch following a big mix-up.

The fit-again Marcus Stoinis (2-54) claimed the big wicket of the in-form Shakib (41) and the Tigers were 144-3 almost halfway through their innings when Tamim chopped on.

Mitchell Starc rattled Liton Das on the helmet straight after ending Tamim's knock and the number five was on his way after being trapped in front by Adam Zampa, but Mushfiqur and Mahmudullah made a game of it.

 

STARC AND AUSTRALIA RISE TO THE SUMMIT

Nathan Coulter-Nile (2-58) ended an 83-ball stand when Mahmudullah holed out after hitting three sixes and five fours in a swashbuckling 50-ball knock, while the Australia seamer compounded Sabbir's misery by bowling him first ball.

Starc (2-55) became the top wicket-taker in the tournament and, although the excellent Mushfiqur reached three figures in the penultimate over, Australia comfortably made it five wins out of six.

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza called on his team to follow Shakib Al Hasan's "exceptional" contributions after a match-winning turn against West Indies.

Shakib made an unbeaten 124 - his second century in a row - as Bangladesh completed their highest ODI run chase and ran out resounding seven-wicket winners in Taunton.

Liton Das (94 not out) and Tamim Iqbal (48) also weighed in, but Mortaza acknowledged Shakib, who became the tournament's highest-scoring player on Monday, has been the Tigers' star of the Cricket World Cup so far.

Bangladesh are up to fifth in the standings with five points from as many matches and more performances like Shakib's could boost their chances of making the semi-finals.

"He has made it at this World Cup and delivered for the team," Mortaza said in the post-match presentation. "Every match he has come and brought something really exceptional.

"Hopefully he'll keep going and others will join him. In the last two matches, Mushy [Mushfiqur Rahim] has batted so well; today, Tamim and Soumya [Sarkar (29)] started batting so well."

For Shakib, another strong batting display was just reward for his own hard work and a call to move up to number three.

"It feels great - obviously to stay at the wicket until the end was the most satisfying thing," Shakib said. "I've been working on my batting for the past month and a half and it's been paying off.

"I know that if I bat at number three I'll get more opportunities, I'll get more time to bat. Sometimes, if I bat at number five, I'll come in at the 30th over or the 40th over, which is not ideal for me. So I wanted to bat up the order."

Asked about the prospect of another ton against Australia on Thursday, he replied: "I hope so. It'll be tough, especially playing against Australia, who are picking up their form. We have to bring our A-game."

The Windies were particularly disappointing with the ball but beaten skipper Jason Holder felt the problems started with a total of 321-8.

"We just didn't get enough runs," Holder said. "But having said that, I still think we could have been a lot more disciplined with the ball and we let ourselves down in the field as well.

"It was just a situation where we never got the momentum we probably should in the middle overs. We had too much to do at the back end.

"If you score 320 here, you've got to fight really hard in the field to defend it. We didn't get wickets and we let one or two chances slip."

Shakib Al Hasan's superb Cricket World Cup continued as he compiled an unbeaten century to lead Bangladesh to an emphatic seven-wicket win over West Indies at Taunton.

The Tigers were undaunted by a target of 322, in-form all-rounder Shakib leading the way with 124 not out - a second successive hundred for the tournament's leading run-scorer - against a sluggish Windies attack.

Liton Das added an unbeaten 94, sharing 189 with Shakib on a memorable day for Bangladesh, who romped home with 51 balls to spare and leapfrogged Windies into fifth position in the group stage.

West Indies' own qualification hopes look increasingly slim and they got off to a poor start when opener Chris Gayle was caught behind off Mohammad Saifuddin (3-72) for a 13-ball duck.

Shai Hope (96 off 121 balls) and Evin Lewis (70 off 67) responded impressively to lay a strong platform, before Shimron Hetmyer (50 off 26) and skipper Jason Holder (33 off 15) raised the tempo in the latter stages of an innings that featured three wickets for Mustafizur Rahman and two for Shakib.

A total of 321-8 looked to have left Bangladesh facing a tall order, given no team had chased down more than 245 in the competition prior to Monday.

However, the Tigers got off to a quick start through openers Tamim Iqbal (48) and Soumya Sarkar (29), with the Windies looking lacklustre in the field, before Shakib took centre stage once again.

Having made 75, 64 and 121 in his previous three innings, Shakib maintained his fine form and found an able partner in Das, with the pair able to score freely all around the wicket.

The beleaguered Windies simply had no answer to Bangladesh's fourth-wicket pair, with Das even hitting Shannon Gabriel for three sixes in a row as his side closed in on a hugely convincing victory.

 

Tigers in the hunt for semis, Windies on the brink

Monday's result realistically preserved Bangladesh's hopes of reaching the semi-finals. They are up to fifth in the table, having beaten South Africa and the Windies in impressive fashion.

However, after a heavy defeat to England in their previous match, this was another dire performance from West Indies, whose bowling left much to be desired. Since thrashing Pakistan in their opening game, Holder's men have lost three matches and seen another rained off. It is hard to see them recovering from here.

 

Shakib reaches landmark 

What a tournament it has been for Shakib, who once again starred for Bangladesh here as well as passing the impressive milestone of 6,000 ODI runs. It was a world-class performance of real maturity and skill from the 32-year-old, who has relished the responsibility of stepping up in the batting order to number three. He also made a key contribution with the ball at Taunton, taking two wickets including the valuable scalp of Lewis. 

West Indies are confident Andre Russell will be fit to face Bangladesh at Taunton on Monday in what could prove a pivotal World Cup match.

The all-rounder was forced off the field in Friday's match against England because of a knee problem, and could only bowl two overs.

A fit Russell is a major asset to West Indies and captain Jason Holder said the Jamaican was "progressing quite nicely", with a final decision on his availability to be left until the morning of the match.

Holder allayed concerns over Evin Lewis, who took a blow to the body in the nets, saying the opener had only "a little bruise" and should be fit to play. Lewis has scored just three runs in two innings so the Windies will be relying on him to improve on that, if selected.

Bangladesh have won seven of their last nine ODIs against the Windies, including the last four matches, and Holder said his team would look to counter that recent history.

"If you want to put us in the underdog category, fair enough," Holder said on Sunday. "We've played them quite a bit in the recent past and they've gotten the better of us in recent past. [This is a] different stage, lots at stake for this game. We're all up for it."

Bangladesh are hopeful Mushfiqur Rahim will be able to take part after X-ray and MRI scans gave him the all-clear following a nets scare.

The wicketkeeper-batsman was hit on the hand by a delivery from team-mate Mustafizur Rahman but was "totally fine" on Sunday, according to captain Mashrafe Mortaza.

Bangladesh and West Indies have both won once, lost twice and had a match rained off at the World Cup, leaving five matches to play.

Both are seeking to rediscover early momentum, knowing further defeats at this stage will put their semi-final hopes in serious doubt.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

Bangladesh have shown flashes of their potential, beginning with victory over South Africa before losing a tight match to New Zealand. Their bowlers could not cope with England's brutal batting in Cardiff, however, and that is sure to have alerted the likes of Chris Gayle.

West Indies also started strongly by rolling over Pakistan at Trent Bridge. They fell just short against Australia at the same ground but were crushed by eight wickets against England at Southampton, an outcome that shattered some of the optimistic illusions around their pace attack.

WHAT THEY SAID

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza: "We still have five matches left. So you never know. You don't have to think [about] all those five matches. Tomorrow's match is very important. We have to take one by one. It's been ups and downs. But still a lot of matches left. We can make the difference. And we have to believe in it, which I believe that my team is believing."

West Indies captain Jason Holder: "I don't want to sit here and try to perceive what they would come with, but we're open to anything. Traditionally they rely heavily on their spinners. We don't expect them to move too far away from it. It's a smallish ground. I saw the wicket today as well. There's quite a bit of grass on it. We'll see how it plays. But we know what we're expecting in a sense from Bangladesh. And I can't see them being much different from that."


OPTA FACTS

- Bangladesh have lost their last two completed World Cup matches and have not lost three in a row in the same World Cup since the 2007 tournament. The last defeat in that run came against West Indies.

- West Indies all-rounder Andre Russell has an ODI batting strike rate of 130.6, the best of any batsman from any country to score 500 or more runs in the format.

- West Indies batsman Shimron Hetmyer needs 34 runs to reach 1,000 in ODIs. He averages 40.3 with the bat so far in his career.

- Bangladesh paceman Mustafizur Rahman is set to play his 50th ODI. He already has 87 wickets to his name at an average of 23.4 - the best average of anyone to take more than five wickets for Bangladesh.

- Shakib Al Hasan requires 23 more runs to become the second player to score 6,000 men’s ODI runs for Bangladesh, joining Tamim Iqbal who stands on 6,695.

Bangladesh fast bowling coach Courtney Walsh expects his team to come back strongly as they take on West Indies in their fifth game of the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2019 in Taunton on Monday. 

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