Scotland lock Jonny Gray out of rest of Six Nations with hand injury

By Sports Desk February 10, 2020

Scotland lock Jonny Gray will miss the rest of the Six Nations due to a hand injury.

The Glasgow Warriors forward was hurt during the 13-6 defeat to England at Murrayfield on Saturday.

Scottish Rugby confirmed in a statement that Gray will return to his club side for further treatment.

The 25-year-old, who started the losses to England and Ireland, will sit out the remaining Tests away to Italy and Wales and at home against France.

Gregor Townsend's side earned two losing bonus points from their opening matches.

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