Devils fire Hynes as head coach

By Sports Desk December 03, 2019

The New Jersey Devils fired head coach John Hynes on Tuesday after a slow start to the NHL season.

Appointed in 2015, Hynes was fired with the Devils holding a 9-13-4 record.

Alain Nasreddine was appointed interim head coach and Peter Horachek an assistant.

"John played an integral role in the development of this team in establishing a foundation for our future and we are grateful for his commitment, passion and unmatched work ethic," Devils executive vice-president/general manager Ray Shero said in a statement.

"John is a respected leader, developer of talent and friend which makes this decision difficult. We are a team that values and takes pride in accountability to the results we produce.

"We are collectively disappointed in our performance on the ice and believe changes were needed, starting with our head coach.

"I have been consistent in my desire to build something here in New Jersey that earns the respect of teams throughout the league and pride in our fans. That is not where we were heading and for me to tolerate anything less was not acceptable."

Hynes finished with a 150-159-45 record at the helm of the Devils, leading them to the playoffs in 2017-18.

He ranks second in the Devils' history for games coached, wins and points.

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