Hong Kong Open postponed amid unrest

By Sports Desk November 20, 2019

The Hong Kong Open has been postponed due to safety concerns amid the "ongoing level of social unrest", the European Tour has announced.

The tournament – co-sanctioned by the Asian Tour – was set to take place from November 28 to December 1 at the Hong Kong Golf Club, but organisers now hope to schedule it for early next year.

Keith Pelley, chief executive of the European Tour, said: "The decision has been taken due to the ongoing level of social unrest in Hong Kong.

"As the safety of our players, staff, stakeholders and everyone involved in each and every one of our tournaments around the world is our top priority, we feel this is the correct, but unfortunate, course of action.

"The European Tour thanks everyone at the Hong Kong Golf Association, the Hong Kong Golf Club and all persons associated with the Hong Kong Open for their hard work in endeavouring to stage the tournament and we look forward to hopefully returning early next year."

The event offers a prize fund of $2 million at the event, with 2750 Race to Dubai points awarded to the winner.

Former champions in Hong Kong include Rory McIlroy and Justin Rose.

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