I'm unemployed after the World Cup - Edwards' Wigan move in doubt

By Sports Desk March 17, 2019

Shaun Edwards' return to Wigan Warriors could be off after the Wales defence coach stated he will "consider all offers" for a new role after the Rugby World Cup. 

Edwards was unveiled by Wigan at a press conference last August and was due to take over as head coach of his hometown club next year.

The Wigan legend agreed to succeed Adrian Lam after fulfilling his commitments with new Six Nations champions Wales, but says he has not signed a contract to take charge of the Super League giants.

"On my future, my next step really is to sign a contract, I haven't signed a contract with anybody yet," said Edwards, who has been linked with Wasps.

"I haven't signed a contract. The only team I'm not going to go to is Wales, because the new coach [Wayne Pivac] is going in a different direction.

"He wants to do something different. So that's where I'm at at the moment. So as it stands, come the end of the World Cup I'm unemployed."

Edwards added: "I agreed with Wigan and thought we would sign a contract,

"But then Wigan said, 'it's okay, we'll sign one later', and I thought that was unusual. And that was nine months ago. I agreed to go to Wigan, but I never signed a contract.

"I'll consider all offers, league, union. All I can say is that I haven't signed anything with anybody."
 

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