Gooch, Cook share lead after round one of the Houston Open

By Sports Desk October 10, 2019

American duo Austin Cook and Talor Gooch both shot eight-under par 64’s to share the lead after round one of the Houston Open.

The pair were red hot on the opening day at the Golf Club of Houston with Cook shooting 29 on the front nine, which included a run of four birdies and an eagle between holes five and nine.

Gooch, 28, managed to keep pace with his countryman with a round that included 10 birdies and two bogeys, as he seeks a maiden win on the PGA Tour.

"Any time you have double-digit birdies you’re doing something right," Gooch said.

"I drove it well, got the ball in the fairway, hit a lot of good iron shots and was able to make a few putts. It was a fun day."

Austrian Sepp Straka is a shot further back and is outright third on the leaderboard, while Russell Henley, Lanto Griffin and Tyler McCumber sit a shot further back at six-under.

Two-time runner-up Henrik Stenson could only manage an even-par round of 72.

Meanwhile, amateur golfer Cole Hammer scored a first-round 67 to currently sit three off the lead and in the mix at Humble.

The world number two (in the amateur rankings) had a mixed day with the driver but recovered on the green to tally eight birdies for the day, the second most by an amateur on the PGA Tour.

️ @cole_hammer6765 grew up in Houston attending @HouOpenGolf , watching stars like @McIlroyRory , Charles Howell III and @WestwoodLee .

Today, the 20-year-old takes the stage himself. pic.twitter.com/e6ESyP0BCl

— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) October 10, 2019 China’s Zhang Xinjun was the only afternoon start to shoot five-under as conditions became tougher later in the day.

 

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