Mayakoba Golf Classic to start on Friday after heavy rain

By Sports Desk November 14, 2019

The start of the Mayakoba Golf Classic has been pushed back to Friday after heavy rain in Playa del Carmen.

After initially delaying the start of play on Thursday, the PGA Tour later announced round one would begin on Friday.

"Due to wet course conditions and the likelihood of further storms, the start to R1 of @MayakobaGolf has been postponed until 7 a.m. Friday," it said, via Twitter.

Rain is again expected on Friday before the weather is forecast to begin clearing on the weekend.

American Jason Dufner withdrew from the tournament before the opening round and was replaced by Rob Oppenheim.

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