Southampton boss Ralph Hasenhuttl has strongly criticised Arsene Wenger's proposed change to how offside works in the VAR era.

Former Arsenal manager Wenger, appointed chief of global football development at FIFA in November, said a tweak should be made after this season's implementation of VAR in the Premier League led to many goals being ruled out for marginal offsides.

"There is room to change the rule and not say that a part of a player's nose is offside, so you are offside because you can score with that," Wenger said at the recent Laureus Sports Awards. 

"Instead, you will not be offside if any part of the body that can score a goal is in line with the last defender, even if other parts of the attacker's body are in front. That will sort it out and you will no longer have decisions about millimetres and a fraction of the attacker being in front of the defensive line."

According to Hasenhuttl, Wenger's idea would not solve any problems at all.

"The only rule that really works in VAR is the offside," said Hasenhuttl.

"And we want to change this? I don't know why. It's the only black-and-white decision which is always right or wrong. The rest is subjective.

"If we change it the way he wants to do it, we can stop playing offside because it won't work anymore.

"It will change the game massively in my opinion. The only thing that really works well at the moment is the decision about offside. And everything else we must discuss more."

The body that governs football's global laws, the International Football Association Board, has ruled out an imminent change to the offside law, with its annual general meeting due to be held in Belfast on February 29.

The body that governs football's global laws has ruled out any imminent alteration to the offside rule after Arsene Wenger proposed change following a host of VAR controversies.

Former Arsenal boss Wenger, who is now FIFA's chief of global football development, suggested a player should not automatically be ruled offside if a part of their body that can be used to score a goal has moved beyond the relevant defender.

Wenger said: "There is room to change the rule and not say that a part of a player's nose is offside, so you are offside because you can score with that. Instead, you will be not be offside if any part of the body that can score a goal is in line with the last defender, even if other parts of the attacker's body are in front.

"That will sort it out and you will no longer have decisions about millimetres and a fraction of the attacker being in front of the defensive line."

Wenger has always had a prominent voice in the game, but he now holds office within world football's governing body, which adds weight to such propositions.

The Frenchman, who was speaking at the Laureus Awards, said it was "time to do this quickly", which has been interpreted as hoping the change could come before Euro 2020.

Yet the International Football Association Board (IFAB) has indicated a rule change is unlikely to be rushed through.

An IFAB annual general meeting in Belfast on February 29 will be the first point at which Wenger's idea can be discussed. with the ongoing use of VAR and its 'possible future developments' on the agenda.

However, that summit in Northern Ireland will not see the offside rule overhauled.

IFAB general secretary Lukas Brud told Sky Sports News: "There will be no law change regarding offside at this month's annual general meeting.

"We welcome Mr Wenger's views and look forward to discussing it, as a group.

"But our AGM is a point of discussion on offside and any law change will follow only after further dialogue in the game over the coming months."

The video assistant referee system has resulted in frustration for players, fans and coaches alike this season, with a host of goals disallowed for marginal offside decisions.

Olivier Giroud saw a header ruled out in Chelsea's 2-0 defeat to Manchester United on Monday after a check showed part of his foot was offside.

There have also been instances in the Premier League where goals have been disallowed due to attackers being measured offside from their armpits.

The current rule states: "A player is in an offside position if: any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent."

Arsene Wenger is proposing a change to the rules to reduce the number of marginal offside calls going against attacking players.

Wenger, appointed Chief of Global Football Development at FIFA in November, wants the law to change so that a player would be onside if any part of their body with which they can score a goal is level or behind the relevant defender.

The former Arsenal manager, who would apparently be keen to see the amendment brought in before Euro 2020 begins in June, believes changes are needed to stop goals being disallowed after players are penalised for fractional infringements by VAR.

"The most difficult [problem] that people have [with VAR] is the offside rule," Wenger said at the Laureus Sports Awards. "You have had offsides by a fraction of a centimetre, literally by a nose. It is the time to do this [change] quickly.

"There is room to change the rule and not say that a part of a player's nose is offside, so you are offside because you can score with that. Instead, you will be not be offside if any part of the body that can score a goal is in line with the last defender, even if other parts of the attacker's body are in front.

"That will sort it out and you will no longer have decisions about millimetres and a fraction of the attacker being in front of the defensive line."

The offside rule is expected to be discussed by football's lawmaking body IFAB, which meets in Belfast on February 29.

Wenger's suggestion comes after more recent fan frustration over goals that have been disallowed for marginal offsides following VAR checks.

Olivier Giroud saw a header ruled out in Chelsea's 2-0 defeat to Manchester United on Monday after a check showed part of his foot was offside.

There have also been instances in the Premier League where goals have been disallowed due to attackers being measured offside from their armpits.

Roberto Firmino had such a goal ruled out in Liverpool's win over Aston Villa in November, while Norwich City striker Teemu Pukki was similarly punished against Tottenham in a match that finished 2-2.

Ruud Gullit has criticised the Porto team-mates who urged striker Moussa Marega not to walk off after he was racially abused at Vitoria Guimaraes.

Marega, a former Vitoria player, scored Porto's winning goal on the hour at Estadio Dom Afonso Henriques on Sunday before attempting to leave the pitch after receiving abuse from the stands.

The 28-year-old Mali international was prevented from doing so by colleagues and Vitoria players before eventually being substituted by Porto coach Sergio Conceicao, who described the incident as "unfortunate".

Marega had been booked for his goal celebration when he pointed to his skin. Objects were thrown in the direction of Marega, who displayed his middle fingers to supporters as he departed down the tunnel.

Former Netherlands and Milan superstar Gullit told Omnisport: "Normally if a player gets kicked in my team you want to protect him. I didn't see this protection from his own team. I didn't see it from the opposition. I didn't see it from the coaches.

"That's something that needs to happen. You have to take a stand with each other.

"It's affecting the industry of football totally. Then you come to the authorities – they have cameras and everything in the stands. They can pick out who did it, get him a life ban so they can never get back into the stadium."

Gullit, who experienced racism in his playing career, added in a news conference at the Laureus Awards in Berlin: "It shouldn't be just the responsibility of the player himself but for everybody there who was involved in that game and that is the little bit I am most disappointed in."

Former Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger, now chief of global football development at FIFA, said such episodes of racism were unacceptable.

"Of course you are against it because it's violence, basically," Wenger said. "We have enough modern tools to identify people who do it and to punish them severely and ban them from going to the games. That is the first step that has to be made."

That thought was echoed by former Real Madrid, Milan and England boss Fabio Capello, who said: "You have to find the people that shout because some fans go to the stadium for this.

"They like to do this, and we need to find these fans and ban them from stadiums for life, not for two or three games."

Arsene Wenger backed the ban UEFA handed down to Manchester City for breaching Financial Fair Play (FFP) regulations but acknowledged some "evolution" is needed in the rules.

UEFA announced on Friday that City had been handed a two-season suspension from European competition and a €30million fine for breaching their FFP framework.

The club have since confirmed they will appeal the decision at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Former Arsenal boss Wenger is in favour of capping finances but believes further work is needed to ensure there can be no questioning the legality of certain actions.

However, he was in no doubt that clubs deemed to have contravened the regulations deserve punishment.

"I was always for control of the financial rules. Let the clubs work with the natural income they have," said Wenger, who now works for FIFA as its chief of global football development.

"I'm convinced that there is an evolution to be made in the way the rules are at the moment. But they are what they are and you have to respect them.

"People who don't respect them and are caught trying to get around the rules in more or less legal ways have to be punished. If it's proven that this has been done on purpose then this cannot go unpunished.

"Sport is about winning by respecting the rules. If there's no respect for the rules, it's not real sport, which is what I think is most important."

The ban imposed by UEFA has led to speculation over the future of some of City's star players, as well as coach Pep Guardiola.

However, Guardiola has reportedly told the players he will remain at the club regardless of the outcome of the appeal to CAS.

Mikel Arteta feels like he is "back home" after being appointed Arsenal's new head coach and declared himself ready for the challenge ahead.

The former Gunners captain was named Unai Emery's permanent successor on a three-and-a-half-year deal on Friday, seeing him return to the club he represented for five years as a player.

Arteta has worked as assistant to Pep Guardiola at Manchester City since July 2016 and is ready to make the move into management, starting with the top job at Arsenal.

"I feel back home. I'm extremely happy and proud to have been given the opportunity to be manager of this football club," he told a news conference on Friday.

"I've been preparing for a few years for this challenge to come. I know what this club deserves. I'm ready for the challenge. I can't wait to start working with the players.

"If I didn't feel ready and prepared I wouldn't be sitting in this chair. I completely understand the fans' concerns. I will give every drop of blood for this football club to make it better.”

Arteta watched his new side up close last weekend as City ran out comfortable 3-0 winners at Emirates Stadium, a defeat that leaves Arsenal 10th in the Premier League.

The Gunners have won just one of their past 12 matches in all competitions and Arteta - who will take charge for the first time against Bournemouth on Boxing Day - acknowledged a massive improvement is needed.

"The first priority is to change the energy," he said. "Last week I was here with Manchester City and I felt a little bit down.

"I want to get everybody in the club with the same mindset. We have to build a culture that sustains the rest.

"My job is to convince everybody that this is how we're going to live. If you're going to be part of this organisation it’s going to be this way.

"We need the fans. We need to engage them, to transmit our behaviour and intention. That's the only way they'll give us a little bit and we'll feel that connection.

"When you're outside this football club you look at it and think wow, this is massive."

Asked if he feared Arsenal have lost their identity since the exit of long-serving boss Arsene Wenger 19 months ago, Arteta replied: "That's what I'm sensing from the outside.

"I'd like to understand the reasons why and to implement certain things that are quick wins for the players, staff and everybody else."

And Arteta, who won two FA Cups during his playing days at Arsenal, admitted he has Wenger to thank for setting him on the path that led to his appointment in north London.

"When I was playing in England, I started to realise what Arsenal meant," he said. "I was born in Barcelona and the club that had most similar style, values and vision was Arsenal. 

"So I was telling the people around me that I had a dream and it was to play for this club. And it was one man, his name is Arsene Wenger, that believed in me and gave me the opportunity to play for this club.

"After that he made me captain and I wouldn't be sitting here if he didn't have the vision to give me the opportunity to enjoy this incredible club."

Arsene Wenger's legacy in world football is very apparent, with the number of his former players who are becoming managers rising all the time.

The latest addition to an ever-growing list is Mikel Arteta, who has been appointed as Arsenal's successor to Unai Emery.

Arteta spent five years playing under Wenger at Emirates Stadium, winning a couple of FA Cups during that time.

The Spaniard has a tough task on his hands as he prepares to take over an Arsenal side lying 10th and seven points adrift of the top four in the Premier League.

As Arteta prepares to begin his new venture, we take a look at how other Wenger proteges managed when they swapped the pitch for the dugout.

 

TONY ADAMS

A four-time champion in England's top flight and Arsenal's captain fantastic in Wenger's early years in charge, Adams has not quite matched those lofty standards as a coach.

He had a year at Wycombe Wanderers and a little over three months at Portsmouth, with both spells pretty miserable. When Granada came calling in April 2017 in a desperate bid to avoid relegation from LaLiga, Adams took charge for seven matches and lost all of them.

SOL CAMPBELL

Campbell was another centre-back extraordinaire under Wenger after his acrimonious move from Tottenham, and was only converted to the world of management in November 2018.

The 45-year-old chose a real challenge for his first appointment, taking over Macclesfield Town, who were languishing bottom of League Two before Campbell steered them to a great escape.

He left the financially stricken club in August of this year and has now taken on another ambitious project in the form of League One strugglers Southend United, who have just seven points from 21 matches this term.

REMI GARDE

He only spent three years playing under Wenger before retiring in 1999, winning the Premier League the year before, but it was not until 2011 that Garde took up his first head coach role with Lyon.

Under Garde, Lyon won the Coupe de France in 2012 and the Trophee des Champions in the same year, before he took over at Aston Villa in November 2015. He only lasted until the following March. He was most recently in charge of Montreal Impact before being sacked in August.

OLEG LUZHNY

Luzhny won a Premier League title under Wenger before stints with Wolves and Latvian side Venta, where he became player-coach for a spell in 2005.

After hanging up his boots for good, the former Ukraine international became assistant at Dynamo Kiev and was twice interim head coach before landing the top job at Tavriya Simferopol in 2012. He is now back in Kiev as an assistant again.

PAUL MERSON

Although his finest years as a Gunner preceded Wenger's arrival, Merson did play under the Frenchman for a year before he had spells with Middlesbrough, Aston Villa and Portsmouth.

After joining as a player in 2003, Merson became Walsall manager a year later, but constant line-up changes and supporter unrest led to him being sacked after a 5-0 thrashing by Brentford in February 2006. He is now a television pundit and columnist in the UK.

DAVID PLATT

Platt was approaching the end of a storied career when Wenger took over and the midfielder left after the manager's first two years in charge. He was briefly Sampdoria boss but resigned after six matches, with other Serie A clubs angry that he was appointed without coaching qualifications.

A player-manager spell with Nottingham Forest followed, before three years in charge of England Under-21s. After three years on Manchester City's staff, he spent a year in India with Pune City, and is now part of a consortium that has bought Palermo.

GIOVANNI VAN BRONCKHORST

Van Bronckhorst won the Premier League and FA Cup under Wenger before leaving for four successful years with Barcelona in 2003 - a spell that included a Champions League final triumph over the Gunners. He then returned to boyhood club Feyenoord, finishing his career in 2010.

After a year in charge of Netherlands' Under-21 team, he went back to Feyenoord and worked as assistant coach for four years before taking the top job in 2015. Five domestic trophies – including an Eredivisie title – followed before he departed after the 2018-19 campaign, and he has been tipped for big things. 

PATRICK VIEIRA

An inspirational skipper under Wenger and the leader during a time when Arsenal were at the forefront of English football battling Manchester United. 

Vieira went on to have spells with Juventus, Inter and Manchester City before turning his hand to coaching with New York City, where he spent two years before returning to France to coach Nice. He led the club to seventh last term but they find themselves in 14th after 18 matches so far this campaign.

THIERRY HENRY

Arguably the greatest player to have featured under Wenger for the Gunners, Henry is a Premier League great who became Arsenal's all-time record goalscorer before treading a familiar path to Barcelona.

He later returned to north London for a short loan spell from New York Red Bulls and was appointed assistant coach to Roberto Martinez with Belgium in 2016.

Henry's first stint as a head coach was a disappointing one, winning just four of 20 matches in charge of Monaco – the club where he started his playing career. The France legend will hope for more success in his new venture with Montreal Impact.

Liverpool forward Mohamed Salah is displaying a similar level of quality to Lionel Messi, according to former Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger.

Salah has won the Premier League's Golden Boot award for the past two seasons - although he shared it with club team-mate Sadio Mane and Arsenal striker Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang in 2018-19 - and the 27-year-old already has 13 goals to his name in all competitions this season.

The former Roma forward has also provided seven assists, a tally which includes teeing up Naby Keita's opening goal in Liverpool's 2-1 win over Monterrey in the Club World Cup semi-finals on Wednesday.

With the Egyptian stepping into a playmaker role as well as being an unerringly accurate finisher, Wenger believes Salah is now showing flashes of play on the same level as Barcelona superstar and 2019 Ballon d'Or winner Messi.

"I like his evolution," Wenger told beIN Sports. "Because he had touches [against Monterrey] of a playmaker.

"He created chances around the box that are exceptional, there were shades of Messi in him and I like that a guy who can score so many goals also becomes the guy who gives assists.

"That is a complete player. That's what we all admire and what we want from our players."

Wenger was speaking in a joint interview with Liverpool coach Jurgen Klopp, who echoed the Frenchman's sentiment.

"Very good, very good experiences [with Salah] but the most positive was on the training ground – sensationally good," Klopp said. "On the pitch he's great, really, really good."

Liverpool take on Copa Libertadores champions Flamengo in the Club World Cup final on Saturday.

Arsene Wenger believes Mikel Arteta's "great future" must be nurtured with a strong backroom team if Arsenal make the inexperienced Spaniard their new head coach.

The Gunners have held talks with their former captain and are expected to appoint him to replace Unai Emery.

Arteta, 37, spent five seasons at Emirates Stadium as a player before retiring and taking up a coaching position with Manchester City in 2016.

He is well-regarded after working as Pep Guardiola's understudy but ex-Arsenal boss Wenger said the club would have to take measures to counteract his lack of experience.

"I am an Arsenal supporter and at the moment I support the manager in charge. The manager in charge is [Freddie] Ljungberg," Wenger told reporters in Doha.

"When Arteta will be in charge I will support Arteta.

"Of course Arsenal is going through a difficult period. It's better that I don't comment on that. I just suffer like every supporter."

He added: "I believe that Mikel has a great future. He has certainly learned a lot in his first position as an assistant coach and after that he will have to deal with the fact that he has no experience at that level.

"He will have to get surrounded well and get a good environment at the club."

Achieving the latter, according to Wenger, is an essential ingredient if Arsenal are to restore their status as a Premier League powerhouse.

The north Londoners have missed the top four in three successive seasons and have not finished higher than third since 2004-05.

"Most importantly, every club – and Arsenal especially – is built on special values and inside the club people have to take care of that," the Frenchman said.

"That is most important. What makes the culture of the club great is, first, the values of the club, and you have to be faithful to that. He will have to be surrounded, if he comes in, to respect that."

Arsene Wenger believes VAR can work in the Premier League, and the former Arsenal manager thinks referees should be encouraged to use pitchside monitors to reach decisions.

VAR has caused plenty of contention since the English top division elected to introduce it for the 2019-20 season.

Several marginal decisions have been heavily scrutinised, with clubs calling for clarity on how the system is to be implemented, while the time it has taken to make decisions has also been called into question.

Wenger – now head of global football development for FIFA – has backed VAR to work but believes the Premier League has changes to make, given referees have been told to look at video footage sparingly.

"I honestly believe it is working much better than people think because I have witnessed many bad decisions before," Wenger said in Belfast following a meeting of the International Football Association Board (IFAB).

"Let's not forget it is in its first year, so of course everything is not perfect. The adjustments will come. You have to educate people in the VAR to get them to intervene at the right moment."

According to BBC Sport, Wenger said: "Let's not forget that it is video assistance for the referee, so they [VAR] are not the ones who should make the decision but the ones who help the referee to make the right decision.

"For me, that is the most important worry, the referees on the field are there because they have the experience and they are confident."

IFAB has accepted VAR decisions must be more effectively communicated with broadcasters and supporters, with possible options to be discussed ahead of the governing body's annual general meeting in February.

Meanwhile, potential improvements to concussion protocols were also discussed, with Wenger confirming IFAB is intent on making the game safer for players.

"It's a very serious issue," said Wenger. "We are all conscious the health and safety of the players is the priority. We will try to do what is requested to protect the players."

Jose Mourinho believes it is impossible for managers to match the 20-year dynasties that Alex Ferguson and Arsene Wenger achieved, with Premier League bosses now forced to "fight for our job every day".

Former Chelsea and Manchester United manager Mourinho was appointed Tottenham head coach last week after Mauricio Pochettino was sacked just six months on from guiding Spurs to the Champions League final.

Another high-profile departure followed on Friday as Unai Emery, Wenger's replacement, lost his job at Arsenal after 18 months at the helm.

Manchester United have similarly struggled to fill the void left by Ferguson, who reigned for fully 27 years at Old Trafford, with Mourinho acknowledging job security rarely lasts longer than a day now at top clubs.

"Twenty years in a club? I don't think it's possible," he told reporters.

"Modern life, new technologies, social media - I think everything has an influence, even people's mentality, faster relations, getting tired easily, so many things that are changing.

"Not [just] football but [these things] are changing the world and the perception of things that I think Wenger was the last 'man/one'. It's a bad thing for us.

"We have to adapt and we have to try to prove that we are the man for the job. We have to fight for our job every day.

"I think the times where people know the job is going to be mine for X amount of years [are gone]. You have to fight for your job every day. Not just with the football results but with everything you do in the club.

"I think it's normal. It happens in society in so many areas. I can imagine even yourself in your newspaper and your radio you have to not just sleep on what you did previously.

"I think you have to show every day you have that you are the guy for the job. I think it's just life."

But Mourinho said he does not go into new jobs worrying about how long his tenure will last.

"I don't think about that," he said. "I think about trying to show I am the man for the job every day."

Jose Mourinho has proven a successful, and controversial figure, during his long managerial career.

Trophies have been plentiful, as have confrontations with rival managers.

There have been clashes in Italy, Spain and England as the former Porto, Chelsea, Inter, Real Madrid and Manchester United has made waves throughout Europe.

Here, we look back at five of Mourinho's most heated moments.


"Demenza senile"

Premier League managers having a go at each other is nothing new, but it felt like Antonio Conte and Mourinho crossed a line in the 2017-18 season. Mourinho appeared to implicate Conte when he suggested counterparts act like "clowns" on the touchline, with the Italian often running into the crowd to celebrate Chelsea goals.

From there, the row quickly escalated. Conte hit back, suggesting Mourinho was suffering from "demenza senile", which translates as senile dementia. Mourinho famously ran down the touchline at Old Trafford when Porto scored a key Champions League winner, but Conte had gone too far and Chelsea quickly clarified that he meant "amnesia".

Having successfully provoked Conte, Mourinho blamed the media for the whole affair and referenced match-fixing allegations made against Siena during Conte's time in charge. The former Italy boss served a ban but was later cleared of any wrongdoing. 

Conte then called Mourinho a "little man" and suggested he would seek to meet his rival "in a room" to sort out their difficulties.

Poking Tito Vilanova in the eye

It was assumed that Pep Guardiola and Mourinho would renew their old rivalry when the pair were appointed by Manchester City and United respectively in 2016, but the row never boiled over.

The closest they have come to fireworks was a clash in the Old Trafford tunnel following City's 2-1 win in the Manchester derby in December 2017. Mourinho allegedly went to the away dressing room to complain over the volume of City's celebrations, only for a melee to ensue. Guardiola was not present at the time and Mourinho later blamed a "diversity in education" between the two Manchester squads for the fracas.

Mourinho and Guardiola go way back, with the Portuguese believing he should have been appointed by Barcelona before they moved for their former player. Later, while in charge of Real Madrid, Mourinho saw his side thrashed 5-0 at Camp Nou, while he was sent off for gouging the eye of Guardiola's assistant, Tito Vilanova, during the 2011 Supercopa de Espana. Mourinho also suggested Guardiola's Barcelona won the 2010-11 Champions League by virtue of generous refereeing.

Wenger a 'specialist in failure'

That Mourinho seemingly lost interest in rowing with former Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger was probably a sign of how far the Gunners eventually fell under the veteran Frenchman. Mourinho no longer saw Wenger as a rival. It was not always the case, though, as Wenger was the subject of one of the 56-year-old's most famous rants, when he called the Arsenal manager a "specialist in failure".

Mourinho's Chelsea were a point clear of the Gunners atop the Premier League table in February 2014 when the Portuguese hit out at a long trophy-less wait for the Gunners. "If I do that in Chelsea, eight years, I leave and don't come back," Mourinho said.

Back in 2005, Wenger was called a "voyeur" by Mourinho. "He likes to watch other people," he said. "There are some guys who, when they are at home, have a big telescope to see what happens in other families. He speaks, speaks, speaks about Chelsea."

"I don't want to win the Europa League"

Mourinho has often had a problem with managers who succeeded him at clubs, with Rafael Benitez drawing his ire on multiple occasions. 

After Mourinho left Inter, Benitez took over and claimed the Club World Cup with the Serie A side. "I thought he was going to thank me for the title I gave him," said the ex-Porto boss.

Benitez took charge of Chelsea briefly between Mourinho's two spells at Stamford Bridge, leading the Blues to Europa League glory. "I don't want to win the Europa League," Mourinho said. "It would be a big disappointment for me."

Mourinho had obviously changed his tune by 2017, when winning the Europa League earned Manchester United a route into the Champions League.

Parking the bus

At United, Mourinho's team were often accused of 'parking the bus', which is ironic as he is credited with introducing the phrase to English football.

After a 0-0 draw against Tottenham in 2004 during his first Chelsea spell, Mourinho said: "As we say in Portugal, they brought the bus and they left the bus in front of the goal."

And after Inter knocked out Barca on the way to the Champions League title in 2010, Mourinho extended the metaphor further.

"We won the tie in Barcelona, but everyone talks about Barcelona winning and says we parked the bus in front of the goal," said Mourinho. "We didn't park the bus, we parked the plane."

Arsene Wenger has been confirmed as FIFA's chief of global football development.

Wenger, 70, spent 22 years in charge of Arsenal until 2018 and had been linked with the vacant managerial position at Bayern Munich in recent weeks, but instead he will take up a new position with the global governing body. 

During his time with the Gunners, Wenger was widely considered one of the world's greatest managers and among the most influential in Premier League history.

The Frenchman built a strong reputation for his forward-thinking style of play and for developing young players, and in his new position Wenger will be tasked with "driving growth" for men and women across the globe.

Former Arsenal captain Patrick Vieira insists Unai Emery deserves to be given time to turn around the Gunners' recent fortunes.

Pressure is mounting on Emery following last Saturday's 2-0 Premier League defeat away to high-flying Leicester City.

Arsenal are already eight points adrift of the top four after 12 matches and have won only once in their past seven games in all competitions.

While it is believed the club hierarchy remain behind Emery, who was appointed as Arsene Wenger's successor after the 2017-18 season, there is a growing discontent among Arsenal supporters who think a change is essential to save their season.

Vieira, a three-time Premier League champion in a glittering Arsenal career, says now is the time to unite behind the under-fire former Paris Saint-Germain boss.

"It's true Arsenal are going through a tough spell," he told reporters on Monday. "But I haven't watched all their matches, so I can't talk about their game.

"They have a coach who is qualified who works well. When a club is having a difficult time, it's important to be united. I think he has enough experience to get them through this difficult spell.

"We have to get behind him and give him time to change things. I am not sure a change of manager will fix the problems."

Wenger, meanwhile, has lately been tipped to make a first return to management since leaving Emirates Stadium.

The 70-year-old told beIN SPORTS last week that he would be holding talks with Bayern Munich chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge over the prospect of succeeding Niko Kovac, but he then clarified on Monday that he was not in the running for the job.

Nice head coach Vieira still hopes to see his old manager make a return to the dugout, saying: "I would like to see him coaching again.

"Arsene has a big passion [for football]. I have never met another coach who spends more time watching football games, analysing their opponent's matches, talking about football.

"It's his passion, it's his life. So, I hope he can find another club to coach. It didn't work out with Bayern Munich; maybe it will work out with another team."

Arsene Wenger revealed he will not take over as Bayern Munich head coach despite confirming he was approached by the Bundesliga giants.

Bayern sacked Niko Kovac after a 5-1 loss to Eintracht Frankfurt earlier this month and former Arsenal manager Wenger was linked with a move to the Allianz Arena.

However, the 70-year-old – who has been out of management since leaving Arsenal in May last year – ruled himself out of taking over at Bundesliga champions Bayern.

"I'm out of this. First of all, I never was candidate. I have been approached and I'm not in the running for the job," Wenger told beIN SPORTS.

"I'm not a candidate for the job."

Asked if that meant he was done with management, Wenger said: "No, not necessarily."

Hansi Flick has led Bayern to wins over Olympiacos in the Champions League and Borussia Dortmund in the Klassiker as interim coach.

Bayern are third in the Bundesliga, four points behind leaders Borussia Monchengladbach, after their 4-0 rout of rivals Dortmund.

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