It was a decade full of skill, unforgettable moments and remarkable storylines.

Grand slam titles, Olympic Games gold medals, Rugby World Cups, Women's World Cups and more.

However, the impact and influence of some athletes proved more transcending than others.

We look at the most influential sports people of the past decade as we prepare to farewell the 2010s.

 

COLIN KAEPERNICK

Kaepernick has never swayed from his beliefs, even if it cost him a career in the NFL.

Following five years with the San Francisco 49ers, Kaepernick hit the headlines when he kneeled during the United States national anthem in 2016.

The quarterback cited racial injustice and police brutality. He filed a grievance against the NFL in 2017, accusing owners of colluding to keep him out of a job. Kaepernick settled that grievance in February.

Despite some backlash, the 32-year-old inspired a nation – receiving support from Nike, Serena Williams, LeBron James, Megan Rapinoe and others. He even refused to meet the NFL's demands for a workout in November – all but ending his career. For Kaepernick, it has always been about more than American football…

SIYA KOLISI

South Africa captain Siya Kolisi lifted the Rugby World Cup in November. However, his influence stretches much further than a rugby pitch.

In a country embroiled in economic turmoil and racial unrest, Kolisi – the Springboks' first black captain in their 127-year history – is a beacon of hope.

Having come from an area marked by unemployment and lack of opportunity, Kolisi has become a household name and a genuine inspirational star, who can help unite a nation.

MEGAN RAPINOE

Outspoken on and off the field, Women's World Cup winner and United States star Rapinoe has transcended football.

From LGBT rights, gender equality and racial quality, Rapinoe has led the fights.

The 34-year-old has drawn the ire of US president Donald Trump, and even called out FIFA over the gulf in prize money for the women's and men's World Cups as she strives to make football and the world a better place, while maintaining her dominance on the pitch – winning the 2019 Ballon d'Or Feminin, last year's Golden Ball and Golden Boot.

ANDY MURRAY

A three-time grand slam champion and former world number one, Murray's lasting legacy may be his fight for gender equality – not just his on-court achievements.

Not one to keep quiet, just watch him play tennis, Murray has championed against sexism, especially after hiring Amelie Mauresmo as his coach in 2014. 

In 2015, Murray wrote: "Have I become a feminist? If being a feminist is about fighting so that a woman is treated like a man then I suppose I have."

SIMONE BILES

This decade saw the emergence of a gymnastics sensation, yielding four Olympic gold medals in 2016 and 19 World Championships golds - 25 in total - over the past six years.

Biles is the most decorated artistic gymnast of all time at just 22 years of age, establishing herself as one of the best athletes in the world in the face of adversity.

The once-in-a-lifetime talent won five gold medals in Stuttgart, while dealing with the Larry Nassar sexual abuse scandal.

In 2018, she claimed she was sexually abused by ex-Team USA gymnastics sports doctor Nassar, encouraging others to do the same. She continues to influence the sport in innumerable ways. 

ANTHONY JOSHUA

In a decade dominated by UFC and the emergence of mixed-martial arts, Joshua has stood tall for boxing. Flying the flag in the ring, the heavyweight champion consistently attracts crowds that have never been seen in British boxing.

A game-changer for the sport, Joshua has broadened boxing's appeal beyond traditional audiences. For his bout against Wladimir Klitschko at Wembley in April 2017, a post-ward record crowd of 90,000 attended.

An estimated 80,000 spectators also took in his clash with Carlos Takam in Cardiff six months later. Joshua also took a title fight to Saudi Arabia in December - regaining his belts.

ALEX ZANARDI

Zanardi survived one of the most horrific non-fatal crashes in the history of open-wheel racing. The Italian lost both his legs in 2001, while he was also red his last rites.

However, Zanardi – who said he went 50 minutes with less than a litre of blood and his heart stopped beating seven times – was not done.

The former CART champion turned to paracycling and won two gold medals in his 2012 Paralympics debut, followed by another two in 2016.

CASTER SEMENYA

A two-time Olympic Games gold medallist and athletics star, it has been a tough end to the decade for Semenya but the South African inspired a nation in 2019.

She missed the World Athletics Championships in October after the IAAF proposed regulations regarding athletes with differences of sex development (DSD).

The new rule instructed athletes such as Semenya – who compete in events from the 400m to a mile, to take medication to lower their testosterone levels to take part in women's track events.

Despite lengthy legal battles and years of questions, Semenya continued to fight for her rights, leading to a Nike video in which she spoke about acceptance, self-love and respecting people for who they are. "I'm one kind of an athlete. I run my own race. It's all about me," said Semenya.

Andy Murray will miss the Australian Open as a precautionary measure after suffering an injury setback.

Murray feared his career may be over when he withdrew from the first grand slam of 2019 in Melbourne due to a long-term hip injury.

The three-time grand slam champion underwent career-saving hip resurfacing surgery last January and made his comeback only five months later.

Murray won the European Open in October and was expected to play in his first major singles tournament for a year next month, but is taking no chances.

"I've worked so hard to get myself into a situation where I can play at the top level and I’m gutted I’m not going to be able to play in Australia in January," said the 32-year-old, who will also miss the ATP Cup.

"After the AO this year, when I wasn't sure whether I'd be able to play again, I was excited about coming back to Australia and giving my best, and that makes this even more disappointing for me.

"Unfortunately I've had a setback recently and as a precaution, need to work through that before I get back on court competing."

Murray last month revealed he opted not to take any risks with a "bit of an issue" after only playing once for Great Britain in their run to the Davis Cup semi-finals.

Tennis Australia chief executive Craig Tiley said: "I know how excited Andy was about coming back to compete in Australia in January, and how disappointed he is not to make it for 2020,

"Andy's last match at the Australian Open was a five-set roller coaster [against Roberto Bautista Agut in the first round this year] that none of us who witnessed it will ever forget. His determination and iron will was on display for all to see, and it's that fighting spirit that has driven him to come back from a potentially career-ending injury to achieve the results he has this year.

"Although we will miss him in January, we wish him all the very best for his recovery and look forward to seeing him back on court very soon."

It was a decade dominated by the 'Big Three' and they delivered on multiple occasions on the biggest stages.

Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic dominated the decade in men's tennis, winning 33 of the 40 grand slams on offer.

Djokovic claimed 15 of those, while Nadal (13) and Federer (five) built on what they had started in the early-to-mid 2000s.

And, when they matched up in deciders, the trio of greats produced some epic finals.

The women's decade was far more varied despite Serena Williams' dominance – the American winning 12 majors since 2010 – as they too delivered some enthralling deciders.

We take a look at some of the best major finals of the decade.

 

2012 Australian Open: Novak Djokovic bt. Rafael Nadal 5-7 6-4 6-2 6-7 (5-7) 7-5

In arguably the most gruelling grand slam final ever, Djokovic outlasted Nadal in a five-set thriller in Melbourne.

The all-time greats produced an epic battle that lasted five hours and 53 minutes – the longest slam final in history.

Nadal needed a comeback in the fourth-set tie-break just to stay alive in the decider, famously dropping to his knee in celebration after getting to a fifth.

But the Spaniard would cough up a break lead in the final set as Djokovic claimed an incredible win for his fifth grand slam crown.

2014 Wimbledon: Novak Djokovic bt. Roger Federer 6-7 (7-9) 6-4 7-6 (7-4) 5-7 6-4

A Federer-Djokovic final at the All England Club always delivers.

This one looked set to be a little more straightforward as Djokovic led two-sets-to-one and held a 5-2 advantage in the fourth.

However, Federer reeled off five straight games to force a decider.

Both players had their chances in the fifth set but Djokovic took his to clinch the title.

Federer finished with 75 winners and 29 unforced errors, while Djokovic had 68 and 27 respectively in a match he described as the "best quality grand slam final" he had played in.

 

2017 Australian Open: Roger Federer bt. Rafael Nadal 6-4 3-6 6-1 3-6 6-3

This was quite the occasion as two of the best ever went head to head in a grand slam final for the first time since 2011.

Its importance was also highlighted by the fact Federer held 17 majors to Nadal's 14 heading into the match, and can be understood even more greatly at the end of 2019 now that the pair are on 20 and 19 respectively.

As expected, the pair produced in front of an adoring Melbourne crowd.

After a to-and-fro battle to begin the final, Federer came from 3-1 down in the deciding set, having taken a medical time-out after the fourth.

2017 French Open: Jelena Ostapenko bt. Simona Halep 4-6 6-4 6-3

A stunning run at Roland Garros was completed in fine fashion – with an incredible comeback.

The unseeded Ostapenko may have accepted her run to the final was an achievement enough after the Latvian fell a set and 3-0 down to the tournament favourite.

Ostapenko may have levelled the match, but she then found herself 3-1 behind in the decider.

But, she produced another response, her first WTA Tour title coming at the French Open.

 

2019 Australian Open: Naomi Osaka bt. Petra Kvitova 7-6 (7-2) 5-7 6-4

Ostapenko may have delivered a huge comeback, but Osaka's ability to keep her cool against Kvitova at Melbourne Park earlier this year was even more impressive.

The Japanese star's maiden major win had been overshadowed by Williams' outburst at Flushing Meadows just months earlier and it seemed a potential second major title had been thrown away.

Osaka took the first set and led 5-3 with three championship points in the second, only to somehow drop the set altogether.

That would be enough to break even the greatest, let alone a 21-year-old on one of the sport's grandest stages.

Instead, Osaka composed herself, closing out an amazing victory for her second major title.

2019 Wimbledon: Novak Djokovic bt. Roger Federer 7-6 (7-5) 1-6 7-6 (7-4) 4-6 13-12 (7-3)

A history-making decider lasted just under five hours and, once again, Federer was left to rue a missed chance against Djokovic at the All England Club.

Djokovic saved two championship points in the fifth set as the two greats went to a final-set tie-break – the first in singles at Wimbledon. 

The Serbian edged it to win a 16th grand slam title, as not even 94 winners from the Swiss superstar were enough

Federer won 14 more points, hit 40 more winners and created 13 break points to eight, but was beaten.

Novak Djokovic led the way in a decade of dominance in men's tennis but it was a very different story in the women's game, as 20 different players claimed grand slam titles.

Djokovic won all but one of his 16 majors in the previous 10 years, with Rafael Nadal adding 13 to his tally to move just one adrift of Roger Federer's record haul of 20.

Only six men were grand slam champions in the past decade; Federer on five occasions, Stan Wawrinka and Andy Murray securing three apiece and Marin Cilic winning the 2014 US Open.

It has been much more difficult to predict which women will land the big prizes in the game, summed up by the fact there were four different winners in 2019.

Ash Barty and Bianca Andreescu claimed maiden major titles, while Naomi Osaka and Simona Halep won their second to prevent Serena Williams from matching Margaret Court's record total of 24.

We look back at how the leading lights have measured up in the 2010s and take a glimpse at what might unfold in the next 10 years.

 

RAFA CLOSING IN, SWEET 16 FOR DJOKOVIC

Nadal won three of the four majors in 2010 and added another two this year, further trimming Federer's advantage.

World number one Nadal only failed to win the French Open twice in the decade, while Djokovic was a six-time Australian Open champion and scooped a quintet of Wimbledon crowns.

Federer has been stuck on 20 grand slam triumphs since going back-to-back in Australia in 2018, with the most recent seven won by either Djokovic or Nadal.

Not since Wawrinka's success at Flushing Meadows in 2016 has a player other than Nadal, Djokovic or Federer won a men's grand slam singles title. 

 

SERENA WINS A DOZEN, BUT SHORT OF COURT

Williams confirmed her status as one of the all-time greats by winning a further 12 major singles titles since the turn of the decade.

The 38-year-old has remained on 23 since defeating her sister, Venus, when she was pregnant in the 2017 Australian Open final.

Williams has lost all four major finals since the birth of her daughter, Alexis Olympia, including the past two against Halep and Andreescu at Wimbledon and in New York respectively.

Angelique Kerber claimed three grand slams in the 2010s, while Kim Clijsters, Maria Sharapova, Li Na, Victoria Azarenka, Petra Kvitova, Halep, Garbine Muguruza and Osaka won two apiece.

 

ONUS ON NEXT GEN MEN TO STEP UP

While there had been concerns over what was to come with so many legends heading towards, or already in, the twilight of their careers, exciting talent has emerged in both the men

While there were concerns over what was to come with so many legends heading towards, or already in, the twilight of their careers, exciting talent has emerged in both the men's and women's game.  

Canadian teenager Andreescu capped a breakthrough season by winning the US Open, while world number one Barty is only 23 and the likes of Halep still have plenty of time on their side.

With Federer aged 38, Nadal 33, Djokovic 32 and Murray - hoping to work his way back up the rankings after recovering from hip surgery - also in his 30s, there will be a changing of the guard in the next decade.

Stefanos Tsitsipas gave another example of his huge potential by winning the ATP Finals title, while Dominic Thiem has been beaten by Nadal in the past two French Open finals.

Daniil Medvedev, Alexander Zverev, Felix Auger-Aliassime and Denis Shapovalov will also be hoping to come of age in the 2020s.

British tennis player Jay Clarke has revealed he experiences racist abuse "nine days out of 10".

The 21-year-old is ranked 154th in singles by the ATP and played Roger Federer on Court No. 1 in the second round of Wimbledon this year.

Clarke spoke out about the hostility he faces because of the colour of his skin in response to a message from fellow British player Liam Broady highlighting a societal problem.

Broady wrote on Twitter: "When one of my best mates gets chased home for simply walking past a pub at night and has to hide in bushes to avoid getting beaten up because of his skin colour how can you claim racism doesn't exist in this country?

"This problem seems to be getting worse to me, not better."

British number five Clarke responded to Broady, saying: "Not this extreme but I experience something like this at least once a day 9 days out of 10."

The comments follow a spate of allegations of racist incidents at English football stadiums, which have led to calls for the UK government to carry out an inquiry into how such abuse from supporters is feared to have become commonplace in the sport.

Clarke last year explained how he regularly received racist messages on social media after losing tennis matches.

He told BBC Radio Derby at the time: "It's happened a few times now so I just block them and move on with my life. They are sad people."

Rafael Nadal says rising stars Daniil Medvedev and Stefanos Tsitsipas can push for grand slam glory as the old guard face up to the "brutal" reality they cannot go on forever.

Nadal admits it is an inevitability his tennis career is coming towards the end of its shelf life, and that the same applies to the likes of Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic.

Between them, Nadal, Federer and Djokovic have amassed a startling 55 grand slam singles titles, with all three going beyond the previous record haul of 14 majors achieved by Pete Sampras that many expected would stand for decades.

Federer is 38, Nadal turns 34 next June and Djokovic will be 33 in May. It is no small wonder all three remain serious contenders for every grand slam, having already dominated men's tennis for over a decade.

There would be genuine surprise if the Australian Open men's singles final on February 2 does not feature at least one of the trio, given that aside from Stan Wawrinka's 2015 triumph they have shut out the opposition in Melbourne since 2006.

Yet Tsitsipas won the ATP Finals in November for the biggest win of the 21-year-old Greek's career, while Medvedev had a stellar 2019, particularly on hard courts over the summer, with Nadal having to dig deep to deny the Russian in a remarkable US Open final.

Asked about the 'NextGen' players, Nadal told AS: "It's normal that there's a buzz around them and it will get louder because we're getting older every day and they're getting better every day.

"Every year they're improving. I think that they can win the biggest tournaments, like Medvedev, Tsitsipas and [Dominic] Thiem did this year.

"I think that [Denis] Shapovalov is going to make a big step up this year and [Jannik] Sinner's trajectory is incredible.

"They're here to stay. We're still around but the cycle of life is brutal and at some point that's going to change, and sooner rather than later."

Nadal is surprised he remains at the top of the game, having ended the year as world number one for the fifth time.

He bought into talk early in his career that his hard-grafting playing style would not be conducive to a long stint in the game.

"To be honest, at this stage of my life I didn’t think I’d still be playing tennis," Nadal said.

"I was told because of my style I wouldn’t have a very long career. I believed what I was told, so I thought that by now I’d be retired and starting a family."

Rafael Nadal says it is impossible to compare his tennis rivalry with Roger Federer to the clash of the football titans between Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi.

The similarity has often been suggested, based on the rationale that Federer and Messi are aesthetically extraordinary while Nadal and Ronaldo are machine-like in their winning nature and physically immense.

Ronaldo's Juventus club-mate, goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon, floated the theory in October, saying the "comparison is obvious and makes me smile".

The football rivalry was never greater when Ronaldo was at Real Madrid, as it put him and his club in direct opposition to Messi at Barcelona.

Messi recently went past Ronaldo's haul of Ballon d'Or triumphs when he took his sixth award, crowning him as the world's top player for this year.

But Nadal, whose French Open and US triumphs in 2019 took him to 19 grand slam titles, one behind all-time leader Federer, scotched the idea that players in one sport can be likened to those from another.

He told Marca.com: "No comparison is possible. They are two completely different sports and Messi's characteristics are not those of Federer nor are those of Cristiano like mine. Each one is as he is."

Nadal could pass 38-year-old Federer in 2020, and Novak Djokovic is also in the race to finish with the most slams, sitting on 16 to date.

But Nadal says the grand slam record would be a by-product of his dedication rather than the result of chasing it down as a main objective.

"It's not important to me, if only I'm given this title," Nadal said. "I understand for you, the media, the journalists, you have to write about this.

"For me, it's already satisfying to form part of the history of our sport.

"I've been training and making an effort since I was eight. Being where I am at 33 is already an incredible achievement.

"We're in numbers that were unimaginable. People can already think who is the best and who isn't. For me, it's a great honour to be in this group."

A record 71million Australian Dollars in prize money will be on the line at next month's Australian Open in Melbourne.

Men's and women's singles champions will each collect 4.12m AUD following an increase of 13.6 per cent on the 2019 purse.

Players losing in the first round of the singles main draw will earn 90,000 AUD, up 20 per cent, while semi-finalists will take home 1.04m AUD – an increase of 13 per cent.

"We have long been committed to improving the pay and conditions for a deeper pool of international tennis players, in fact since AO 2007 prize money has more than tripled from 20m AUD to the 71m AUD for 2020 we are announcing today," Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley said on Tuesday.

"This year, as we do every year, we worked with the tours to establish the weighting for prize money increases round-by-round, and we pushed to reward players competing early in the tournament in both singles and doubles. 

"We strongly believe in growing prize money at all levels of the game and we will continue to work with the playing group to create viable career paths in the sport and enable more players to make more money."

Novak Djokovic will be eyeing a record-extending eighth Australian Open crown when he returns to defend his title at Melbourne Park.

Meanwhile, Japanese star Naomi Osaka is the defending champion in the women's singles.

 

Lucas Pouille, a semi-finalist at the Australian Open this year, has withdrawn from next month's tournament in Melbourne.

The Frenchman, ranked 22 in the world, announced on Monday he would not be participating in the first grand slam of the year, which starts on January 20.

Pouille, 25, has also withdrawn from the ATP Cup, where he was set to represent France along with Gael Monfils and Benoit Paire.

He has not played since the Shanghai Masters in October after ending his season early with an elbow injury.

"Since October 9, we did everything needed to be ready for the beginning of the year," Paire wrote in a statement on social media, referencing the date of his last match of 2019 against John Isner in China.

"We have followed every medical protocol but unfortunately it was not enough. It's a huge disappointment for me to announce that I can't play the first edition of the ATP Cup, the Adelaide tournament, and that I won't play the Australian Open. 

"As you can imagine, I am very disappointed and sad. I am going to miss the beginning of the year, but the season is long, the career is long. 

"Now my goal is to be 100 per cent competitive as soon as possible, to come back stronger."

Pouille's last-four finish at the 2019 Australian Open was his best major performance. He lost to eventual champion Novak Djokovic after a run that had included wins over Milos Raonic and Borna Coric.

Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray were among the big winners as the recipients of the 2019 ATP Awards were announced on Thursday.

World number one Nadal was already certain to be the Player of the Year, having ended the season on top of the rankings.

But he also collected the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award, voted for by his fellow players, for the second straight year.

Nadal won the French Open and US Open, beating Dominic Thiem and Daniil Medvedev respectively, to take his career tally to 19 majors.

There were no surprises as Murray was named the Comeback Player of the Year less than 12 months after he announced plans for retirement.

Murray was set to quit before undergoing hip resurfacing surgery, after which he starred on the doubles circuit, winning the Queen's Club Championships alongside Feliciano Lopez before playing with Serena Williams at Wimbledon.

The Briton then won the European Open in October, his first singles crown on the ATP Tour in 31 months.

Meanwhile, Jannik Sinner, the 18-year-old who ended the 2018 season ranked 763rd, was the Newcomer of the Year after his Next Gen ATP Finals success.

Fellow Italian Matteo Berrettini, who reached the US Open semi-finals and is now the world number eight, claimed the Most Improved Player of the Year honours.

Medvedev's stunning second half of the season did not go unnoticed, with coach Gilles Cervara the ATP Coach of the Year. The Russian played nine finals, winning four, in 2019.

Yet popular stars Roger Federer and Bob Bryan and Mike Bryan were not forgotten, collecting the Fans' Favourite awards.

Andy Murray opted not to take any risks with a "bit of an issue" after only playing once for Great Britain in their run to the Davis Cup semi-finals.

The former world number one recorded a three-set singles victory against Tallon Griekspoor of the Netherlands but did not feature again during the new-look tournament in Spain.

Murray instead cheered on his team-mates as they reached the last four in Madrid, where they lost to eventual champions Spain.

The Scotsman – who lifted his first title following hip surgery at the European Open in October – revealed a "mild" groin issue kept him off the court, though only after consultation with both medical staff and team captain Leon Smith.

"I had a bit of an issue with my groin, pelvis. I wanted to play but I wasn't allowed to risk it," he said, according to quotes in the Mirror.

"I took the final decision but I'm obviously speaking to my physio, doctor, speaking to Leon.

"I don't know exactly when I did it because I had a scan straight after the match with Tallon Griekspoor because my groin area was sore during the match.

"I had noticed it a little bit a couple of days in the build-up so I didn't know because after Antwerp I took 12 days off or something and didn't hit any balls, and then I slowly built up till I got over to Madrid and then started practising hard and I noticed it was a bit sore.

"It was more like a bony bruise. It’s mild. But that was something which if I had played on it, it could have got worse. And that's why it was difficult for me."

Murray was speaking prior to the premier of his Amazon Prime Video documentary - Andy Murray: Resurfacing - that charts his comeback from a career-threatening hip issue.

Roger Federer joked he may never retire from tennis as he continues to focus on extending his career for as long as possible.

World number three Federer turned 38 in August and has just rounded off a hugely successful tour with Alexander Zverev.

The 20-time grand slam winner won four titles this season, while he missed out on glory at Wimbledon after losing in an epic final against Novak Djokovic.

Federer has recently invested in Swiss-based shoe company On Running, but he insists his business venture is not a sign he is set to stop playing the sport he loves. 

"I've been asked all week about how retirement is going to be and when it is going to come, I think they all needed to know," Federer said during his appearance on the Today Show.

"But no, this is not about retirement. On [the company] doesn't want me to retire, they want me to play as long as possible and that is my goal. I will never retire!"

Federer did acknowledge, however, that he is looking forward to the freedom his eventual retirement will bring, considering the impact tennis has on the rest of his life.

"I like my sweets, desserts, time off," he said. "I start my planning for the year around where I'm going to go on vacation with my family, and that's where I'll be in a couple of days, on the beach, so I can't wait.

"Actually, when I had my knee issues in 2016 and I was rehabbing for almost eight months, I felt like that could be my life after [retirement].

"Of course I was never as busy but it was just nice to be able to have schedules with friends – lunch on Wednesdays, dinners on Fridays, let's have a good time on the weekends together with another family. I’m really looking forward to that."

Federer's tour included matches against Zverev in Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Ecuador. The pair were due to play in Colombia too, but a curfew in Bogota meant the exhibition was called off.

"It was absolutely crazy," Federer said of the tour. "We played in four cities, almost in front of 100,000 people and Mexico City, had 42,000 people, double of Arthur Ashe Stadium here in New York.

"Breaking those records, doing it with Zverev, it's not something I ever thought I would do."

Roger Federer and Alexander Zverev shattered the world record for attendance at a tennis match.

A crowd of 42,217 watched an exhibition match between Federer and Zverev at Plaza de Toros Mexico – the world's largest bullring – in Mexico City on Saturday.

Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters had previously set the record in their exhibition contest in 2010, which attracted 35,681 fans in Brussels.

But that figure was topped as 20-time grand slam champion Federer defeated Zverev 3-6 6-4 6-2 in the "The Greatest Match".

Afterwards, Federer tweeted: "I will never forget this magical evening in Mexico City with @AlexZverev 42,517 people came, We broke this record together! Viva Mexico."

Andy Murray will not feature for Great Britain in their Davis Cup quarter-final tie against Germany on Friday after Kyle Edmund was once again picked for singles action.

Murray was rested for the Group E victory over Kazakhstan on Thursday that secured Great Britain's place in the knockout stages of the new-look tournament in Spain. 

Captain Leon Smith admitted after the 2-1 win that he was unsure if the Scot - who had laboured to a three-set victory over Tallon Griekspoor of the Netherlands in his team's opening outing - would return to the line-up.

And Edmund, who played instead against Kazakhstan, recording an impressive victory over Mikhail Kukushkin, has retained his spot in the line-up.

His opponent in the opening match will be Philipp Kohlschreiber, with Dan Evans then going up against Jan-Lennard Struff.

If required, Jamie Murray and Neal Skupski will once again team up for the doubles. Kevin Krawietz and Andreas Mies are scheduled to be their opponents.

The winners of the tie will go up against either Argentina or hosts Spain - who also meet in Friday's second session in Madrid - in the last four.

In the other half of the draw, Russia knocked out Novak Djokovic's Serbia courtesy of a hard-fought doubles win, Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov saving three match points before eventually prevailing. Next up will be Canada, who qualified for the semi-finals on Thursday.

Denis Shapovalov and Vasek Pospisil sent Australia packing as Alex de Minaur's singles victory proved fruitless in the first Davis Cup quarter-final.

With Pospisil defeating John Millman 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 in the opening match, Australia relied on a comeback from De Minaur to haul themselves level.

Next Gen ATP Finals runner up De Minaur – Australia's star player in Thursday's tie with Nick Kyrgios sitting out – did it the hard way, coming from a set down to beat Shapovalov 3-6 6-3 7-5 and tee up a deciding doubles encounter.

But Canada were too good in the doubles – Pospisil picking up where he left off while Shapovalov bounced back from his loss in style via a 6-4 6-4 win.

A break of serve in the opening game against Australian counterparts Jordan Thompson and John Peers paved the way for the pair to claim the first set with ease.

Thompson and Peers looked set to take the match all the way when they earned a 3-0 lead in set two, only for Shapovalov and Pospisil to restore parity before pushing on to seal progression with their first match point.

Serbia play Russia, Argentina face Spain and Great Britain go up against Germany in the other quarter-final ties, which will be played on Friday.

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