T&T’s Pan Am medal haul pegged back by positive drug test

By December 27, 2019
T&T Cycling T&T Cycling

Trinidad & Tobago have been stripped of two Pan American Games 2019 medals after Pan Am Sports revealed in a press release that two of the country’s cyclists tested positive for drugs during the Lima, Peru event.

T&T won three medals at the Pan Am games but may now have to return its team cycling gold and an individual cycling medal, with Nicholas Paul’s individual sprint gold the only accolade that remains.

According to reports, T&T have hit back at the Pan Am Games, saying the organisers have breached confidentiality protocol in announcing the decision to rescind the gold medals and had already put the matter before a judiciary panel.

"The information put out by Pan American Sports is currently being challenged by Trinidad and Tobago. Any discussion of reallocation of medals is premature due to the number of things currently being ventilated," said T&T’s team lawyer Tyrone Marcus.

However, Pan Am Sports Secretary-General, Ivar Sisniega insists that no protocols were breached and remained confident that his organisation’s ruling would be allowed to stand.

“We have been very careful with the issue of doping at the Pan American Games of Lima 2019, respecting all the corresponding protocols and processes. After our executive committee meeting, we have officially approved the decisions of the disciplinary commission and the respective disqualifications of the athletes involved, and this has generated the changes we are reporting today. With this, we close the medal table of our Games,” said Sisniega.  

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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