Jamaica selects team for World Rugby Challenger Series next month

By January 20, 2020

Conan Osborne will lead a 15-man squad named to represent Jamaica 7s at the inaugural World Rugby Challenger Series Tournament to be held in Chile & Uruguay February 15-23, 2020.

After a rigorous selection process, Head Coach Stephen Lewis was finally able to select a squad in what he described as a difficult process.

“There were some hard decisions to make given the increased competition for places on the team,” he said.

“That having been said, this is a strong squad with a good balance of veterans and younger players. These tournaments are a great opportunity for Jamaica to showcase its’ talents and break into the top 20.”

The full squad includes Rhodri Adamson (Chile only), Anthony Bingham, Tyler Bush, Mason Caton-Brown, Omari Caro, Dylan Davies, Oshane Edie, Mikel Facey, Dyneal Fessell, Conan Osborne (captain), Samuel Rees, Lucas Roy-Smith, Mike St. Claire.

non-travelling reserves: Omar Dixon, Andrew Simpson

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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