Hovland makes history by birdieing 72nd to win Mayakoba Golf Classic

By Sports Desk December 06, 2020

Viktor Hovland became the first player to make birdie at the 72nd hole to win the Mayakoba Golf Classic.

Hovland was tied for the lead alongside Aaron Wise on the final hole at El Camaleon Golf Club, where the Norwegian drained a birdie for the stunning walk-off victory.

The 23-year-old Hovland captured his second PGA Tour title with his clutch one-stroke triumph in Mexico on Sunday, having also won February's Puerto Rico Open.

Hovland, who posted a final-round 65 to finish 20 under, became the fifth European player since 1945 to claim multiple PGA Tour trophies before the age of 24, following Rory McIlroy (six), Seve Ballesteros (three), Sergio Garcia (three) and Jon Rahm (two).

"I don't really feel like I'm very good at those pressure situations," Hovland said afterwards.

"I was shaking there in the end - I thought I lost it after the second shot on 16 and made an awesome par there but missed a putt on 17 and knew I needed to make birdie on 18 and it just happened to go in.

"[I] don't feel comfortable in those moments at all."

American Wise had to settle for the runners-up cheque following his eight-under-par 63, while countrymen Adam Long (67) and Tom Hoge (69) ended the tournament 17 under.

Harris English (63), Billy Horschel (64) and Lucas Glover (66) were a stroke further back, while Brendon Todd (66) saw his title defence end in a tie for eighth, alongside Tony Finau (67), Carlos Ortiz (66) and overnight leader Emiliano Grillo (72).

Austin Eckroat became the third amateur to shoot a 65 or better in the final round of a non-major PGA Tour event since 1983.

Eckroat (65) earned a share of 12th position at 14 under, and he was joined by former world number one Justin Thomas (69), who was unable to maintain his title charge.

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