NFL

Ravens RB Ingram misses practice due to calf injury

By Sports Desk January 07, 2020

Baltimore Ravens star Mark Ingram missed practice on Tuesday as the running back continues to deal with a calf injury.

Ingram missed the Ravens' final game of the regular season – a 28-10 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers on December 29 – after hurting his calf a week earlier.

The 30-year-old sat out practice on Tuesday, just four days out from the Ravens' clash against the Tennessee Titans.

Ingram scored 15 touchdowns during the regular season – the fourth most in the NFL – in his 15 appearances.

The Ravens, who finished the regular season with a 14-2 record, host the Titans in the AFC Divisional Round.

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