Super Bowl winners the Kansas City Chiefs take on a team with significant championship pedigree in the New England Patriots on Sunday. 

Patrick Mahomes led the Chiefs to an impressive victory over reigning MVP Lamar Jackson's Baltimore Ravens last time out, extending their winning streak to a franchise record 12 games across the regular season and playoffs. 

In Week 4 they face Bill Belichick's Patriots, giving Mahomes a chance to pit his wits against another MVP-winning quarterback in Cam Newton. 

Using Stats Perform data, we break down that matchup and some of the other enticing games coming up.

FEATURE GAME

Patriots at Chiefs – Sunday, 4.25pm (all times Eastern)

- In three career games versus New England, including postseason, Mahomes has only one first-half touchdown pass against three interceptions. In the second half of those three games, Mahomes has seven TD passes, no interceptions and a 64.7 completion percentage.

- After Newton piled up 122 rushing yards and 552 passing yards in Weeks 1 and 2, New England running backs took over against the Las Vegas Raiders last week, piling up 287 scrimmage yards – the most for Patriots tailbacks in a game in seven years. The Patriots lead the NFL with 178.0 rushing yards per game, the team's highest mark through three games of a season since 1983 (225.7). They have led the NFL (or AFL) in rushing yards only once in their history – in 1978.

- Andy Reid is set to coach his 340th career regular-season game, breaking a tie with Jeff Fisher for eighth all-time. His 210 wins rank sixth all-time, three spots behind Belichick’s 275 victories.

OTHER KEY GAMES

Colts at Bears – Sunday, 1pm

- The Chicago Bears are the first team in NFL history to win two games in a single season where they were trailing by at least 16 points in the fourth quarter (Week 1 at the Detroit Lions, Week 3 at the Atlanta Falcons). This season, teams that trail by at least 16 points at any point in the fourth are 2-18 – the Bears are 2-0 and everyone else is 0-18.

Vikings at Texans – Sunday, 1pm

- Kirk Cousins threw two interceptions in the Minnesota Vikings' loss last week giving him an NFL-high six on the year (tied with Carson Wentz) and matching his total from 2019. Cousins has completed 59.0 percent of his pass attempts this season, a figure that ranks 31st among 33 qualifiers (minimum 14.0 pass attempts per team game).

Ravens at Washington – Sunday, 1pm

- Baltimore have scored at least a point in their last 95 halves of regular-season football. The longest such streak in NFL history is 96 by the New Orleans Saints from 2015 to 2018. The Ravens have scored 54 first-half points this season, third most in the NFL, and Washington has allowed 54 first-half points this season, tied for fourth most in the league.

Bills at Raiders – Sunday, 4.25pm

- Buffalo Bills running backs have not scored a rushing touchdown since Week 9 of last season, a span of 234 carries, by far the longest active streak in the NFL (the Bears are second with 70). Meanwhile, the Raiders have allowed two rushing touchdowns in each of their games this season – only the Carolina Panthers (7) have allowed more rushing scores this season

Eagles at 49ers – Sunday, 8.20pm

- For the first time since 1999, the Philadelphia Eagles have yet to win a contest three games into a season after tying with the Cincinnati Bengals in Week 3. Only two teams (out of 251) that have gone winless through the first four games of the season went on the make the playoffs – the 1992 Chargers and the 1963 Bills.

ELSEWHERE...

Chargers at Buccaneers – Sunday, 1pm

- The gaps in age (20 years, 219 days) and in career starts (284) between Tom Brady and Justin Herbert would be the largest of all-time between opposing starting quarterbacks.

Falcons at Packers – Monday, 8.15pm

- After blowing a 15-point lead in the fourth quarter against the Dallas Cowboys, the Falcons squandered a 16-point lead in the final period in their Week 3 loss to the Bears. Since 1925, teams with at least a 14-point lead in the fourth quarter have won 98.2 percent of the time, and Atlanta are the only team two lose two such games consecutively.

Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid is working on the team's NFL Super Bowl title defence from his basement amid the coronavirus pandemic.

COVID-19 is wreaking havoc globally, with sport brought to a standstill – the Olympic Games has been postponed until 2021, while the NBA is among the leagues on hiatus.

NFL teams are preparing for this month's draft, ahead of the start of the season in September, and Reid is still working hard, albeit from a different location.

Reid, who led the Chiefs to glory in Super Bowl LIV, told reporters on Thursday: "I wish I could take you on a virtual tour of this thing.

"It's kind of classic. I'm sitting in my basement, literally. I've got an arc trainer sitting here in case I want to jump on that to get a little exercise.

"I've got my monitor set up, along with my computer, my iPad right next to that. And I've got one of my wife's antique tables here, a little coffee table that I'm using to throw everything on. But I'm in the basement, yeah. You know what? It's not bad.''

"We stay as current as we can through information from the league. We're approaching it like we're having a season," Reid added. "I think it's twofold, because it can be a real positive energy-giver back to the country at a time of maybe need for that.

"At the same time, we're very sensitive to everything going on. But as far as the offseason goes – again, we're out of the office until they let us know that we can get ourselves back in and so I've got different plans that I've kind of set up for different stages of [the offseason], whether it's virtual work or whether they let us back in the building for field work. Whatever it is, I've put together plans for that. And then we'll just take it day by day and see what presents itself.''

The Chiefs were scheduled to start offseason conditioning on April 20 – three days before the NFL Draft – with practice to follow in May.

"We've got a little time before that,'' Reid said. "We'll just see what direction it goes. That's normally a time we use for conditioning workouts. If we're allowed to do that virtually, we can go ahead and do that at that time. We'll try to stay in touch.

"If we're allowed to visit with the players with our Webex units or whatever, we can do that. We're prepared to do all of that. And then if they're allowed back in the building, we're good with that. We've got that all planned out, too.''

Andy Reid vowed "next year, we're coming right back here" as the Kansas City Chiefs celebrated their Super Bowl LIV triumph with a mammoth parade on Wednesday.

The Chiefs ended a 50-year wait for a title thanks to a thrilling 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers, having trailed by 10 points during the fourth quarter of the game in Miami.

It marked the crowning glory in the career of popular head coach Reid, who finally won a Super Bowl ring for the first time, and he clearly has little intention of it being his only success.

Speaking in front of fans, Reid declared: "Next year we're coming right back here. One more time, baby. One more time."

The trophy for the AFC champion is named after Lamar Hunt, the father of franchise owner Clark Hunt.

Lamar Hunt died in 2006 and superstar quarterback Patrick Mahomes, who gleefully chugged beers on the bus during the journey, said that was part of the inspiration for the Chiefs.

"When I became the starter, the first thing I wanted to do was bring the Lamar Hunt Trophy back to Kansas City, back to this organisation," said Mahomes, who was named MVP for the game.

"And the second most important thing I wanted to do was bring the Vince Lombardi Trophy to the best coach in the National Football League."

Among the celebrations and shenanigans, Travis Kelce adorned a Louis Vuitton coat reportedly worth $20,000, as well as a custom-made WWE title belt strapped around his waist.

Stepping up to the microphone, Kelce bellowed out, "Can you dig it?" and screamed, "You've got to fight for your right to party" in reference to team's anthem by The Beastie Boys.

Hollywood actor and Chiefs fan Paul Rudd also got in on in the act, sharing what the result meant to him while speaking to the NFL Network.

"You get the feeling that no one else in the league is paying attention. It's a small market. Only Chiefs fans know about it," Rudd said. 

"It's the first time I've been able to say to my son, 'You can be proud of this team, you don't have to wait until next year'. It's pure elation.

"Every single year since he was seven, he cries at the end of the season. This year, he cried more than ever, but they were happy tears."

Patrick Mahomes will allow others to worry about his contract negotiations amid reports the Super Bowl LIV MVP could earn a record-breaking $200million extension.

The Kansas City Chiefs quarterback led his franchise to their first Lombardi Trophy in 50 years in Miami on Sunday, guiding Andy Reid's team to a 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers thanks to two late touchdown passes at Hard Rock Stadium.

In becoming the youngest man to ever win the league MVP and Super Bowl MVP awards in his career, Mahomes is viewed as the future of the NFL, a point his team will be making when they get down to talking money with the Chiefs.

Mahomes will enter the final year of his $16.42m rookie deal next season and though Kansas City have the right to exercise the fifth-year option, they could thrash out a long-term contract this offseason.

"That's stuff that's handled with other people," Mahomes said on Monday, where he addressed the press before making the customary MVP visit to Disney World.

"Obviously, I want to be in Kansas City for a long time. I understand that and also I want to win a lot of football games here.

"For me, it's kind of letting that stuff handle itself. I'm in a great organisation.

"I have a great team of guys working for me, guys and girls.

"For me, it's about trusting those people and finding the best way to do it in order to have the best team around me."

The biggest overall contract in the NFL was the five-year, $150m deal Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan signed last May.

Aged 61, Kansas City's Reid may be 37 years older than Mahomes, but he is not thinking of calling it a day after finally winning his first ring as a head coach.

"I still enjoy doing what I'm doing," said Reid, who revealed he did not sleep with the Lombardi Trophy on Sunday evening and instead spent it listening to Pitbull.

"I got this young quarterback over here that makes life easy every day. Every day it's a pleasure to come to work and know that you have an opportunity to coach him and his team-mates.

"[General manager] Brett Veach understands what it takes to win but also the kind of people that we enjoy working with, so he brings those kind of guys in and makes it enjoyable."

Andy Reid was craving a "double cheeseburger with extra cheese" after ending his long wait for a Super Bowl title as a head coach on Sunday.

His Kansas City Chiefs team beat the San Francisco 49ers 31-20 in Miami's Hard Rock Stadium to capture the franchise's second Super Bowl, and their first in 50 years.

No head coach had won as many games as Reid without winning a Super Bowl title, yet his 222nd victory across the regular season and playoffs finally delivered a ring.

Asked how he planned to celebrate, Reid said: "Well, I joked about it but I'm going to have a double cheeseburger tonight, with extra cheese!

"I'm going to enjoy it with my family and the team, that's what I'm going to do. That's exciting."

The 61-year-old almost certainly secured his place in the Pro Football Hall of Fame with the victory.

Yet Reid, who lost a Super Bowl when head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles, said he was uninterested in what impact the win would have on his legacy.

"You know, I don't care about that, man, I really don't," he insisted.

"This is a pure team sport, I love that part of it, that's why I got in it - I didn't get in it for any other reason than to win games and to win them with great people.

"And so we bust our tail to do that as players and coaches, that's the part that I think needs respect.

"You take care of that and everything else happens and the other stuff? That's not really where my mind goes. It really is the last thing on my mind."

One thing that will be on Reid and his Chiefs players' minds soon will be whether to accept the customary White House invitation for the Super Bowl champions.

In previous years some players and even entire teams have swerved the visit due to their opinion of current White House tenant, US President Donald Trump.

Reid, though, intends to attend if invited.

"I haven't even thought about that. [but] I'll be there," he said.

"They're inviting us, I'll be there. It's quite an honour, I think."

Patrick Mahomes believes his Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid should be considered one of the greatest tacticians in NFL history after their team's Super Bowl victory.

The Chiefs' 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers in Miami was Reid's 222th across the regular season and playoffs, and it ended his long wait for a Lombardi Trophy as a head coach.

Mahomes, named the game's MVP, was instrumental, rushing for a first-quarter touchdown and then throwing two late scores as the Chiefs overturned a 10-point deficit midway through the fourth quarter.

"I had two goals when I became the starting quarterback for the Kansas City Chiefs," Mahomes explained in his MVP news conference.

"The first goal was to win the Lamar Hunt Trophy [AFC Championship]. I wanted to bring it home, the one that has our founder's name on it. I wanted to bring it to this family and this organisation.

"And the second most important thing was to get coach Reid a Super Bowl trophy. He's one of the greatest coaches of all time.

"I don't think he needed the Lombardi Trophy to prove that. But just to do that, it puts all doubt aside, and he's going to be listed as one of the all-time great coaches in history whenever he wants to be done, which I hope is not any time soon."

Mahomes, who finished with 286 passing yards, two touchdowns and a pair of picks, became the youngest player to ever win the NFL MVP award – which he did last season – and claim a Super Bowl ring.

Given their quarterback is only 24, the Chiefs could dominate the NFL for the foreseeable future in the same way the New England Patriots and Tom Brady have in winning six titles over the past two decades.

"It's pretty amazing, the dynasty or whatever you want to call it the Patriots have had these last 15 or 20 years," Mahomes admitted.

"So for me it's about taking it one year at a time. We came up short last year. We understood how hard of a challenge it was to get to this position again and we found a way to do it.

"We understand next year that when we come back it's going to be the same amount of tenacity and dedication every single day if we want to be here.

"I think we just take it one year at a time, one day at a time and try to put together great years, and then at the end of it all we will have no regrets on where we are at."

Kansas City Chiefs owner Clark Hunt said "nobody deserves this trophy more than Andy Reid" after the veteran head coach claimed his first Super Bowl title.

After 222 wins and 21 years as a head coach, Reid ended his drought for a Lombardi Trophy following Sunday's come-from-behind 31-20 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

Reid was the winningest coach in the NFL without a Super Bowl ring until the Chiefs overturned a 10-point deficit inside the final seven minutes against the 49ers.

Celebrating Kansas City's first Super Bowl success in 50 years, Hunt hailed Reid – who joined the Chiefs in 2013 after 14 years with the Philadelphia Eagles, where he lost to the New England Patriots in the 2005 showpiece.

"It's a beautiful trophy and I can't think of a better conclusion to the 100th season of the NFL than receiving this trophy," Hunt said during the trophy presentation.

"I'm so happy for our players, coaches and our fans. And especially Andy Reid. Nobody deserves this trophy more than Andy Reid.

"I want to thank the lord for blessing our family with all these incredible people, who helped bring these championship home.

"To the Chiefs kingdom, you guys are world champions once again."

Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid is longer the winningest NFL head coach without a Super Bowl title.

Reid's long wait for a championship ring ended thanks to Sunday's 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers in Miami.

It was Reid's 222nd win in the NFL, and it proved to be the biggest.

Reid, who spent his first 14 seasons as a head coach with the Philadelphia Eagles up until 2012, has spent the past seven campaigns in Kansas City.

A career spanning 21 years, Reid's teams had made 15 playoff appearances, winning 10 division titles and reaching seven conference championships.

The Reid-led Eagles reached the Super Bowl in 2005 but fell 24-21 to the New England Patriots in Jacksonville, Florida.

But the popular 61-year-old finally had something to celebrate at the second attempt – Reid's Chiefs overturning a 10-point deficit inside the final seven minutes.

The Eagles even congratulated Reid, tweeting: "Time's yours, Andy".

Kansas City Chiefs star Patrick Mahomes said the team never lost faith after denying the San Francisco 49ers in the Super Bowl.

The Chiefs overturned a 10-point deficit inside the final seven minutes as Kansas City claimed their first title in 50 years with a 31-20 victory in Miami on Sunday.

Mahomes led the way for the Chiefs, crowned Super Bowl MVP thanks to his two touchdowns against the 49ers at Hard Rock Stadium.

The youngest player to be named NFL MVP and win a Super Bowl in their career at 24 years and 138 days, Mahomes – the 2018 MVP – told Fox Sports afterwards: "We never lost faith. That's the biggest thing.

"No one had their head down. We believed in each other, that's what we preached all year long. We had this guy right here [referencing Reid] to get us here.

"We had to jump in. Defense had some big stops for us and we found a way to win in the end.

"Keep firing, keep believing in your eyes and throwing it. It gives me the confidence to do what I do."

It was also a monumental moment for Andy Reid, who finally celebrated his first Super Bowl triumph as a head coach.

Reid earned a championship ring, having first been appointed coach of the Philadelphia Eagles in 1999.

Asked if it was worth the wait, the 61-year-old said: "Absolutely, absolutely. Love this guy right here [Mahomes] and the other guys. This is what it's all about. What a great team and coaches. Appreciated every bit of it."

Reid continued: "I'm good. My heart is racing. I'm getting older. I can't let it race too much."

Andy Reid is one of the NFL's most successful head coaches, but there is one thing that has so far eluded him in that job.

His place in Canton's Pro Football Hall of Fame will surely be assured if he can claim a first Super Bowl ring by leading the Kansas City Chiefs past the San Francisco 49ers in Miami on Sunday.

Until he gets that monkey off his back, Reid has the most victories among NFL head coaches who have not won a title in that role.

Here we take a look at who else features high on that list.

 

ANDY REID - 207 regular-season wins, 14 playoff wins

There is a Super Bowl ring in Reid's collection, but it came when he was the Green Bay Packers quarterbacks coach and assistant to Mike Holmgren at Super Bowl XXXI.

Since being elevated to the top job with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1999, Reid has had 16 winning seasons, including seven in a row in Kansas City.

Yet his only previous appearance in the Big Dance was at Super Bowl XXXIX, when the Eagles were beaten by a New England Patriots team wrapping up a dynasty.

MARTY SCHOTTENHEIMER - 200 regular-season wins, five playoff wins

A head coach with the Cleveland Browns, Chiefs, Washington Redskins and San Diego Chargers, Schottenheimer had no problems getting teams into the postseason.

Yet he had a 5-13 record in the playoffs and never made it to a Super Bowl.

His teams went one-and-done nine times in the postseason, including San Diego's 2006 Divisional Round home loss to the Pats - after Schottenheimer's Chargers had gone 14-2 in the regular season.

DAN REEVES - 190 regular-season wins, 11 playoff wins

Had the distinction of taking two teams to the Super Bowl like Reid, but both the Denver Broncos and Atlanta Falcons came up short under Reeves' guidance.

His career as an NFL head coach spanned 23 seasons and three teams - the Broncos, New York Giants and Falcons.

Reeves took the Broncos to three Super Bowls in four years and guided a 14-2 Falcons team all way to Super Bowl XXXIII, yet on each occasion, he was on the losing side.

JEFF FISHER - 173 regular-season wins, five playoff wins

Fisher's teams had sub-.500 seasons in each of his last six seasons as an NFL head coach, but a decade of success with the Tennessee Titans ensured he amassed the wins.

The Titans first reached the playoffs in the 1999-00 season, winning three times before losing to the St. Louis Rams in Super Bowl XXXIV, when Kevin Dyson fell one yard short of scoring and potentially forcing overtime.

Like Reid, he does have a Super Bowl ring, with Fisher on injured reserve when the 1985 Chicago Bears and their much-vaunted defense won the Lombardi Trophy.

BUD GRANT - 158 regular-season wins, 10 playoff wins

A Pro Football and Canadian Football Hall of Famer, the only thing missing from Grant's resume was a Super Bowl ring.

He got close - replicating Reeves and Marv Levy in getting to the showpiece event four times but never getting over the hump as his Minnesota Vikings team lost to the Chiefs, Miami Dolphins, Pittsburgh Steelers and Oakland Raiders in the 1970s.

However, Grant did win four Grey Cups in Canada, guiding the Winnipeg Blue Bombers to the showpiece game in five times in six years.

MARV LEVY - 143 regular-season wins, 11 playoff wins

Levy's Buffalo Bills endured a stretch of Super Bowl heartbreak that has never been matched. From 1990 to 1993 Buffalo were the class of the AFC, only to come up short in the Super Bowl in four consecutive seasons.

Scott Norwood's infamous missed field goal with four seconds left - a play now simply known as "wide right" - denied them victory in Super Bowl XXV against the Giants, but the subsequent year's game with the Redskins and a pair of clashes with the Dallas Cowboys ended in blowouts.

Levy did win two Grey Cups with the Montreal Alouettes, but the Pro Football Hall of Famer was never able to add a Super Bowl ring to an otherwise magnificent resume.

Patrick Mahomes was considered the "greatest player" Kansas City Chiefs general manager Brett Veach had ever seen when he entered the NFL, Andy Reid said.

The Chiefs are reaping the rewards of trading up to land Mahomes with the 10th overall pick in the 2017 NFL Draft, going one better and reaching Super Bowl LIV in Miami after falling in the AFC Championship Game last year.

That was Mahomes' MVP campaign and his body of work across his two seasons as the starter - during which time he has thrown 9,128 passing yards and 76 touchdowns - suggest he might be the best quarterback in the game right now.

Few believed Mahomes could make such an impact prior to the 2017 Draft, yet Chiefs head coach Reid revealed Veach was convinced he was not just great, but the best ever.

"You knew he was going to be great," said Reid, whose team face the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl LIV this Sunday.  

"Brett Veach said it; he's our general manager. He said he's the greatest player he'd ever seen.

"That's quite a tribute to the kid. Now that I've been around him, and you've watched him play, he's pretty doggone good."

Such was Veach's confidence in Mahomes, the Chiefs packaged two first-rounders and a third to acquire the former Texas Tech signal caller.

His sensational arm strength, ability to throw from different angles, on the run and even without looking have ensured he has astounded in the professional ranks.

According to Tyreek Hill, that talent is coupled with a leader's mentality that reminds him of a wrestling great.

"There's this thing that he does on the sidelines. Almost like The Rock, when he smoulders," Hill added.

"Then he'll just like be serious, he'll be like 'Come on, guys, let's go, man' and get us turned up and get us fired up.

"Having him is definitely a blessing. He's a tremendous leader on and off the field. He leads by example, he's always working hard, trying to be the best.

"Pat is very different, man. Like you see most guys, you'll be like 'Man, he's very talented but he don't got the work ethic.' Well, Pat got both."

Andy Reid hinted the Carolina Panthers and New York Giants are interested in his Kansas City Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy.

The Panthers and Giants are without head coaches after sacking Ron Rivera and Pat Shurmur respectively.

Highly rated offensive coordinator Bieniemy has been touted as a candidate for both teams, and Reid – whose Chiefs side on Sunday clinched a first-round bye for the playoffs – suggested the reports are true.

"I can tell you that you're probably heading in the right direction," Reid told a media conference on Monday when asked if the Panthers and Giants had been in touch over Bieniemy's availability. 

"As we sit here today, it's that time of the year, but you know how I feel about Eric. I think he'd be tremendous.

"There's a team out there, I don't know the team, but there's a team out there that could use him, being the leader of men that he is.

"You're not going to find people better than that and he's got a sharp offensive mind on top of that. I'm a big fan, I don't want to lose him, but realistically, that's what it is."

Reid confirmed safety Juan Thornhill will miss the postseason after sustaining an anterior cruciate ligament injury in the Chiefs' 31-21 win over the Los Angeles Chargers on Sunday.

Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes does not have a broken hand and should be available to face the Denver Broncos, according to head coach Andy Reid.

Mahomes hurt his throwing hand in Sunday's 23-16 win over defending NFL Super Bowl champions the New England Patriots.

Chiefs star Mahomes landed awkwardly but played the entire game, with X-rays clearing the reigning MVP of any major damage.

"Patrick's hand is OK," Reid told reporters on Monday. "It's bruised up pretty good. But there's no break in it."

Mahomes was 26 of 40 for 283 yards and a touchdown as the Chiefs clinched the AFC West title against Tom Brady's Patriots.

Ahead of Sunday's clash with the Broncos, Reid added: "He [Mahomes] was having a little tougher time gripping the ball, so we went with a little bit more of a shallow cross game [and] shorter throws. We ran the ball a little more, probably."

The Chiefs (9-4) are still second behind the Patriots (10-3), one game adrift in the race for the AFC's top seed, as they prepare to welcome Denver to Arrowhead Stadium.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.