Jamaica's Olympic gymnast takes up coaching at Towson University

By December 11, 2019

Toni-Ann Williams, the first female gymnast to represent Jamaica at the Olympic Games, is now a coach.

The 24-year-old Williams is now the assistant coach of the Towson University women’s gymnastics team.

The team’s head coach Jay Ramirez announced the Williams’ hiring on Wednesday.

"We are beyond thrilled to have Toni-Ann join our Towson coaching staff," said Ramirez. 

"With her highly decorated experience as a recent NCAA gymnast at Cal Berkeley, I think she will play a valuable role in achieving the kind of success that we would like at Towson. Her energy, charisma, and passion for the sport are contagious and we are looking forward to a great season."

Williams told Sportsmax.TV that when she moved back to Maryland after school she wanted to get some experience in college the Maryland community reached out to her telling her that the university needed some help so she contacted the head coach.

"Growing up in Maryland, Towson Gymnastics has always been a big part of the gymnastics community," said Williams. "I'm very excited to be joining the Towson program because of the welcoming community, great coaching staff, and truly wonderful athletes. I'm excited to watch the gymnastics program grow and help these young ladies have the best collegiate experience possible."

So far, she says things have been going well.

“I really enjoy this side of college gymnastics because I understand what they’re going through and I feel like I could give meaningful feedback,” she said.

Williams, a 2019 graduate from the University of California Berkeley, is a seven-time All-American. She is a 2018 NCAA All-American and made the second team All-Around that year. Williams is a six-time regular season All-American (2015-first team vault & floor, second-team All-Around, 2016-first team floor, 2018-first team floor, second-team All-Around).

In 2015, Williams was the Pacific-12 Conference (PAC-12) Freshman of the Year, two-time Regional Gymnast of the year (2015 & 2016) and a 2019 AAI award finalist while competing on the Cal Women's Gymnastics team.

She became Jamaica's first Olympic gymnast, competing in the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro. She qualified for all four events that summer.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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