All set for unveiling of Asafa Powell's statue in Kingston

By February 07, 2020

All is set for Sunday’s unveiling of the statue of Asafa Powell at Independence Park in Kingston, Jamaica.

The statue of the two-time world-record holder will be the fourth to be unveiled as part of the Jamaica 55 Legacy programme. Statues of Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Veronica Campbell-Brown and Usain Bolt were mounted over the past two years.

“This is the final of four statues that we commissioned as part of the Jamaica 55 Legacy programme to celebrate the achievements of our outstanding athletes,” said Jamaica’s Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange, who invited the public at large to attend the ceremony.

“The statues not only highlight Jamaican athletic success but will serve as inspiration for all of us about what is possible when we try. So I invite as many people as possible to join us on Sunday and celebrate with Asafa.”

Renowned Jamaican sculptor Basil Watson was engaged by the Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport designed all four statues.

Powell set the 100 metres world record twice, between June 2005 and May 2008 with times of 9.77 and 9.74 seconds, respectively. His personal best time off 9.72 s ranks as the fourth fastest wind-legal time in history.

He won bronze medals in the 100m at the World Championships in 2007 and 2009.

Powell also holds the world record for the number of times an athlete has broken the 10-second barrier, an incredible 97 times. However, he last broke the 10-second barrier in 2016.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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