Tokyo Games could be the greatest Olympics ever – AOC chief

By Sports Desk May 09, 2020

Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) president John Coates believes Tokyo in 2021 could be the greatest Games ever.

Scheduled for this year, the Tokyo Olympics were postponed until 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Coates believes the extra wait for a Games could position Tokyo to be the best Olympics of all-time.

"Because we all must wait longer than the already long wait for an Olympics, the Games of Tokyo will gently but perceptibly echo the sheer joy and relief of the other delayed Olympics of Antwerp in 1920 and London in 1948," he told the AOC annual general meeting on Saturday.

"Itself, begging the question: will Tokyo usurp Sydney as the greatest Games ever? I believe the Tokyo Olympics may ultimately be amongst the greatest Games ever, if not the greatest.

"And putting the parochialism of a proud Sydney boy aside and in the spirit of Citius, Altius, Fortius, I certainly hope Tokyo will be."

Looking further ahead, Queensland is expected to make a bid to host the 2032 Olympics.

Coates believes the Games would be just what the economy in the state needs after the coronavirus pandemic.

"There is already a need for jobs and growth in the Queensland economy arising from the impact of COVID-19," he said.

"Our partner three levels of government recognised a potential 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games as a critical part of the state and nation's economic recovery in the short term, quite apart from all of the long-term health, wellbeing, economic and sporting legacies.

"When they tell us the moment is right to do so, we will resume and elevate dialogue with the IOC [International Olympic Committee]. A decision could be as early as 2022 or 2023.

"The opportunity is clear and exciting."

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