'I was just off' – Tiger Woods frustrated after rare last-place finish

By Sports Desk February 17, 2020

Tiger Woods explained he "was just off" as he digested finishing in last place of the 68 players to make the cut at the Genesis Invitational.

Champion Adam Scott finished 22 shots ahead of Woods, who ended round four at the bottom of the leaderboard for only the second time in his distinguished PGA Tour career.

The American, who has opted to not play the WGC-Mexico Championship after saying he was feeling "run-down", finished on 11 over par after disappointing rounds of 76 and 77 over the weekend.

But while Woods was frustrated with his performance at Riviera Country Club, the 44-year-old explained he has a new sense of perspective these days, and even showed his sense of humour.

"I was just off, it happens," Woods told reporters.

"I'm off and I have got a chance to have the week off on Monday and do a little prep, a little practicing, some training, be at home and all positive things.

"I did not do much well. Good news, I hit every ball forward, not backwards, a couple sideways! But overall, I'm done.

"I've been in this position many times, unfortunately. Just keep fighting hole by hole, shot by shot and try to make some birdies, which I did not do.

"It's still disappointing, it's still frustrating, I'm still a little ticked.

"But this part of my career really didn't exist a few years ago, so to be able to do that [play] no matter what I shoot, I also look at it from a perspective which I didn't do most of my career, that I have a chance to play going down the road.

"A few years ago, that wasn't the case."

Woods was asked if he wished he had the same level of perspective in his younger years.

He added: "Earlier in my career I figured I would have another 30 years of doing it, 40 years. Look at most of the players that have had pretty solid careers, three to four decades in our sport.

"So yeah, I thought I had a long time to be able to do this. I think it's year 23 now, that is a long time, but it's been pretty good."

Woods was the tournament host in California and while his personal performance, which included a four-putt for the second straight start, was not positive, he was thrilled with how everything else had gone.

"From a tournament perspective, it couldn't be any better," he said of the event, which had Invitational status for the first time.

"We've had perfect weather, people have come out and supported this event.

"Our elevation, being a part of the new Invitational status, look at the players that come out and supported this event that have played this week, we couldn't have asked for a more dream scenario.

"The golf course was fantastic. Everything couldn't have been any better from that side."

Woods remains level with Sam Snead on 82 PGA Tour titles, the all-time record, and has not confirmed his next tournament, with the Honda Classic and Arnold Palmer Invitational among his options in the coming weeks.

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    1987 - Local hero Mize leaves Norman stunned

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    2004 - Mickelson breaks major duck

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    2005 - 'That' Tiger Woods chip

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    2010: Angel Cabrera - An Argentine asado, a multi-course barbecue featuring chorizo, blood sausage, short ribs, beef filets and mollejas (the thymus gland/sweetbreads).

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    2016: Jordan Spieth - Salad of local greens; main course of Texas barbecue (beef brisket, smoked half chicken, pork ribs); sides of BBQ baked beans, bacon and chive potato salad, sauteed green beans, grilled zucchini, roasted yellow squash; dessert of warm chocolate chip cookie, vanilla ice cream.

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    2018: Sergio Garcia - International salad (ingredients representing the countries of past champions); arroz caldoso de bogavante (a traditional Spanish lobster rice); tres leches cake with tres leches ice cream. 

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    1994: Bernhard Langer - Turkey and dressing; black forest torte

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    1997: Nick Faldo - Fish and chips, tomato soup

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    2015: Bubba Watson - Traditional Caesar salad; grilled chicken breast with sides of green beans, mashed potatoes, corn, macaroni and cheese, served with cornbread; confetti cake and vanilla ice cream.

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    2017: Danny Willett - Mini cottage pies; a traditional Sunday roast (prime rib, roasted potatoes and vegetables, Yorkshire pudding); apple crumble and vanilla custard; coffee and tea with English cheese and biscuits, plus a selection of wines.

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    - With his 2019 victory, Woods became only the second player over the age of 40 to have won a major on US soil in the 21st century, with Vijay Singh having lifted the 2004 US PGA Championship when he was 41.

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    - Rory McIlroy just needs to add the Masters to his major collection to complete a career Grand Slam, which would see him join a club that includes Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Nicklaus and Woods.

    - The Masters is the only major tournament where Jordan Spieth has finished inside the Top 25 on each appearance (6/6).

    - Only one of the last 43 Masters tournaments saw a wire-to-wire victory – Spieth in 2015.

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