NFL

Super Bowl 2020: 'Nobody deserves this trophy more than Andy Reid' – Chiefs owner Hunt

By Sports Desk February 03, 2020

Kansas City Chiefs owner Clark Hunt said "nobody deserves this trophy more than Andy Reid" after the veteran head coach claimed his first Super Bowl title.

After 222 wins and 21 years as a head coach, Reid ended his drought for a Lombardi Trophy following Sunday's come-from-behind 31-20 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

Reid was the winningest coach in the NFL without a Super Bowl ring until the Chiefs overturned a 10-point deficit inside the final seven minutes against the 49ers.

Celebrating Kansas City's first Super Bowl success in 50 years, Hunt hailed Reid – who joined the Chiefs in 2013 after 14 years with the Philadelphia Eagles, where he lost to the New England Patriots in the 2005 showpiece.

"It's a beautiful trophy and I can't think of a better conclusion to the 100th season of the NFL than receiving this trophy," Hunt said during the trophy presentation.

"I'm so happy for our players, coaches and our fans. And especially Andy Reid. Nobody deserves this trophy more than Andy Reid.

"I want to thank the lord for blessing our family with all these incredible people, who helped bring these championship home.

"To the Chiefs kingdom, you guys are world champions once again."

Related items

  • Coronavirus: Brady overcame big hurdle in moving to Tampa amid COVID-19 crisis Coronavirus: Brady overcame big hurdle in moving to Tampa amid COVID-19 crisis

    Tom Brady admitted his move from the New England Patriots to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers has been made more difficult due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    Brady swapped the Patriots for the Buccaneers via NFL free agency following 20 seasons in Foxborough, where he won six Super Bowl championships.

    The transition from New England to Tampa, however, has not been easy for the 42-year-old superstar quarterback amid the COVID-19 crisis.

    "The biggest hurdle I've overcome recently I would say would be a transition of moving my life from one area where it's been for 20 years to a completely different area," Brady told reporters.

    "That's been a big transition getting to know a new community, albeit in some very unique times, but also transitioning my life, getting a lot of my personal life moved to a new place and entering into new professional relationships with people and having to do that over FaceTime or Zoom calls.

    "I think we're all just trying to do the best we can do at this point. It's a unique experience for us all and everyone is trying to make it work the best they can.

    "For me, we're in a unique situation now where we're all home together and I think that's a great thing that I've experienced the last month, being in a house all together and getting to know each other in ways that we could never have if we'd been pulled in different directions.

    "My kids are off at school and my wife's travelling, or I'm travelling, fulfilling different obligations. The reality is my family is very important to me, my career is very important to me and I've had a great time focusing on those two things the last four weeks."

    Professional sports are returning in the United States, where there have been more than 3.2 million confirmed cases of coronavirus and over 135,800 deaths.

    The MLS is Back Tournament started on Wednesday, while the NBA (July 31) and MLB (July 23) seasons are preparing to resume this month after leagues were suspended in March.

  • Coronavirus: NFL plans to stop players exchanging jerseys, embracing rivals after games Coronavirus: NFL plans to stop players exchanging jerseys, embracing rivals after games

    The NFL sees no problem with players touching, sweating and breathing on one another in games, but as soon as the final whistle blows, it may be time for opposing players to immediately social distance.

    League officials informed teams on Thursday of plans that could see players prohibited from post-game interactions within six feet of each other in an effort to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.

    It means exchanging jerseys, hugging and handshakes will be off limits, if the proposals, reported by the league's own NFL Network, get the go-ahead.

    A jersey swap among opposing players has been a familiar sight on the field after games, as has been the obligatory embrace between each team's starting quarterback, but neither look like being permitted for the 2020 season, which is due to start on September 10.

    The NFL's thinking was mocked by Richard Sherman, the San Francisco 49ers cornerback, who questioned how it can be "deemed unsafe" to carry out the swap given all the contact that has gone before.

    As part of the 11-page document sent to each team outlining game-day protocol plans, teams have reportedly also been informed that players and coaches would not be required to wear masks on the sideline but other sideline personnel will be required to wear a face covering.

    Media will also not be allowed in the locker room and anyone who arrives at the stadium and records a temperature at or above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit will not be permitted to enter.

    A report on NFL.com cited the NFL Network story, while adding: "The proposed protocols are set to be in effect during any preseason action, if agreed to. As are all things during the pandemic, they're subject to change as the science, data and situations develop."

  • Hamilton ditched Kaepernick tribute after being told of 'potential consequences' Hamilton ditched Kaepernick tribute after being told of 'potential consequences'

    Lewis Hamilton was warned he faced "potential consequences" if he wore a helmet paying tribute to Colin Kaepernick and therefore abandoned the plan.

    Former NFL quarterback Kaepernick has been a divisive figure in the United States since he kneeled for the national anthem to protest social inequality and police brutality.

    The demonstration has been adopted across the sporting world in recent weeks following the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis.

    Hamilton, Formula One's reigning champion and first black driver, was among those to follow suit as his season started last weekend.

    But the Briton revealed ahead of the Styrian Grand Prix that he had initially planned a display relating to Kaepernick at the sport's American event.

    "I was advised from outside, from someone in the States who was really quite high up, that it wasn't the time for me to be doing so," Hamilton explained.

    "There were potential consequences for me doing it, so that's why they advised me not to do it. I don't remember who else was involved. It's not particularly important.

    "I do still have that helmet that I've done for Colin. And I did speak to Colin about it, who was super supportive.

    "I'm grateful that I was able to do it [take the knee] last weekend, and continue on the great movement I think he initially started [that] so many are continuing on today."

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.