The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has reiterated its support for Russia's four-year ban from major international sporting events imposed by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

WADA declared the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) non-compliant again at a meeting in Lausanne, Switzerland, on Monday over inconsistencies in anti-doping data discovered during an investigation.

Athletes will not be able to compete under the Russian flag at the 2020 Olympics or the 2022 Winter Games, while Russia's place at the World Cup in Qatar is also in jeopardy.

The IOC had supported the recommended sanction last month and retained its stance following the announcement.

"The representatives of the Olympic Movement today [Monday] supported this unanimous decision in the WADA Executive Committee, which is in line with the statement made by the IOC Executive Board [on November 26] and endorsed by the Olympic Summit," a statement released to Omnisport read.

The IOC said in November it would "support the toughest sanctions against all those responsible for this manipulation".

It added: "With regard to the sanctions following this manipulation, we will still have to evaluate these in detail.

"The IOC emphasises that any sanctions should follow the rules of natural justice and respect human rights.

"Therefore, the IOC stresses that the guilty should be punished in the toughest way possible because of the seriousness of this infringement and thus welcomes the sanctions for the Russian authorities responsible."

WADA's statement on Monday said: "The WADA Executive Committee has responded in the strongest possible terms, while protecting the rights of Russian athletes that can prove that they were not involved and did not benefit from these fraudulent acts."

Yohan Blake, the second-fastest man in history, could be set to play T20 cricket for the Indian Premier League (IPL) franchise Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB), once he hangs up his spikes.

St Lucia’s track queen Julien Alfred stormed to a big win in the 60m dash at the FastTrack Collegiate Opener in Houston, Texas, on Saturday.

Yohan Blake believes IAAF president Sebastian Coe is "killing" athletics by cutting back on Diamond League disciplines.

Sweeping changes announced in November saw the 200 metres, 3,000m steeplechase, discus and triple jump removed from the schedule for the upcoming season in a bid to accommodate a 90-minute broadcast window.

Former 100m world champion and 200m Olympic silver medallist Blake thinks the decision will do more harm than good to the sport.

"It has changed a lot, I am not going to lie. The times we are running have slowed down, track and field is dying a little," said Blake.

"If [Coe] can take away the 200 and triple jump, I don't know if he is trying to build or trying to kill athletics.

"But that's a stupid move he is making. He must enhance the sport, but he is killing it. It is just madness.

"This is people's careers and where they make money… You cannot do that. Everybody is hating him. We have to take a stand."

Mo Farah has performed a U-turn and elected to defend his 10,000m title at the Tokyo Olympics next year.

Two years ago, Farah walked away from track events to concentrate on marathons and he finished eighth across 26.2 miles in Chicago last month having won the event in 2018.

However, the 36-year-old has decided to return to shorter distances and will aim to add to his Olympic medal collection at the next Games.

Farah, who will still need to qualify for the event in Tokyo, won gold over 5,000m and 10,000m at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics.

"It's been really exciting to compete at the marathon for the last couple of years," Farah said in a message posted on his YouTube Channel.

"To win the Chicago Marathon, as a major marathon, that was nice. To finish third in the London Marathon, was okay, it was good.

"It's been a good learning curve for me - doing the marathon, to run 2:05 - British record, European record. The training for it was totally different to the track.

"Next year I've decided, Tokyo 2020, I'm going to be back on the track. I'm really excited to be competing back on the track and giving it a go in the 10,000 metres.

"Hopefully I haven't lost my speed. I'll train hard for it and see what I can do."

Nine high school student-athletes became first-time scholarship recipients from Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s Pocket Rocket Foundation on Wednesday.

Four-time world champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has made it clear that the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo will be her last but has indicated that she will be attempting to defend her 100m title in Eugene, Oregon in 2021.

Pioneering marathon runner Eliud Kipchoge and U.S. hurdler Dalilah Muhammad were named the world athletes of the year in track and field at a ceremony in Monaco on Saturday.

At the awards ceremony, Jamaican Brittany was presented with a plaque for breaking the World under-20 100-metre hurdles record.

Anderson, who won gold in the event at the 2017 World Under-18 Championships, twice broke the record at the Motonet Grand Prix in Joensuu, Finland on July 24.

The 18-year-old clocked 12.79 in her heat before winning the final in 12.71 seconds.  

Kipchoge was winning the award afer he became the first man to run a sub-two-hour marathon, though the feat wasn’t officially recognized as a world record. That’s because he ran on his own, with a rotating group of pacemakers and in strictly controlled conditions. Kipchoge’s only competitive race this year came when he won the London Marathon in April.

“I am happy to be the first human being to run under two hours. I hope that I inspired a lot of generations,” Kipchoge told the awards ceremony via video link.

Muhammad won world championship 400-metre hurdles in world record time. She earlier broke the record in July at the United States championships.

“It’s been an amazing year. I’m so thankful to be here,” she said.

Muhammad beat fellow nominees Brigid Kosgei, who broke the women’s marathon world record, Sifan Hassan, who won world gold in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres, and Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, who claimed gold over the 100 metres at the World Championships.

The world 5,000-metre silver medalist Selemon Barega of Ethiopia was named male rising star of the year, while Ukrainian high jump silver medalist Yaroslava Mahuchikh was the female rising star. Anderson was also nominated in the category.

The Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) has suspended several leading Russian Athletics Federation (RusAF) officials for their conduct during an investigation into high-jumper Danil Lysenko.

Russian athletes have been prohibited from representing their country since November 2015 following allegations of state-sponsored doping, which have been regularly denied.

Lysenko, a high jump silver medallist from the 2017 World Athletics Championships, was authorised by World Athletics to compete as a neutral athlete following the suspension of RusAF.

In June 2018, Lysenko was notified of a third "whereabouts" failure, with a notice of charge issued against him and a provisional suspension imposed in August 2018.

The AIU investigated the explanations provided by Lysenko, concluding the explanations were false and supported by forged documents.

A subsequent 15-month inquiry into RusAF's conduct has led to senior officials, including the organisation's president Dmitry Shlyakhtin, being charged with serious breaches of anti-doping rules, including a failure to co-operate with an investigation and obstructing an investigation.

In total, seven individuals associated with RusAF – Shlyakhtin, executive director Alexander Parkin, board member Artur Karamyan, senior administrator Elena Orlova, anti-doping coordinator Elena Ikonnikova, Lysenko and his coach Evgeniy Zagorulko – have been charged for anti-doping rule violations of tampering and/or complicity.

All seven have been handed suspensions with immediate effect.

RusAF has until December 12 to respond to the notice, and the AIU board may refer the matter to the World Athletics Council.

Former 100-metre world record holder Asafa Powell says his focus for the upcoming season is to earn a spot on Jamaica’s team to the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, Japan.

Good chemistry was a key reason why Michael O’Hara has decided to return to his high school coach as he looks to kick on from a solid 2019 season when he produced a personal best in the 110m hurdles.

Four-time World 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and her coach Stephen Francis have both been nominated for special awards to be given at the inaugural Panam Sports Gala Awards to be held on December 13 in Fort Lauderdale, USA.

Fraser-Pryce has been nominated in two categories - the Best Female Athlete and the Changemaker - while Francis is a nominee for the Best Coach.

More than 40 athletes and coaches have been nominated in nine categories and part of the selection process will involve voting by the public.

Panam Sports in a release on Tuesday said that "it is launching an easily accessible portal through its website where sport fans, National Olympic Committees, media and even the athletes themselves can vote for who they think made the biggest impact at Lima 2019" and further advised that the public should visit its website at www.panamsports.org/vote to vote quickly as voting closes on November 30.

JOA President, Christopher Samuda, in welcoming the approval of Jamaica's nominees stated that "Shelly-Ann and Stephen are very deserving and all Jamaicans locally and in the Diaspora should go immediately to the polls and vote for the 'S-Powersport Duo' in Shelly and Stephen."

The eventual winners will be announced during the live ceremony and celebration and the show will be broadcast live on the Pan Am Sports Channel.

Secretary-General and CEO of the JOA, Ryan Foster, was emphatic in his support.

"Vote for their past record of admirable achievements. Vote for their current successes. Vote for future landmarks and ink the deal for Jamaica,” he said.

This year, the Jamaica Olympic Association achieved a historic milestone at the Pan Am Games in Lima Peru by sending the largest contingent representing 18 sports and garnered the best ever medal haul for Jamaica in the history of the Games.

"We continue to serve our member associations which have seized our vision and mission which always place the athlete solidly at the centre of our efforts and work," Samuda said.

The Pan American Sports Organization, Pan Am Sports, owns the Pan American Games and leads the Olympic Movement of its 41 member nations throughout the Americas and the Caribbean.

 PanAm Sports has successfully managed 18 editions of the Pan American Games, beginning in 1951, and the event is held every four years.

2008 Olympic sprint hurdles champion Dawn Harper-Nelson says she was once told that because of her skin colour she might not get the recognition her accolades deserved.

Trinidad and Tobago athlete Quincy Wilson is suing the National Association of Athletic Associations over what he claims is the association’s negligence which caused him to become injured thereby losing the ability to earn, to train and prepare for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

The suit was filed in Trinidad and Tobago's High Court of Justice on Monday. Dr Emir Crowne, Matthew Gayle, Crys­tal Paul, and Ja­son Jones are representing the disaffected athlete.

The 28-year-old Wilson is an eight-time national champion and holds the national record of 59.65m. He has also represented Trinidad and Tobago at the CARIFTA Games and in 2011 won a bronze medal at the NACAC U23 Championships in Mexico.

In late July, on or about the 28th, Wilson was competing at the national championships. He stepped into the ring and executed two throws. Two other throws were fouls. However, on his fifth throw, he slipped and fell.

According to court documents obtained by Sportsmax.TV, Wilson suffered shock and severe pain, a meniscal tear in his right knee, pain in both knees. He subsequently experienced psychological damage, mental anguish and a loss of quality of life.

Wilson claims his subsequent inability to train has affected his mood and personality, and he is unable to carry out his household chores and his responsibilities as a husband and father.

He blames the NAAA in that they or their employees painted or covered the discus circle with the wrong substance making it slippery. He also claims that the NAAA failed to ensure that the discus circle was at the requisite standard of safety and that they failed to inspect the circle prior to his accident.

Wilson also claims, among other things, that the NAAA failed to use a certified IAAF official to inspect the circle.

As a result, he wants the NAAA to pay for or facilitate his rehabilitation, cover his lost wages. He is also seeking compensation for the loss of opportunity to compete professionally and possibly attracting sponsors.

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