Carib players in Suncorp Super Netball hit by 70 per cent pay cut

By March 31, 2020

Netball players in the Suncorp Super Netball in Australia have agreed to 70 per cent pay cut in light of the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic sweeping the globe and that has prevented the league from getting started this season.

Jamaica’s Jhanielle Fowler of the West Coast Fever and Trinidad and Tobago’s Samantha Wallace of the New South Wales Swifts confirmed the development to Sportsmax.TV on Tuesday. They are among seven Caribbean players in the SSN.

“The players have agreed to this, even though it will affect us all across the board really badly, we have agreed to it given the situation the organisation has been placed in,” Fowler said.

“Hopefully, after they have reviewed it things will be better for us as players but for now it is what it is.”

Wallace revealed that the review should happen in a matter of weeks.

“It's hard but it's for the best and I think it's only for three weeks,” she said. “Yes, it will affect people. You have rent to pay, health insurance to pay and you have to save something but it’s only for three weeks. Hopefully, things will settle and we will be back to normal.”

The SSN Commission contacted the players association about a week ago to discuss the possibility of wage cuts among other issues. According to Wallace, the players didn’t have much to discuss given the situation.

Fowler, meanwhile, said while the situation would be difficult for players she remains hopeful things will change for the better soon.

“A pay cut of 70 per cent is not ideal. Especially in a foreign country, it is going to be difficult times and hard to cope but we do have faith in the organisation around us that they will support us. They will not let us go hungry.

“Hopefully, we will be okay for the coming times. Hopefully, this thing can be curtailed and the league can start and we will be able to go back to full salary.”

 

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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