Seymour Rose honoured with launch of inaugural Rose Cup at Caymanas

By December 18, 2020

The inaugural Rose Cup, being staged in honour of late Jamaican golfer Seymour Rose, was launched the Caymanas Golf Club in St. Catherine on Thursday. 

Mayberry Investments will be the title sponsor for the tournament that will be held from December 29 to 30 at the Caymanas Golf Club and will feature 12-member teams of professionals and amateurs.

The format will be both team and individual match play with one point being awarded for a win and a half point for a draw. 

The play format yields a maximum of 22 points with the first team to get eleven and a half points or more to be declared the winner.  If the teams are tied there will be a sudden death play-off at holes 1, 2, 17 and 18 until a winner is determined. 

Rose, rated as one of Jamaica's best golfers, is among a select group to have won the prestigious Jamaica Open three times.  He did so in 1977, 1982 and 1987. He played for more than 50 years and served the sport as an instructor, manager and superintendent.  He also represented Jamaica at the Caribbean Golf Championships. 

His daughter Sheree Rose lauded the gesture. “He has left quite a legacy and I am proud to be his daughter.  I felt thrilled.  It was just so amazing to know that even in death he is still remembered because his life touched so many," she said while wishing the participants the best of luck for the competition. 

No cash prize will be awarded to the winners but some player costs like transportation and caddie fees will be absorbed by the organizers. 

Among the professionals confirmed for the tournament are Sebert Walker, the non-playing captain, Raymond Brown, Wesley Brown, Martin Butt, Lloyd Campbell, Orville Christie, Allan Graham, Sean Green, Kevin McDonald, Jonathan Newnham (vice-captain), Ricardo Perry, Alford Robinson and Michael Rowe.

"I expect that it will be a fun-filled competition,” said Green. 

“The Rose Cup is similar to a Ryder format which I don't think we have ever really had in Jamaica before.  It’s exciting to see all of the good golfers, what we call our elite golfers in Jamaica, playing together and just for bragging rights and so on.

“It excites us to have this tournament to have something to look forward to annually and the fact that it’s the Rose Cup which is Mr. Seymour Rose, it gives us the professionals a little more spark to want to win this trophy." 

The amateurs will be comprised of Justin Burrowes, John Dunbar, William Knibbs, Tommy Lee, Mark Newnham, Rocco Lopez, Phillip Prendergast, John O'Donoghue, Jack Stein, Sebert Walker Jr. and Shamar Wilson. 

"I believe that the amateur team is packing a lot of talent.  I believe that the guys are in good shape,” said Sean Morris, who is also co-chair for the organizing committee but who is also down to play. 

“I believe they are hungry because they did not have the Caribbean championships to play this year so I believe they are looking forward to this event as the marque event on the calendar this year."  

He also said that he was hoping to play well. 

Meanwhile, co-chair of the organizing committee Major Desmon Brown expressed his gratitude to the sponsors, who helped make the tournament possible. 

“It’s difficult at this time to get sponsors but we got Mayberry, Sports Development Foundation and some other sponsors who came on board.  I think it is a great event.  A couple of guys have been talking for a long time to me about it and there is always this banter between the amateurs and the professionals - who is better so we came up with this idea.  We are very happy that we have reached this far," he said. 

In addition to Mayberry, the Rose Cup has also attracted sponsorship from Body Forte, Coffee Traders and Grab and Go; Sterling Asset Management, Versachem International, Karmak Construction, Billy Craig Insurance, Fontana Pharmacy and Fidelity Motors.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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