If the San Francisco 49ers have a big lead in Super Bowl LIV on Sunday, their coaching staff are unlikely to let minds drift to thoughts of confetti, parades and rings.

They may have been forgiven for doing so three years ago when the Atlanta Falcons led the New England Patriots 28-3 late in the third quarter of Super Bowl LI.

Lady Gaga, the half-time act that year, had long finished singing. But it turned out the fat lady had not.

Back came the Patriots, Kyle Shanahan's offense unable to add further points to their total, and Tom Brady perhaps cementing his legacy as the G.O.A.T by inspiring a 34-28 overtime win that stunned the Falcons.

Shanahan has since left Atlanta, taking the Niners' head-coaching post shortly after, but he admitted this week that Super Bowl scars remain.

The same is true for the staff he brought with him. Those aiming to banish the demons of Houston. Of '28-3'.

"I'm not gonna lie; you still think about it quite a bit," the Niners' passing-game coordinator Mike LaFleur told Omnisport.

Shanahan said the only play he would have called differently in that second half was a second-and-11 pass play that resulted in Matt Ryan being sacked and pushed out of field-goal range.

Yet the Patriots' comeback was a brutal reminder of how even sizeable advantages can be eroded in the NFL.

At Super Bowl LIV, the Niners face a Kansas City Chiefs team that have already overturned 24 and 10-point leads this postseason.

Those who know Shanahan best believe a return to the Super Bowl will not suddenly trigger post-traumatic stress because '28-3' has always been with him ever since it happened.

San Francisco's run-game coordinator Mike McDaniel, who, like LaFleur, worked with Shanahan in Atlanta and at the Cleveland Browns, told Omnisport: "It's just the final game of the season, the stakes are incredibly high but I wouldn’t say that it would venture into Kyle's head any more than any other lesson.

"You'll never forget. Once you lose a Super Bowl like that, you just never feel comfortable with a lead, but that's been every single game since that we've been burying that weight.

"That's a lesson that you'll always be mindful of and you'll lose leads in the future but you'll do your best and better understand and think through how to handle situations - like all coaches that are able to have sustained success like Kyle."

LaFleur is adamant that Shanahan remained an aggressive playcaller in Houston, but he also recognises that, should the Niners find themselves in a similarly dominant position against the Chiefs, no one will be getting complacent.

Not with Patrick Mahomes on the other sideline. Not with '28-3' in their minds.

"I just know up in the box on Sundays, I don't care what the score is," LaFleur added.

"We had numerous times this year where we had big leads and you don't feel comfortable.

"I'm not saying the clock has to hit zero but the knees better be out or a lot of running the ball and the other team not using their timeouts."

Mitch Wishnowsky was out fishing when he got the phone call that changed his life.

He was a 20-year-old glazier in Western Australia, slowly getting back to normal after suffering from dengue fever in Bali.

The voice on the other end of the line had little sympathy, though.

"Mitch, are you done messing about in Bali?" John Smith asked.

"Stop wasting your life."

It was the first time Wishnowsky had spoken to Smith, the head coach of Prokick Australia, an organisation set up to help those Down Under have a career in American football.

"[He was] yelling at me, basically," Wishnowsky told Omnisport.

"Told me he'd change my life, [to] quit my job tomorrow, move to Melbourne. I was sold."

His parents, at least initially, were not, but on Sunday Wishnowsky will be punting for the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl LIV.

It will be the realisation of a life-long dream... Sort of.

He had grown up playing soccer and Australian rules football, though shoulder injuries meant he had to give up the latter.

Wishnowsky had been urged to try American football - the flag variety - by some friends and it was when he was "messing around" punting that he caught the attention of someone who knew Smith and his colleague Nathan Chapman - both of whom spent time in the NFL.

"I always dreamed of being a pro athlete," Wishnowsky added.

"I was 20 and I had to give [Australian rules] away. I was devastated. I'm 20, I'm not going to be a pro athlete, time to move on.

"Randomly, this came out of the blue, this was my last chance."

From Melbourne, Wishnowsky went to a junior college in Santa Barbara and onto college in Utah, and in 2016 he won the Ray Guy Award, given to college football's best punter.

The NFL beckoned and the 49ers selected Wishnowsky in last year's draft, the rookie establishing himself as the team's starting punter in their run to the Super Bowl, where they face the Kansas City Chiefs in Miami.

He may be one of the few from his country in the NFL, but those who do hail from Australia tend to be punters.

Michael Dickson, Lachlan Edwards, Jordan Berry and Cameron Johnston all hold starting jobs in that position, and Wishnowsky puts the influx of Australian punters down to their grounding in Aussie rules.

"We just grow up from whatever age – five, four – punting a football," Wishnowsky added.

"If you ask us to throw it, we're useless because we didn't do it."

Jarryd Hayne and Valentine Holmes were not required to throw the ball, just run it, but neither was able to replicate the type of success they had as NRL players.

Rugby league star Hayne impressed enough to make the 49ers' roster in 2015 but lasted only half a season, while fellow Australia international Holmes returned to the NRL in November after a year on the New York Jets' practice squad.

"Even when Jarryd Hayne came over, I thought there are incredible athletes in Australia, [but] he's going to struggle, so just to do what he did was incredible," Wishnowsky said.

"Some of the athletes that are over here are incredible, so fast, so quick, cut up.

"They will eat pancakes and maple syrup every meal and they will just be cut. They are just different. I think it is a tough thing to get into."

Wishnowsky has had no such problems making the transition, though, and on Sunday he will achieve something beyond even his wildest dreams.

"I didn't even consider this," Wishnowsky admitted.

"My dream was to play in the NFL, it's almost a new dream to play in the Super Bowl."

There was renewed speculation about Tom Brady's future with the New England Patriots on Thursday of Super Bowl LIV week after he posted a cryptic photo on social media.

For the first time in four years, Brady is not involved in a Super Bowl after defending champions New England were knocked out by the Tennessee Titans on Wild Card Weekend.

Yet that has not stopped their 42-year-old quarterback being the subject of plenty of focus in Miami given he is due to be a free agent this offseason.

That chatter intensified on Thursday evening when Brady posted an uncaptioned black and white image of himself walking in the tunnel at the Patriots' stadium.

Perhaps thinking this could be the precursor to a departure announcement, New York Jets Pro Bowler Jamal Adams wrote on Twitter: "Please leave the AFC East!"

The possibility of 20-year veteran Brady playing anywhere other than New England for the first time in his career appears a more realistic possibility than it ever has in the past.

The six-time Super Bowl winner has hinted he would like to continue playing and not retire yet.

This week his former Pats team-mate Rob Gronkowski suggested Brady test the waters in free agency to see what he could command on the open market.

"I truly believe that he deserves the opportunity to go explore, to see what's out there, he's been playing for so long," Gronkowski said.

"The way that he's been playing, the level that he's been playing at, he deserves an opportunity to go out there and test the market.

"Why wouldn't you? You've never done it before in your career and he's going to be a free agent for the first time ever. Good for him. Go test out the market and do what's best for himself.

"That's the decision he has to make – what's best for himself, what's best for his family, what he feels like he's going to love.

"That's all up to Tom, he's a grown man and he can make that decision on his own."

Greg Olsen has left the Carolina Panthers, the tight end and the team have announced.

The two confirmed on Thursday they had mutually agreed to part ways, bringing to an end Olsen's nine-season Panthers career.

Olsen starred in Carolina's run to Super Bowl 50, where they lost to the Denver Broncos.

The veteran, who the Chicago Bears traded to the Panthers in 2011, had been under contract through the 2020 campaign.

"Today, I had the opportunity to sit down with [general manager] Marty Hurney and have a great conversation regarding my future with the organisation," Olsen said in a lengthy statement posted to his official Twitter page.

"The team and I are both on the same page that it is best we go in different directions for now."

While thanking staff and team-mates in Carolina, Olsen added he had "not closed the door on any potential career options".

He said: "I still have the love of football in my heart and will explore all opportunities presented to me."

Shakira and Jennifer Lopez promised to remember Kobe Bryant at the Super Bowl LIV half-time show in Miami on Sunday.

The Kansas City Chiefs will face the San Francisco 49ers at Hard Rock Stadium exactly a week on from the shock death of Bryant and his daughter, Gianna, who were killed in a helicopter crash in California.

Bryant, a five-time NBA champion and 18-time All-Star with the Los Angeles Lakers, was a role model for many of the NFL players that will take to the field on Sunday.

Shakira, who will perform during the interval at the Super Bowl as a co-headliner with Lopez, revealed her long-time boyfriend, Barcelona defender Gerard Pique, was also deeply affected by the news and said she will be thinking of Bryant when she performs on Sunday.

"Gerard, my partner, called me with the sad news, he was affected because he knew Kobe and I knew him too, he went to one of my shows," Shakira said.

"I can't imagine the pain that his family must be going through right now. Life is so fragile and that's why we have to live every moment as intensely as we can.

"I think we will all be remembering Kobe on Sunday and we will be celebrating life and diversity in this country. I'm sure he would be very proud to see the message that we are going to be trying to convey on stage that day.

"I think it's a very important moment for the Latino community in this country. The Super Bowl is a very American event, it's as American as it can get, and I think it's going to be very nice that it's also going to be a reminder of the heritage of this country, which is one of diversity; that's what we will be celebrating on Sunday."

Lopez posted an emotional tribute to Bryant and his family on Instagram and she was choked up discussing the impact it had had on her and her fiancee, MLB great Alex Rodriguez.

"I was in the middle of rehearsing and talking about this show and Alex came to me with tears in his eyes and he said, 'You're not going to believe what happened'," Lopez explained.

"He was devastated. He knew Kobe very well, they came up together and entered sports around the same time. He was just devastated. I knew Kobe and Vanessa more in passing. He had come to my last show in Vegas, the both of them, as a date night. We had a beautiful night that night.

"I think it's affecting everybody so much because it's just reminding us again how fragile life is, how we have to appreciate every single moment, how we have to love people when they're here and not wait. How we don't get the opportunity – it can be taken away from us so easily. 

"Then I think about Vanessa as a mum and losing her best friend and partner, and losing her child. I think how awful that must for her be right now. I just wanted to send her a message and just been praying that God guides her through every moment because she has three more babies to take care of.

"Just wishing that the nightmare was over but it's not going to be and that's life, we have to carry on but at the same time it affects us and will affect us forever. Hopefully we will remember this moment and what we're trying to do is spread love, kindness and bring everybody together.

"In this week, this happening has a sound around the world that we have to love each other, and we have to be together and support each other. We can't be so at odds all the time and that's part of our mission and message too."

Richard Sherman accused the NFL and team owners of putting a "price tag" on player safety in pushing for a 17-game regular season.

Plans to expand the fixture schedule have proved an obstacle in ongoing negotiations over a new collective bargaining agreement (CBA).

The existing deal expires at the end of next season and NFL commissioner Roger Goodell has insisted player welfare continues to be a priority amid "incredibly productive dialogue" with the NFL Players Association (NFLPA).

Sherman, an NFLPA vice-president, remains unconvinced, believing talks will drag on unless the league backs down.

"I don't think it's something the players are interested in, honestly," the San Francisco 49ers cornerback said ahead of Sunday's Super Bowl against the Kansas City Chiefs.

"If that's the point they're negotiating on, I think these negotiations are going to go a lot longer than anticipated.

"It's odd to me, and it's always odd, when you hear player safety is their biggest concern. And they're really standing up for player safety, player safety, player safety, but it seems like player safety has a price tag.

"Player safety up to the point of hey, 17 games makes us this much money so we really don't care how safe they are, if you're going to pay us this much money to play another game.

"That's the part that's really concerning for us as a union and us as players. They think that players have a price tag on their health and I don't think we're in the same ball park in that regard. Players have been more aware of player safety and longevity and life after football."

Sherman believes the NFL intends to use the extended season as a bridge to an even longer 18-game schedule, forcing players to "risk their bodies".

"That's what's so ridiculous about it, and nobody calls them out, nobody calls out the hypocrisy," he continued.

"I'm hoping that one day people will be brave enough to call out the hypocrisy of saying hey, we really care about player safety, but hey we always want you to play an extra game and put your body on the line and risk your career."

Roger Goodell conceded the NFL's Rooney Rule has to change due to the lack of minority head coaches.

Only four of the 32 NFL teams have minority head coaches, with just two of 13 openings filled by such candidates over the past two years.

San Francisco 49ers defensive coordinator Robert Saleh and Kansas City Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy, whose teams face off in Super Bowl LIV on Sunday, were thought to be leading contenders for the five jobs available after this season but both were overlooked.

That has led to Goodell admitting the Rooney Rule, which was established in 2003 and requires teams to interview minority candidates for head coach and other senior positions, must be looked at.

"Clearly, we are not where we want to be on this level," Goodell said at his annual pre-Super Bowl address on Wednesday.

"We have a lot of work that's gone into not only the Rooney Rule but our policies overall.

"It's clear we need to change and do something different. There's no reason to expect that we're going to have a different outcome next year without those kinds of changes, and we've already begun engaging in those changes.

"Not just with our diversity committee, not just with the Fritz Pollard Alliance, but others, and trying to figure out what steps we can take next that would lead to better outcomes.

"It's clear we are all committed to doing that and we have to make those changes.

"So, we will have a series of meetings, which we've already scheduled, over the next month to get that kind of dialogue going, to continue the dialogue and to try to determine what are the solutions, so we can have those better outcomes."

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell vowed to help Antonio Brown "get back on track" following the wide receiver's latest controversy.

Seven-time Pro Bowler Brown has not played a down in the NFL since September, when he was cut by the New England Patriots after just 11 days amid allegations of sexual assault and rape.

The NFL launched an investigation into those accusations and suggested Brown, who had a try-out with the New Orleans Saints in December, would be placed on the commissioner's exempt list - barring him from playing until the probe was concluded - should he sign for another team.

Last week an arrest warrant was issued for the 31-year-old on charges of burglary with battery and criminal mischief, with a judge freeing Brown from house arrest on Tuesday.

Goodell was asked for an update on the NFL's investigation into Brown on Wednesday at his annual pre-Super Bowl address, and he was keen to stress the player's mental state is of paramount importance.

"I think [with] Antonio's situation, I think the first thing, for all of us, is to talk about the well-being of Antonio, to understand what Antonio is going through," Goodell said.

"We don't talk about the wellness of our players publicly but I would tell you that you can be sure that the NFL and NFLPA have a tremendous amount of resources that are available to all players. They are going to be made available to Antonio.

"We want to help get him on the right track and get him in a position where he is in a zone where he thinks he can be successful in life.

"We are confident that can happen. We want to work to do that. From our standpoint, that's the first step - making sure we're doing everything to help Antonio."

Nick Bosa's outstanding rookie campaign with the San Francisco 49ers has DeForest Buckner believing there is no limit to what he can achieve in the NFL.

Defensive end Bosa was considered the best prospect in the 2019 NFL Draft and, after the Arizona Cardinals selected quarterback Kyler Murray first up, the San Francisco 49ers took him off the board with the second pick.

The son of former first-round pick John Bosa and brother of two-time Pro Bowler Joey Bosa, the youngest Bosa has already lived up to the family name with nine sacks and an interception across his debut campaign earning him a Pro Bowl nod too.

Bosa will almost certainly be named the NFL's Defensive Rookie of the Year on Saturday, 24 hours before he plays in Super Bowl LIV against the Kansas City Chiefs in Miami, and fellow defensive lineman Buckner feels his team-mate will only get better.

"I don't think there is a ceiling yet," he said. "I can't wait to see next year what he can do.

"He's been one hell of a talent and one hell of a hard worker.

"It's just been unbelievable to see that as a rookie, his technique, most of all, throughout the season has just got better.

"His win rate pass rushing-wise on a consistent basis has been unreal. I've never seen a rookie so polished coming out."

Prior to this season, Bosa, who, like his brother, went to Ohio State, had not played since September due to a groin injury sustained while playing for the Buckeyes.

That prevented him from impressing Buckner straight away, though the reason why the Niners drafted him so early on soon became clear.

"He was a little rusty obviously in OTAs, training camp, especially because he hasn't played football in a while," Buckner explained.

"But as we were getting closer and closer to the season starting you could see him really getting back into it.

"It was kind of like riding a bike again. Just to see him throughout the season skyrocket in his play has been unbelievable to see."

Patrick Mahomes believes he landed in the ideal environment to succeed in the NFL when the Kansas City Chiefs drafted him in 2017.

The 24-year-old was not seen as a sure-fire lock to prosper in the pros when he came out of Texas Tech in a draft class that included fellow quarterbacks Mitchell Trubisky and Deshaun Watson.

The Chicago Bears traded up to the second pick to land Trubisky, a decision Mahomes reminded them of when he celebrated by counting to 10 - the spot where Kansas City moved up to select him - during the Chiefs' Week 16 win at Soldier Field.

While Trubisky has struggled, Mahomes has thrived, something he attributes to the situation at Kansas City, where he sat behind Alex Smith for a year before becoming the full-time starter last season.

"I think I ended up in the perfect place," said reigning MVP Mahomes, who has led the Chiefs to Super Bowl LIV.

"To have coach [Andy] Reid and these coaches around me, to have Alex Smith in front of me for a year and be able to learn from him, and then obviously to have all the players I have around me.

"I'm in a place where the team was already a winning team, a team that had a lot of success and I came in, was able to be who I am, and ended up being able to win a lot of football games early in my career."

Mahomes' success in 2018 meant the Chiefs were considered one of the leading contenders to reach the Super Bowl, unlike the San Francisco 49ers, their opponents in Miami on Sunday.

However, an appearance at the showpiece for the first time in 50 years looked unlikely when Mahomes went down with a worrying-looking knee injury during a game against the Denver Broncos in October.

He was diagnosed with a dislocated kneecap and avoided ligament damage, only missing two games despite initial fears that it could be a serious problem.

"I for sure had those thoughts a little bit whenever I had the injury," Mahomes admitted.

"The biggest thing was I looked down and I knew my knee didn't look right and I thought the worst.

"But, at the same time, when I got back to the locker room and talked to the doctors, they were very positive.

"The next few weeks, with the training staff, they worked me hard to go out there and rehab and do everything the right way and it helped me to come back fast."

Rob Gronkowski has advised his former New England Patriots team-mate Tom Brady to test the waters in free agency this year.

Brady is due to be a free agent at the end of this NFL season and, despite turning 43 in August, the six-time Super Bowl champion has suggested he wants to carry on playing.

Having played with the Patriots for his entire 20 seasons in the NFL, there is a distinct possibility that Brady is wearing a different jersey next year.

He would likely earn more money by signing for another franchise - with the Indianapolis Colts and Los Angeles Chargers among those who could be interested - and Gronkowski thinks Brady should see what is out there.

"I truly believe that he deserves the opportunity to go explore, to see what's out there, he's been playing for so long," FOX Sports' pundit Gronkowski told reporters ahead of Super Bowl LIV between the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers. 

"The way that he's been playing, the level that he's been playing at, he deserves an opportunity to go out there and test the market.

"Why wouldn't you? You've never done it before in your career and he's going to be a free agent for the first time ever. Good for him. Go test out the market and do what's best for himself.

"That's the decision he has to make is what's best for himself, what's best for his family, what he feels like he's going to love.

"That's all up to Tom, he's a grown man and he can make that decision on his own."

Tight end Gronkowski spent his entire nine years in the NFL with the Patriots and won three Super Bowl rings as one of Brady's most reliable weapons.

Tyreek Hill has given competing at the Olympics serious thought and may enlist the help of his fellow Kansas City Chiefs wide receivers for relay trials after Super Bowl LIV.

Speedster Hill, nicknamed 'Cheetah', ran a sub 10-second time for the 100 metres when he was in high school and he remains one of the fastest players in the NFL.

The Chiefs themselves are renowned for their speed on offense, with rookie Mecole Hardman having clocked 4.33 seconds for the 40-yard dash at the combine last year.

San Francisco 49ers defensive coordinator Robert Saleh described the Chiefs offense as like an "Olympic relay team" ahead of Sunday's Super Bowl and Hill, 25, revealed he has contemplated returning to compete on the track having starred as a 200m runner in college.

"Hopefully after the season, if I'm healthy and my mind is still in the right place, I really want to try and like try to qualify for some Olympic teams, even go to Penn Relays, give that a try," Hill said.

"Maybe get a few guys off the team and see if we can put a relay together, and show these track guys that football guys, we used to do this back in high school, man, we still got it, you know?

"I just want to have fun with it, like keep the guys together."

The necessity to bulk up for the rigours of the NFL means Hill would need to change his build, though.

"I have [given it serious thought]," Hill added of the Olympics.

"The thing is I'm weighing 195 (pounds) right now. Back in high school when I ran a 9.9, I was 175.

"If I do it, it'll be like me changing my whole diet, changing everything that I've been doing to get to this point where I am now."

Kyle Shanahan's previous Super Bowl experience left him with "scars" and he vowed not to ease up if the San Francisco 49ers find themselves in a similar position this Sunday.

Three years ago Shanahan was the offensive coordinator for the Atlanta Falcons when they led 28-3 against the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LI.

However, in one of the most astonishing sporting comebacks of all time, Tom Brady guided the Patriots to a fifth Lombardi Trophy with an overtime win that had some criticising Shanahan's second-half play-calling.

The 40-year-old is now the head coach of the Niners and will hope he can finally win a first ring when San Francisco face the Kansas City Chiefs in Miami on Sunday.

"Everyone asks what I learned from that Super Bowl; I wish I could say there was some easy answer that would have fixed us not blowing that lead," Shanahan said on Tuesday.

"I go back and I'm hard on myself on everything. I know the plays I wish I called differently, especially a second-and-11 pass once we got down there [near the end zone] that led to a sack. That was about it.

"You realise when you're playing good teams, good quarterbacks, that you can never relax.

"No matter what situation I've been in since then - you can ask our players, our coaches - I freaked out at [defensive coordinator Robert] Saleh when he tried to take the starters out against Minnesota

"We were up like three scores with two minutes to go and I freaked out. Then I did the math and I thought it was alright.

"You get some of that scars from that stuff so guys were messing with me with that but besides that, it's about that."

Another of Shanahan's regrets was not drafting quarterback Patrick Mahomes, the man Saleh and the defense must likely stop if the Niners are to win Super Bowl LIV.

Shanahan had just been appointed the 49ers head coach prior to the 2017 NFL Draft when Mahomes came out of college and his team owned the second overall pick.

Yet Shanahan thought San Francisco could wait and acquire Kirk Cousins the following the year, so they passed on future Chiefs star Mahomes, later trading for current starter Jimmy Garoppolo.

On Mahomes, the 2018 MVP and arguably the NFL's best quarterback, Shanahan said: "I didn't look into him, obviously, as much as I should have.

He added: "There's always a risk with that when you spend a first-round pick on a quarterback.

"With the situation we were in, we didn't want to be that risky, especially with the second pick in the draft. We didn't [study Mahomes] as hard. Obviously, he ended up being one of the best players in the league, along with a couple of other quarterbacks that year. He's extremely talented."

The Cleveland Browns have hired Andrew Berry as their new executive vice president of football operations and general manager.

Berry, who previously worked with the Browns as a vice president of player personnel, takes over from John Dorsey, who was fired as general manager last month.

He spent the past season as the vice president of football operations for the Philadelphia Eagles and worked under Dorsey towards the end of his first spell with the Browns from 2016 to 2018.

"I'm honoured and blessed to lead the Football Operations of the Cleveland Browns," Berry said. "I'm appreciative of the Haslam family for entrusting me to be a steward of a franchise that is so rich in tradition and history.

"The passion for football courses through the veins of north-east Ohio in a manner that is unique to that of any other region.

"Our fan base's devotion to the Browns is the catalyst for such affection for the sport. Rewarding YOU all - our loyal and faithful Dawg Pound - will energise and motivate me daily to attack the challenge ahead of us.

"It is for that reason that I am excited to partner with Kevin Stefanski - a coach I know our city will embrace because of his leadership skills, work ethic, humility and character - to work tirelessly and with immediate urgency toward building a winning organisation that will make the people of Cleveland proud."

Stefanski replaced Freddie Kitchens as head coach this month. Kitchens was fired after his sole season in charge ended with the Browns going 6-10.

Andy Reid is one of the NFL's most successful head coaches, but there is one thing that has so far eluded him in that job.

His place in Canton's Pro Football Hall of Fame will surely be assured if he can claim a first Super Bowl ring by leading the Kansas City Chiefs past the San Francisco 49ers in Miami on Sunday.

Until he gets that monkey off his back, Reid has the most victories among NFL head coaches who have not won a title in that role.

Here we take a look at who else features high on that list.

 

ANDY REID - 207 regular-season wins, 14 playoff wins

There is a Super Bowl ring in Reid's collection, but it came when he was the Green Bay Packers quarterbacks coach and assistant to Mike Holmgren at Super Bowl XXXI.

Since being elevated to the top job with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1999, Reid has had 16 winning seasons, including seven in a row in Kansas City.

Yet his only previous appearance in the Big Dance was at Super Bowl XXXIX, when the Eagles were beaten by a New England Patriots team wrapping up a dynasty.

MARTY SCHOTTENHEIMER - 200 regular-season wins, five playoff wins

A head coach with the Cleveland Browns, Chiefs, Washington Redskins and San Diego Chargers, Schottenheimer had no problems getting teams into the postseason.

Yet he had a 5-13 record in the playoffs and never made it to a Super Bowl.

His teams went one-and-done nine times in the postseason, including San Diego's 2006 Divisional Round home loss to the Pats - after Schottenheimer's Chargers had gone 14-2 in the regular season.

DAN REEVES - 190 regular-season wins, 11 playoff wins

Had the distinction of taking two teams to the Super Bowl like Reid, but both the Denver Broncos and Atlanta Falcons came up short under Reeves' guidance.

His career as an NFL head coach spanned 23 seasons and three teams - the Broncos, New York Giants and Falcons.

Reeves took the Broncos to three Super Bowls in four years and guided a 14-2 Falcons team all way to Super Bowl XXXIII, yet on each occasion, he was on the losing side.

JEFF FISHER - 173 regular-season wins, five playoff wins

Fisher's teams had sub-.500 seasons in each of his last six seasons as an NFL head coach, but a decade of success with the Tennessee Titans ensured he amassed the wins.

The Titans first reached the playoffs in the 1999-00 season, winning three times before losing to the St. Louis Rams in Super Bowl XXXIV, when Kevin Dyson fell one yard short of scoring and potentially forcing overtime.

Like Reid, he does have a Super Bowl ring, with Fisher on injured reserve when the 1985 Chicago Bears and their much-vaunted defense won the Lombardi Trophy.

BUD GRANT - 158 regular-season wins, 10 playoff wins

A Pro Football and Canadian Football Hall of Famer, the only thing missing from Grant's resume was a Super Bowl ring.

He got close - replicating Reeves and Marv Levy in getting to the showpiece event four times but never getting over the hump as his Minnesota Vikings team lost to the Chiefs, Miami Dolphins, Pittsburgh Steelers and Oakland Raiders in the 1970s.

However, Grant did win four Grey Cups in Canada, guiding the Winnipeg Blue Bombers to the showpiece game in five times in six years.

MARV LEVY - 143 regular-season wins, 11 playoff wins

Levy's Buffalo Bills endured a stretch of Super Bowl heartbreak that has never been matched. From 1990 to 1993 Buffalo were the class of the AFC, only to come up short in the Super Bowl in four consecutive seasons.

Scott Norwood's infamous missed field goal with four seconds left - a play now simply known as "wide right" - denied them victory in Super Bowl XXV against the Giants, but the subsequent year's game with the Redskins and a pair of clashes with the Dallas Cowboys ended in blowouts.

Levy did win two Grey Cups with the Montreal Alouettes, but the Pro Football Hall of Famer was never able to add a Super Bowl ring to an otherwise magnificent resume.

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