A month ago it was reported the relationship between Utah Jazz team-mates Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert was "unsalvageable", but the pair are moving on.

Jazz executive vice-president of basketball operations Dennis Lindsey said the two All-Stars have since made up and are ready to move forward.

"They're ready to put this behind them, move forward, act professionally," Lindsey said on a conference call on Tuesday.

"Look, the night of March [11] was really unprecedented, it brought a microscope to our team, and we get it. With that said, we're very pleased with the collective makeup of our group – Donovan and Rudy in particular – and we look forward to moving forward.

"They've said their piece to each other. They've both visited at the ownership level, at management level, at the coaches' level, the players' level with each other, they're fully participating in our Zoom workouts."

Gobert became the first NBA player to test positive for coronavirus on March 11, which promptly triggered the league to suspend its season. A day later Mitchell tested positive, and he said Gobert did not take the illness seriously and was careless with the way he conducted himself. The following week on ABC, Mitchell said it "took a while for me to kind of cool off" at Gobert.

Their relationship is no longer shattered, according to Lindsey, and they are ready to work together when the season resumes to help Utah continue their playoff push. When the season went on pause, the Jazz were in fourth place in the Western Conference and 1.5 games behind the first-placed Denver Nuggets in the Northwest Division.

"They're ready to put this behind them, move forward, act professionally," Lindsey said.

"We're very pleased with the collective makeup of our group, Donovan and Rudy in particular. We look forward to moving forward."

"We fully expect the team to come together in a great way and continue to move forward as a group," he added. "And I think at the end of the day, Donovan and Rudy – I don't want to speak for them on every matter, they'll speak to themselves, moving forward – but I think at the most basic level, they know they need each other to accomplish the goals that we want to accomplish of being the last team standing in the NBA."

Philadelphia 76ers star Ben Simmons should be ready to play when the NBA season resumes.

Simmons missed eight games due to a nerve impingement in his lower back before the 2019-20 campaign was paused amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The point guard was at that time set to be re-evaluated in three weeks, putting his availability for a late-season playoff push into question.

Sixers general manager Elton Brand now believes he will be able to suit up. 

"I'm very optimistic he'll be able to play, if and when, we're given that green light to resume," Brand said on a conference call on Tuesday.

The NBA leader in steals with 115, Simmons has been allowed to rehab at the 76ers' practice facility and Brand has been encouraged by his progress.

The next step is for Simmons to move on to three-on-three and five-on-five work, but those scrimmages will not be permitted until social distancing restrictions are lifted. 

"I give Ben and our medical staff a ton of credit for their hard work throughout his recovery," Brand said.

"I give Ben so much credit for him working so hard throughout this unknown time. Fortunately, we've able to arrange for him to continue to get the treatment and rehab he needs during this hiatus. 

''When I FaceTime him during his workouts and his treatments and I see him, I'd be highly encouraged." 

A two-time All-Star, the 23-year-old Simmons was in the midst of another excellent season before being sidelined, averaging 16.7 points, 8.2 assists, 7.8 rebounds and 2.1 steals.

He has been instrumental to Philadelphia's success, as the 76ers are 33-21 when Simmons plays and 6-5 when he does not.

The Sixers were tied with the Indiana Pacers for fifth place in the Eastern Conference when the season was shut down, and Simmons' return would be key to a playoff run. 

''We've taken our time, we've been methodical and thoughtful about his recovery and rehab, just to make sure, because we weren't in a rush,'' Brand said.

''It's hard to speculate. He's been working hard and I know he'd be close or ready.'' 

The NBA is very different place to what it was when Stephen Curry came on the scene.

The Golden State Warriors star has been at the forefront in a dramatic shift to the way the game is played.

Gone are the days when physicality was the predominant attribute required to succeed. Now the three-point shot reigns supreme.

Five years on from Curry claiming the first of his two successive MVP awards, we use Stats Perform data to analyse the increasing importance of success from beyond the arc.

 

Deadly from distance

Curry entered the league as the seventh overall pick in the 2009 draft, with Ray Allen proving the benchmark when it came to three-point shooting.

No one has hit more shots from downtown than the two-time NBA champion and 10-time All-Star's 2,973.

Prior to 2012-13, he also held the record for the most three-pointers made per game in a season when he averaged 3.4 in 2005-06. Curry has beaten that mark six times in his eight campaigns since.

The Warriors guard set a new record of 5.1 three-pointers made per game in 2015-16 and, after dipping to the still-impressive averages of 4.1 and 4.2 in the two subsequent seasons, he matched it in 2018-19.

On course for history

Curry has played 699 games in the NBA and has made 2,495 three-pointers. It is close to 700 more than the next best record for successful three-pointers in a player's first 700 games, which is team-mate Klay Thompson's total of 1,798 in 615 appearances.

The most previously was 1,632 by Allen.

A league-wide trend

It's not just Curry, though.

The average number of three-pointers made per game has been a new league record in each of the past eight seasons.

Furthermore, the rate of 24.3 combined three-pointers made per game in the NBA this season is more than twice that from 2005-06 (11.5).

Consistently accurate

In Allen's 2005-06 season he made a record 269 three-pointers – that is now the 11th best total in the all-time list.

Five of the top-10 tallies belong to Curry, including the top two. He set a new benchmark when he made 402 shots from downtown in his MVP season.

James Harden (378 in 2018-19 and 271 in 2019-20), Paul George (292 in 2018-19), Buddy Hield (278 in 2018-19) and Klay Thompson (276 in 2015-16) are the other top-10 entries.

There have been 38 player seasons in NBA history with at least 600 three-point attempts.

Six of those were by Curry and in those 38 the Warriors star's percentages rank first, second, third, fourth, eighth and 11th.

Often prolific

When Curry entered the league the record for the most games with at least eight three-pointers made was held by Allen, who at that point had nine.

Since then Curry has racked up 48 such games, more than twice as many as Houston Rockets guard Harden, who is second on the all-time list with 21.

Only four players had managed to score 11 three-pointers in a game before Curry's emergence, and each of them had only done it once. In his NBA career he has managed to achieve the feat eight times.

Not just the guards

The big men are also getting involved.

Players who are 6ft 8in or taller are attempting more of their shots from three-point range.

From 1979-80 to 1984-85 just 0.2 per cent of their field-goal attempts were from beyond the arc, and that increased to 3.0 in the seasons from 1995-96 until 1999-2000.

The figure since 2015-16 stands at 8.5 per cent.

A new NBA

The upward trend across the league can also be seen when looking at the top scorers in a season.

Before 2013-14, no more than four of the leading 10 players in points-per-game in a given season had attempted more than two three-pointers per game.

Since then, at least five have done so in six of the seven seasons. As things stand in 2019-20, the number is up to an unprecedented seven.

Indeed, there are 18 players in the top 25 for points-per-game this season who have attempted more than two three-pointers.

'The Last Dance' may have emphasised Dennis Rodman's eccentric ways when it showed him partying with Carmen Electra in Las Vegas, yet one of his Chicago Bulls team-mates insists he was actually "very quiet".

The documentary profiling the Bulls' 1997-98 campaign last week detailed the restless Rodman's mid-season trip to Las Vegas, which was sanctioned by head coach Phil Jackson.

Rodman stayed in Sin City with his model girlfriend Carmen Electra longer than the agreed time and it took a visit to their hotel room from Michael Jordan for the trip to end.

Subsequent recollections indicated that Rodman did not miss a beat when he returned to practice, and Rusty LaRue, a role player on that 1997-98 Bulls team, revealed the power forward was completely different once it came time to work.

"He's probably the exact opposite of his persona in the public," LaRue told Stats Perform.

"He's not a flamboyant guy. He was very quiet, a really hard worker, never took plays off in practice.

"When he was there, he practised his tail off and then would actually stay and lift weights after.

"He really didn't say a whole lot, kept to himself, kind of did his thing but was really a hard worker and had a very high basketball IQ.

"He was certainly an asset to that team in a lot of different ways."

LaRue, who was an NBA rookie on that 'Last Dance' team, was promoted to the roster during the season when fellow point guard Steve Kerr got an injury.

While Rodman, Jordan and Scottie Pippen were seen as the key figures in a team that secured a second three-peat, Kerr's basketball acumen has been evident since he went into coaching.

The Golden State Warriors coach has led Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green to three NBA championships in four years recently, which has impressed his old colleague LaRue.

"Steve always was a really cerebral player, obviously, and was a tough competitor," LaRue added.

"You can see how that translates into being a really excellent coach.

"Probably the biggest thing I see on those Warriors teams is he came into a situation where he had a lot of elite players.

"He was able to manage those players and get them to all play together and sacrifice themselves a little bit for the team."

May 4, 2015 was when Stephen Curry's status as a true NBA superstar was confirmed.

Saul 'Canelo' Alvarez was already established as a boxing royalty when, exactly four years later, he added another belt to his collection.

Here we take a look at major sporting events that have occurred on May 4 in previous years.

 

2015: Curry wins first MVP award

The Golden State Warriors' decision to hire Steve Kerr as their head coach prior to the 2014-15 season paid dividends as it transformed point guard Curry into one of the NBA's best.

Curry had only been selected for one All-Star Game before his 2014-15 MVP campaign, when he broke his own record for single-season three-pointers by nailing 286 shots from beyond the arc. 

The first of three NBA championships in four years soon followed as Curry spearheaded a new NBA dynasty.

He would win the MVP award again in 2016 - the season when the Warriors did not lift the Larry O'Brien Trophy - and that time he became the first in NBA history to win the unanimous vote.

2016: Fernando own goal sets up all-Madrid final

It was not pretty but on May 4, 2016, 10-time European Cup winners Real Madrid made another final.

Only one goal separated Los Blancos from Manchester City across 180 minutes, and it came via a degree of fortune - Fernando deflecting Gareth Bale's cross into his own net.

That was enough to see them advance to another final against cross-city rivals Atletico Madrid, with Zinedine Zidane's men going on to win their first of three successive finals in the competition via a penalty shoot-out at San Siro.

 

2019: Canelo seals points win over Jacobs

On Cinco de Mayo weekend, Mexican Alvarez out-pointed Daniel Jacobs to add the IBF middleweight belt to his WBC and WBA titles.

All three judges scored the fight in the Alvarez's favour on his return to the 160lb division, the 28-year-old having briefly stepped up to obliterate Rocky Fielding and take the Liverpudlian's WBA super-middleweight belt.

Alvarez moved to light heavyweight six months later, knocking out Sergey Kovalev in the 11th round to become a four-weight world champion.

Things were looking up for the Chicago Bulls when Derrick Rose was named NBA MVP on May 3, 2011.

At 22 years old, Rose became the youngest player – and only the second for the Bulls after Michael Jordan – to win the award.

However, that proved to be the pinnacle of his fledgling career, as a serious knee injury denied him the chance to maximise his incredible potential.

Using data from Stats Perform, we look at five NBA careers that were ruined by injuries.

 

Derrick Rose

After being drafted first overall by the Bulls in 2008, Rose was tipped as a talent capable of leading them to their first NBA championship since the Jordan era.

He was named Rookie of the Year and earned MVP honours in the 2010-11 season after averaging 25 points, 7.7 assists and 4.1 rebounds per game.

Rose led the Bulls to the Eastern Conference Finals against the Miami Heat that year, but they were unable to deny LeBron James a first appearance in the NBA Finals and lost in five games.

However, an ACL tear in the first round of the playoffs the following season proved to be the first in a string of knee injuries that derailed what looked set to be a Hall of Fame career.

Rose's production has dropped across the board since that blow against the Philadelphia 76ers, the most notable of which is his points per game dipping from 21 beforehand to 16.8.

He managed 46 double-doubles and 41 30-point games prior to the start of the 2012-13 season, but since then he has managed just 12 and 15 respectively.

 

Penny Hardaway

Shaquille O'Neal encouraged the Orlando Magic to trade 1993 first overall draft pick Chris Webber to the Golden State Warriors for Hardaway and the pair quickly developed a formidable partnership that made the team championship contenders.

The Magic went all the way to the NBA Finals in 1995 but the youthful team were swept by the more experienced Houston Rockets and, after they lost to Jordan's Bulls in the 1996 Eastern Conference Finals, O'Neal left for the Los Angeles Lakers.

Hardaway appeared ready to become the leading man in Orlando but a knee injury sustained in December 1997 forced him to miss much of the remainder of the campaign.

He went from averaging 19.7 points and 6.3 assists per game to just 11.5 and 3.8 respectively.

Over half of the four-time All-Star's 313 games played prior to his injury saw him score 20 points or more. In his 391 appearances afterwards that ratio slipped to just 14.8 per cent.

 

Grant Hill

Two-time NCAA champion Hill entered the NBA surrounded by plenty of hype and he quickly established himself as a force in the league after being taken third overall by the Detroit Pistons in 1994.

He joined a select group of players to make the All-Star Game in their debut season and no one else in the league had as many votes as him – he ended up sharing Rookie of the Year honours with Jason Kidd.

Hill was a five-time All-Star and was the headline name heading into free agency in 2000, but he sustained a broken ankle – which he claims was mismanaged by the Pistons – during a first-round playoff game against the Heat and it altered the trajectory of his career.

The small forward landed with the Magic but was unable to continue delivering at his previous rates – his averages for points per game and assists per game fell from 21.6 and 6.3 to 13.1 and 2.6.

Hill managed just 31 double-doubles in the remaining 591 games of his career – just under a fifth of the amount he had accumulated in his first 435 appearances in the league.

His field-goal percentage may have increased from 47.6 per cent to 49.2 per cent, but just five of the 71 30-point games in his career came after his ankle injury.

 

Brandon Roy

Just one vote stopped Roy being a unanimous decision as Rookie of the Year in 2007, having averaged 16.8 points, 4.4 rebounds and 4.0 assists per game during his first regular season with the Portland Trail Blazers.

He earned a four-year, maximum-salary contract in August 2009 and made his third All-Star appearance that season, but following surgery on a meniscus tear in his right knee – he had also previously had a procedure for a cartilage issue in his left knee – in April 2010 his career went south.

Roy, who had an operation on both knees in January 2011, would only play 52 more games in the NBA, five of which came in a bid to return from retirement with the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 2012-13 season.

In that period his points, assists and rebounds per game almost halved (points: 20.2 to 11.6, assists: 5.0 to 2.9, rebounds: 4.6 to 2.6).

Roy managed just one more double-double and 10 20-point games, having had 18 and 153 prior to the start of the 2010-11 season.

 

Tracy McGrady

The Rockets could have been championship contenders had McGrady and Yao Ming not both proved so injury-prone during their six years together on the team.

Despite an impressive start to life with the Rockets in 2004-05, back spasms sidelined McGrady for extended spells in the following two seasons.

The seven-time All-Star had painkilling injections to help ease knee and shoulder ailments ahead of the 2007-08 playoffs, but for the second straight season he was unable to guide Houston past the Utah Jazz in the first round.

McGrady's production fell off a cliff from the start of the following campaign. From scoring an impressive 22.4 points per game he slipped to just 8.7 – he only had one more 30-point game in the rest of his career, having had 205 beforehand.

As his career petered out at the New York Knicks, Pistons, Atlanta Hawks and San Antonio Spurs – a short stint with the latter coming after a spell in China – McGrady went from a ratio of scoring 20 points every other game to doing so once in every 10 appearances.

However, he still earned a spot in the Hall of Fame.

Jose Mourinho will have mixed memories about May 3 down the years.

The Portuguese endured European disappointment with Chelsea and Real Madrid on this date during his coaching career, but also clinched domestic success in his second stint with the Blues.

Derrick Rose would also be forgiven for having bittersweet feelings, considering it marks the anniversary of a personal milestone achieved before injury issues struck.

Take a look back at some of the momentous moments in sport that have occurred previously on this day.

 

2005: 'Ghost' goal sends Liverpool through

Did it cross the line? Luis Garcia certainly thought so after prodding the ball towards the Chelsea goal in the second leg of their all-English Champions League semi-final with Liverpool.

After a 0-0 scoreline at Stamford Bridge, the Spaniard seized on a loose ball in the fourth minute at Anfield after Milan Baros had collided with visiting goalkeeper Petr Cech.

William Gallas' clearance led Chelsea to believe they had escaped, but the goal was given. The Reds stood firm for the remainder of an absorbing contest as Mourinho's Premier League champions suffered an agonising defeat by the barest of margins.

"The linesman scored the goal. No one knows if that shot went over the line and you must be 100 per cent," Mourinho said afterwards. Liverpool, of course, went on to lift the trophy, beating Milan on an unforgettable night in Istanbul.

2011: Rose follows in Jordan's footsteps

Drafted first by his hometown Chicago Bulls, Rose ended his third season in the NBA by being crowned the league's MVP at 22.

The point guard averaged 25 points, 7.7 assists and 4.1 rebounds to become the youngest player to receive the honour, finishing comfortably ahead of Dwight Howard in the voting. 

He became just the second Bulls player to be named MVP, following in the footsteps of the legendary Michael Jordan. Chicago finished with a 62-20 regular season record and went on to lose to LeBron James and the Miami Heat in the Eastern Conference Finals.

The following campaign, after signing a lucrative contract extension, Rose suffered a torn ACL in his left knee during the playoffs. He was sidelined for over a year.

2011: Barca book Wembley trip

More European misery for Mourinho, as this time his Real Madrid side missed out on the Champions League final. To make matters worse, it was arch-rivals Barcelona who denied them.

The Catalan side had won 2-0 in a feisty first meeting in the Spanish capital, giving them breathing space ahead of the return at Camp Nou. Gonzalo Higuain had a goal ruled out for Madrid before the hosts extended their advantage, Pedro providing the finish.

Marcelo equalised in the second half but Mourinho - serving a suspension after being sent off in the opening leg for complaining about a red card shown to Pepe - still saw his side exit 3-1 on aggregate. 

2015: Hazard helps Blues cruise over the line

Better times for Jose in 2015, then. Back in charge at the Bridge, he steered Chelsea to Premier League glory again, this time with three games to spare.

A 1-0 triumph over Crystal Palace was enough to be confirmed as champions, Eden Hazard heading in the rebound after his penalty had been saved by Julian Speroni to grab the only goal of the contest shortly before half-time.

"Finally we can breathe, relax and enjoy," a jaded Mourinho said in the aftermath, having also clinched the EFL Cup earlier in the campaign.

Still, he did not have to wait long for a break. Following a disastrous start to their title defence, Chelsea sacked him, bringing in Guus Hiddink as interim boss.

The NBA has indefinitely suspended its annual draft lottery and pre-draft scouting combine due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to multiple media reports.  

Both events were originally scheduled to take place in Chicago in May.

The decision came from a conference call with the league's board of governors, who voted to postpone the lottery and combine but delayed deciding on the draft itself, which is scheduled for June 25.  

The group also discussed the possibility of moving the start of the 2020-21 season back to December, according to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski. While the discussions were not definitive, pushing back the league calendar may increase the chance for games to be played with fans inside arenas.

The news comes at a key time for the league, with some agents and team personnel reportedly calling for the remainder of the 2019-20 season to be cancelled. LeBron James, however, spoke out in support of finishing the campaign on Twitter on Thursday.

The scouting combine typically involves about 70 players – along with front office personnel, doctors and members of the media – gathering to run drills, play games against one another and receive medical examinations.  

The NBA was the first major sports league in the United States to suspend play because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and no games have taken place since March 11. The league has missed 259 regular season games during the shutdown. 

LeBron James does not buy into the rumours that the NBA may be forced to cancel its 2019-20 season because of the coronavirus pandemic.  

The NBA was suspended indefinitely in March and in a post on Twitter on Thursday Los Angeles Lakers superstar James appeared to rebuke a CNBC story.

The report cited concerns from anonymous agents and team executives about the financial viability of a return this season, especially without fans in arenas.  

James posted: "Saw some reports about execs and agents wanting to cancel season??? That's absolutely not true. Nobody I know [is] saying anything like that.

"As soon as it's safe we would like to finish our season. I'm ready and our team is ready. Nobody should be cancelling anything."

Speculation about the possible completion of the NBA season has been inconclusive, even seven weeks after the league went on indefinite hiatus due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr told the San Francisco Chronicle earlier this week that his team, out of playoff contention, is assuming the regular season is over.  

The league office has yet to make any such declarations, however, and an NBA spokesperson confirmed seeing out the campaign remains on the agenda.

"While our top priority remains everyone's health and well-being, we continue to evaluate all options to finish this season," they said. "At the same time, we are intensely focused on addressing the potential impact of COVID-19 on the 2020-21 season."

James' Lakers had the best record in the Western Conference at 49-14 when the NBA was suspended.

Four-time MVP James, 35, is looking for his fourth championship.  

The New York Knicks are bringing back general manager Scott Perry, as the two sides agreed to a one-year deal on Wednesday. 

Perry was hired as general manager of the Knicks in July 2017, running the team's basketball operations after Steve Mills was fired as president this past February. 

The Knicks and Perry had a mutual option on his contract that needed to be decided by May 1, and there was concern that he would not be retained because of the front-office overhaul and with the franchise having compiled the NBA's second-worst record since he took over as GM.

However, Leon Rose, who was hired as Mills' replacement shortly before the NBA was put on pause because of the coronavirus outbreak in early March, believes Perry is the right man to help turn the franchise around. 

"Scott is a well-respected basketball executive who I have known for more than 20 years," Rose said in a statement.

"I look forward to continuing to work closely with him as we look to build a winning team in New York."  

When the season was halted in March, the Knicks were 21-45 and in last place in the Atlantic Division. New York has not made the playoffs since 2013. 

The NCAA has announced that its board of governors is in favour of a rule change that would allow athletes to receive compensation for endorsements as well as opportunities involving social media platforms and personal appearances. 

It is a step the NCAA had been moving towards after a number of states passed legislation that would prohibit its member institutions from denying athletes the opportunity to use their name, image or likeness to earn income.

The proposal is based off recommendations made by the Federal and State Legislation Working Group panel the NCAA created last year. 

"Throughout our efforts to enhance support for college athletes, the NCAA has relied upon considerable feedback from and the engagement of our members, including numerous student-athletes, from all three divisions," said board chairperson and Ohio State president Michael Drake.

"Allowing promotions and third-party endorsements is uncharted territory." 

The changes would go into effect beginning with the 2021-22 academic year if approved, with a formal vote scheduled to take place at the next NCAA convention in January. 

The working group said it will put several guardrails into place to ensure a level playing field.

Athletes will be prohibited from using their image and likeness for recruiting purposes and any compensation earned by an athlete must be separate from his or her school or conference. 

"As we evolve, the Association will continue to identify the guardrails to further support student-athletes within the context of college sports and higher education," said Big East commissioner and working group co-chair Val Ackerman. 

The NCAA said it still will seek federal legislation that would ban individual states from enacting their own laws regarding athlete compensation. 

"The evolving legal and legislative landscape around these issues not only could undermine college sports as a part of higher education but also significantly limit the NCAA's ability to meet the needs of college athletes moving forward," Drake said.

"We must continue to engage with Congress in order to secure the appropriate legal and legislative framework to modernize our rules around name, image and likeness.

"We will do so in a way that underscores the Association's mission to oversee and protect college athletics and college athletes on a national scale."

While the NBA is hoping it will be able to resume the 2019-20 season that was put on pause because of the coronavirus pandemic, Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr is in no rush to return and is already looking ahead to the 2020-21 season.

The NBA season was suspended last month due to COVID-19, which has killed more than 217,800 people worldwide.

"It feels like the offseason," Kerr said during a Zoom conference call on Tuesday.

"And in fact we had a Zoom call, [Warriors general manager] Bob Myers and I got on a Zoom with our players, our whole roster last week. And it was just a chance to check in, but it was also a chance for Bob to update the players on his contact with the league and the latest news, but it also kind of felt like our annual team exit meeting.

"Our coaching staff and I have been undergoing staff evaluations, offseason plans, so we are absolutely in offseason mode right now."

Speaking along with Warriors president and chief operating officer Rick Welts and University of San Francisco women's basketball coach Jennifer Azzi as part of a virtual town hall, Kerr said that with Golden State sitting at 15-50 and at the bottom of the Western Conference it is tough for his team to be motivated to want to come back and play when they are out of the playoff picture.

"The suspension came at an interesting time and it really made a difference, depending on where your team stood in the standings," he said.

"So I've talked to some of my fellow coaches who are coaching teams that are right in the thick of the playoff hunt. They're trying desperately to stay in touch with their team, some of them are even doing group workouts on Zoom with their training staff, and they're trying to find hoops for their players to shoot at where they're able to do so.

"It's different for us because we were down to 17 games, but we were out of the playoffs. It feels like the end of the season for our team. It just does."

The NBA has considered resuming the regular season with teams playing games in isolation without fans, which would ultimately lead to a unique situation for a Warriors team with nothing to play for if their players are forced to play essentially scrimmages in empty gyms. 

"We don't know anything officially," Kerr said. "There's still a chance the league could ask us to come back and play some games, but given what we went through this season with all the injuries and the tough record, it's been more of the case of we're staying in touch with guys but everybody is just sort of assuming that this is kind of it. We're not going to be involved much anymore."

Rafael Nadal is worried about his tennis future due to the extended break caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The ATP Tour has been suspended until at least July 13 due to the COVID-19 crisis, which has killed more than 211,600 people globally.

Nadal – who reached the Australian Open quarter-finals this year – last took to the court when he won the Mexican Open in February and the 19-time grand slam champion is concerned.

"Personally, there is a worry because when you pause your body in a drastic way it can be difficult to restart it," the 33-year-old said via Marca, as he spoke with Spanish basketball star Pau Gasol.

"I'm positive and I hope to recover and return well, but there's a big risk."

Former Los Angeles Lakers star and two-time NBA champion Gasol, 39, shared similar concerns.

Gasol suffered a season-ending foot injury during the 2018-19 campaign and has not played since, waived by the Portland Trail Blazers in November.

"I have a few years more on my body than him," said Gasol, who is still eyeing the 2021 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

"I've not played for a year and two months because of my injury and my plan was to try to be ready for the Olympic Games in Tokyo.

"But this has changed and there's a lot of uncertainty. I can just focus on the daily recovery work. This pause will have an effect, whether big or small. It'll be tough."

As some parts of the United States begin to peel back some of their shelter-in-place orders amid the coronavirus pandemic, the NBA has targeted no earlier than May 8 for teams to open their practice facilities. 

The league sent a memo to teams on Monday outlining plans for them to open their complexes in safe and controlled environments. 

According to the stipulations set by the league, only four players would be permitted at a facility at a time, no coaches would be allowed participate and no kind of practices or scrimmages could be held. Players also remain prohibited from using non-team facilities. 

These rule changes also only pertain to those franchises that reside in a city rescinding its stay-at-home orders. For those teams in cities that still have social-distancing restrictions in place, the league said it will work with the club to develop an alternative.  

While the league pegged May 8 as a possible date for facilities to open, that date could be pushed back depending on the COVID-19 outlook.

Before the league contacted teams, Atlanta Hawks general manager Travis Schlenk said earlier  onMonday he had no plans to open the team’s complex  onFriday, the first day it was being reported that the NBA could open some facilities. 

The state of Georgia is loosening some of its restrictions, but Schlenk would prefer to see how things play out.

“We currently have no plans to open our facility on Friday,” Schlenk said. “Obviously the state is going to start opening up, but let’s see what happens before we open up. The last thing you want to do is have the state open up and have a second wave come through, so we’re going to see how the state reacts to being open first before we make any decisions about our facility.” 

One of Manchester United's great modern strikers was finally presented at Old Trafford on this day 19 years ago, after he had seen his move put off by a year following injury woes.

Myles Garrett and Mitch Trubisky were two of the big movers in the NFL Draft back in 2017, although the latter has not enjoyed much success.

Going back much further, there was a notable retirement from heavyweight boxing and a major arrival at the Boston Celtics that heralded a triumphant era.

Here are some of the big sporting moments to happen on April 27.

 

1950 - Auerbach hired by Celtics

Arnold 'Red' Auerbach became Boston Celtics coach on this day in 1950 after three years with the Washington Capitols.

A reported $10,000 investment in his services yielded a 39-30 record and a first playoff appearance in his maiden season in the job, but the Celtics had to be patient before they found tangible success.

The first NBA Championship came in 1957, with a victory over the St Louis Hawks, and a true dynasty would follow. Under 'Red', the Celtics won a further eight titles until 1966, when Auerbach moved into a general manager role.

 

1956 - Rocky Marciano retires

April 27 saw Rocky Marciano bow out of heavyweight boxing with a perfect record of 49 wins from as many professional bouts, 43 of which were knockouts.

Having apparently taken to boxing during a three-year career in the military, Marciano won his first professional fight on March 17, 1947 against Lee Epperson.

The 'Brockton Blockbuster' became heavyweight champion by knocking out Jersey Joe Walcott in September 1952 and defended the title five times, the last in September 1955.

 

2001 - Van Nistelrooy presented as a Manchester United player

United were due to sign Van Nistelrooy in 2000 but a problem was detected during his medical and he ruptured knee ligaments when he returned to training with PSV.

Alex Ferguson was prepared to play the long game, though, and Van Nistelrooy was at last shown off to the UK media as a United player the following year after signing for around £18.5million.

The Netherlands striker went on to become one of the Red Devils' most lethal modern centre-forwards, scoring 150 goals in 219 appearances. He won the Premier League, the FA Cup and EFL Cup before moving to Real Madrid in 2006, but he really deserved more medals from his five years in England.

 

2017 - Myles Garrett drafted first overall

This date three years ago saw Myles Garrett drafted first overall by the Cleveland Browns, with Patrick Mahomes picked up by the Kansas City Chiefs.

While Garrett made the 2018 Pro Bowl and Mahomes was named MVP as the Chiefs won last year's Super Bowl, things have not gone so well for Mitch Trubisky.

Drafted second overall by the Chicago Bears on the same day, the Bears are now reportedly prepared not to take up the quarterback's fifth-year option, having acquired Nick Foles.

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