There will be no fans present at PGA Tour events for the rest of the current season due to the coronavirus crisis.

The PGA Tour confirmed on Monday they had made the decision impacting the remaining events on the 2019-20 schedule "out of an abundance of caution".

"As we have said from the start, our number one priority remains the health and safety of everyone in the communities where we are invited guests each week," said PGA Tour Chief Tournaments and Competitions Officer Andy Pazder.

This week's Memorial tournament in Ohio, which will involve Tiger Woods, was supposed to be the first event with spectators present, but those plans were scrapped earlier this month.

It will now be played behind closed doors, as was the case with the five events played since the Tour's resumption in June.

The US PGA Championship major and the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational have also been among the tournaments to announce they will take place without spectators present.

As a result of the Tour’s latest update, no fans will be able to attend events like the Wyndham Championship and the trio of tournaments in the FedExCup playoffs.

The 2020-21 season will begin with the Safeway Open in California on September 10.

No decisions have been reached on events from then on, with the rescheduled Masters and U.S. Open, which are run independently and fall into next season's calendar, yet to decide on fan attendance.

Collin Morikawa overcame Justin Thomas in a play-off to win the Workday Charity Open, his second title on the PGA Tour.

In just his 24th start as a professional, Morikawa capitalised on a late collapse by Thomas to join his fellow American in a share for top spot after 72 holes – the pair locked together at 19 under par.

There was nothing to split them when they twice played the 18th again, both managing an opening birdie before Thomas missed a putt for victory.

Having moved to the 10th, Thomas quickly found trouble off the tee and, forced to pitch out, handed the advantage to his rival. Morikawa duly seized the opportunity, collecting the par he needed to prevail at the third extra hole.

Former world number one Thomas had held a two-shot lead overnight having produced three bogey-free rounds at Muirfield Village.

While Thomas dropped shots at the second and third in a shaky start to his Sunday, a run of four birdies around the turn had the world number five back on track for victory.

An eagle at the 15th pushed Thomas three clear, yet he bogeyed two of his final three holes to sign for a score of 69, only enough to tie with Morikawa after the 23-year-old had risen up the leaderboard with his 66.

Viktor Hovland (71) finished alone on 15 under, his hopes for a late charge dashed by a one-over back nine, with Chase Seiffert (67) was a further shot back.

Marc Warren landed his fourth European Tour title and first in six years when he held his nerve on the final day of the Austrian Open.

The 39-year-old Scot had to go to qualifying school to win back his tour card in 2018 after results tailed off, and there have been slim pickings ever since, with Warren failing to achieve a top-20 finish in the past 18 months and falling to 1,258th in the world rankings.

He was co-leader overnight in Austria with German player Nicolai von Dellingshausen, and a roller coaster two-under-par 70 saw Warren reach a winning 13-under total. Four bogeys were countered by six birdies, including two crucial gains at the 15th and 17th holes.

Once a World Cup winner for Scotland alongside Colin Montgomerie, Warren picks up 76,823 euros (£67,500) for his success at this co-sanctioned European Tour and Challenge Tour event - the first tournament for both tours since golf was suspended in March because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Von Dellingshausen slumped to a dispiriting four-over 76 and trailed home in a tie for 15th, with his German compatriot Marcel Schneider taking second place, a shot behind Warren.

Schneider was the most consistent player in the field at Diamond Country Club, shooting scores of 69 each day and dropping only four shots throughout the tournament.

Wil Besseling of the Netherlands snagged third on 11 under after a snappy closing 66, which saw him reach the turn in just 31 shots.

Spain's Sebastian Garcia Rodriguez went to the short 18th with a shot at the title, playing alongside Warren and Von Dellingshausen, but rather than hole the birdie that would have forced a play-off, a double-bogey five saw him sink to a share of fourth.

Warren's countrymen Craig Howie and Connor Syme, and Dutchman Darius van Driel, joined Garcia Rodriguez on 10 under.

Miguel Angel Jimenez, the 56-year-old charismatic Spaniard, saw his title hopes go up in smoke on Saturday, having led through 36 holes.

A 77 from Jimenez knocked him down the leaderboard, but a closing 70 on Sunday allowed him to nudge up into a share of eighth place.

Justin Thomas will take a two-shot lead into the final round of the Workday Charity Open after carding another six-under 66 on Saturday.

The world number five has posted rounds of 68, 66 and 66 at Muirfield Village, moving to 16 under and into a two-stroke lead in Dublin, Ohio.

Thomas, the 2017 US PGA Championship winner, is yet to make a bogey at the PGA Tour event, as he searches for his second victory of the year.

The American made three straight birdies beginning at the fifth, before also picking up shots at 11, 14 and 15.

Thomas is two shots clear of Viktor Hovland, the 22-year-old Norwegian also posting a 66 as he mixed eight birdies with two bogeys.

Overnight leader Collin Morikawa could only manage an even-par 72 to be three shots adrift of Thomas.

Morikawa is outright third after a rollercoaster round, mixing four birdies with four bogeys to sit at 13 under.

Sam Burns (70) and Kevin Streelman (71) are tied for fourth at 11 under, a shot ahead of Ian Poulter (69) and Rory Sabbatini (69).

Rickie Fowler carded an impressive 66 to climb into nine under and a tie for eighth, alongside Gary Woodland (66), Chase Seiffert (70), Hideki Matsuyama (72) and MJ Daffue (65).

Marc Warren and Nicolai von Dellingshausen are tied for the lead heading into the final day of the Austrian Open.

The duo are 11 under par after each carded a 70 for a third round played in heavy rain in Atzenbrugg.

Von Dellingshausen set the clubhouse target after finishing two under for the day thanks to four birdies, and the German was pleased with his form in tricky conditions.

"I was a little bit surprised," said the 27-year-old, who is seeking a first European Tour title. "I find it difficult to play in the rain, probably more so than others do, but I had a really good start to the round. [I] hit some consistent, solid shots and holed some putts, so it went fairly fast. It was difficult out there and I knew there would be some trouble during the round, but I was solid.

"It [the course] was playing completely different to the days before. No roll basically, long irons into the greens where we had been hitting wedges in, so considering the rain today, I was quite happy when I was somewhere close to the hole and could make those putts."

Warren was equally content with his play for the day given Friday's second round was played in temperatures pushing 35 degrees Celsius.

"Probably as wet coming off today as I was yesterday, but with water today instead of sweat," said Warren, whose last of three European Tour wins came in 2014.

"I know what to expect. Some guys haven't won before, they might not know what to expect. I'm pretty comfortable with the situation I'm in. Hopefully a good front nine tomorrow and I'll be in with a chance to win."

Warren's fellow Scot, Connor Syme, is tied at 10 under along with Darius van Driel and Sebastian Garcia Rodriguez, with Joost Luiten, Joel Stalter and Marcel Schneider a stroke further back.

Overnight leader Miguel Angel Jimenez is in a share of 12th place on six under, with double bogeys at the ninth and 10th holes leading to a disappointing third-round score of 77.

Collin Morikawa opened up a three-stroke lead at the Workday Charity Open, while Jordan Spieth is likely to miss the cut as the second round was suspended.

Morikawa continued his consistent start at Muirfield Village on Friday, carding a six-under 66 to get to 13 under.

But dangerous weather meant the second round was delayed twice before being suspended due to darkness.

Morikawa is three shots clear of fellow Americans Kevin Streelman (64) and Justin Thomas (66).

After an opening-round 65, Morikawa struggled on his front nine before making six birdies on his final eight holes.

Streelman holed nine birdies during his impressive round, while Thomas is in contention after a bogey-free round.

There were 33 players unable to complete their second rounds, with Rory Sabbatini – who is at eight under and through 17 – the best-placed of those, sitting in a tie for sixth.

Spieth, a three-time major champion, is in danger of missing the cut after a second straight even-par 72, with the projected cut at two under.

Brooks Koepka is also set to miss the cut, the world number six shooting a 69 to be at one under.

Sitting a shot behind Streelman and Thomas in a tie for fourth are Hideki Matsuyama (68) and Sam Burns (66), while Viktor Hovland (67) is at eight under alongside Sabbatini.

Englishman Ian Poulter (69) and Chase Seiffert (69) are at seven under.

Miguel Angel Jimenez recorded his lowest round on the European Tour for two years to take the lead in the Austrian Open.

The 56-year-old carded a seven-under-par 65 on Friday in Atzenbrugg, his lowest score since the 2018 Italian Open, to take a two-shot lead into the weekend over a chasing group including overnight leader Joost Luiten.

Jimenez birdied three of his opening four holes and three of the final four on the front nine after dropping a shot at the par-four fifth.

Further gains followed on the 10th, 11th and 13th holes, and the frustration of back-to-back bogeys was eased when he gained a further stroke on the par-three 18th with a superb approach.

After spending a four-month break in the Dominican Republic while the coronavirus pandemic kept the Tour on hold, Jimenez was delighted to be back and on form as he targets a title that would see him break his own record as the oldest winner in European Tour history.

"I'm playing very well," he said on Friday. "It feels great. Four months without competing, it's nice getting back into a tournament and feeling the tension again. I'm hitting it well and making some putts, not too many bogeys – that's the key. I enjoyed myself. My irons were working very well.

"I was excited to get back. I miss the competition. I can't remember the last time I had a four-month holiday."

Luiten went to nine under for the tournament to claim a share of second with Marc Warren, Craig Howie, Renato Paratore and Nicolai Von Dellingshausen.

Patrick Reed is in full support of the decision taken to delay the Ryder Cup, insisting the presence of fans will make it "even sweeter" when the event takes place in 2021.

Due to the ongoing impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Ryder Cup organisers announced this week that the 2020 edition will be pushed back 12 months.

The United States will have home advantage next September when Europe travels to defend the trophy at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin, with the action unfolding between September 24-26.

While the PGA Tour has returned behind closed doors, Reed believes the Ryder Cup would not be the same if played out without a packed crowd at the course, as their presence brings out the emotion in the players.

The 29-year-old has experienced both sides of the occasion, too. He has lost twice on European soil, including in 2018 at Le Golf National, but was also a member of the USA team that triumphed in 2016 under the captaincy of Davis Love III.

Speaking after his opening round at the Workday Charity Open, Reed said: "I think probably if you asked everybody - captains, assistant captains, players, both organisations - that they're disappointed, obviously, that we're not going to play Ryder Cup this year, but at the end of the day I feel like they made the right call.

"The Ryder Cup is not the same if you have it at 50 per cent fans or if you have it at no fans. The fans are kind of what makes the Ryder Cup.

"You go in there and you - if you're the home team, you have everyone behind you, and if you're away, you want the hostility, you want people to kind of go at you. That's the fun thing about the event.

"So with either cutting fans back or not having them at all, I also don't think you'll get as much emotion out of players, and with that being said, I feel like it just wouldn't be a Ryder Cup.

"I mean, they made the right decision, and it's just going to be even sweeter whenever we're able to play next year."

The Ryder Cup will continue to take place in odd-numbers years in the future, with the 2023 tournament to be held in Italy.

Collin Morikawa edged into a one-stroke lead at the Workday Charity Open, while Jordan Spieth struggled during the opening round on Thursday.

Morikawa carded a seven-under 65 at Muirfield Village to hold a narrow advantage over Adam Hadwin.

A one-time PGA Tour winner, Morikawa made an eagle and six birdies before dropping a shot at the last hole.

After a top-10 finish at the Charles Schwab Challenge, former world number one Spieth has struggled in two events since and opened with an even-par 72.

The three-time major champion was three over through 13 holes before a birdie at 14 and an eagle at the par-five 15th saw him sit in a tie for 64th.

Hideki Matsuyama, Zach Johnson, Nick Taylor and Aaron Wise made brighter starts, shooting five-under 67s to be tied for third.

Justin Thomas, the world number five, is a shot further back in a group of 11 players who carded 68s.

Thomas recorded top-10 finishes at the Charles Schwab Challenge and RBC Heritage before missing the cut at the Travelers Championship, but the American is back in contention.

Pat Perez, Louis Oosthuizen, Tim Wilkinson, Peter Malnati, Patrick Reed, Ian Poulter, Adam Long, Graeme McDowell, Roger Sloan and Chase Seiffert are alongside Thomas at four under.

Brooks Koepka, meanwhile, battled to a two-over 74.

The European Tour got back under way amid the coronavirus pandemic on Thursday with the Austrian Open, where Joost Luiten claimed a first-round lead.

Golf was halted due to the global crisis, but after the PGA Tour's return last month, the European Tour and Challenge Tour followed suit in Atzenbrugg.

Six-time Tour winner Luiten was fastest out the blocks as he secured a one-stroke advantage at the end of the first day's play.

The Dutchman went round in 65 with a birdie-birdie finish taking him to seven under par after just a single bogey.

"I think a lot of the guys didn't know where we stood really with our game," Luiten said afterwards. "It's good to have a fast start and bring in a good score."

Scottish pair Craig Howie - who went bogey-free - and Marc Warren provided Luiten's closest competition at six under, while a further four players were back on five under.

Tiger Woods will compete on the PGA Tour for the first time in five months after committing to play the Memorial Tournament next week.

Woods has won the Memorial Tournament five times and will be hoping to clinch a record-breaking 83rd PGA Tour victory when he competes at Muirfield Village, having tied Sam Snead's all-time best mark at the Zozo Championship back in October.

"I'm looking forward to playing in the @MemorialGolf next week," the 15-time major champion posted on Twitter.

"I've missed going out and competing with the guys and can't wait to get back out there."

Woods has not featured on the tour since the Genesis Invitiational in February, with golf put on hold for three months during the coronavirus pandemic.

However, the 44-year-old was in action in May, teaming up with Peyton Manning and beating Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady in The Match: Champions for Charity. The event helped raise over $20million to help with COVID-19 relief.

In addition to his five tournament wins, Woods has also finished in the top 10 a further four times – most recently in 2019 – and enjoyed Presidents Cup success at Muirfield Village.

The postponed Ryder Cup must take place in 2021 at Whistling Straits or it will be cancelled altogether, the CEO of the PGA Seth Waugh has said.

It was confirmed on Wednesday that the United States and defending champions Europe will not compete in the prestigious event this September as planned.

Players had expressed reservations about playing the 43rd edition of the competition without fans present and the lingering impact of the coronavirus pandemic forced the hands of the PGA and European Tour.

However, if circumstances next year mean the Ryder Cup cannot take place in front of spectators on the new dates of September 21-26, then the likelihood is it will scrapped altogether.

Asked what guarantees there were that it can be staged as normal next year, Waugh told reporters: "None, frankly.

"We think that this is the right thing to do. I would bet on science is what I would say, personally, about the ability to figure out treatments, vacancies or protocols or safety given we have 15 months to do that.

"But there frankly is no guarantee. I certainly wouldn't have thought on March 1 - certainly January 1 - that we'd be having this conversation right now.

"I think this is the best possible decision. Frankly if we do get to this time next year and we can't responsibly hold it, it likely will result in a cancellation at that point.

"I don't think we can perpetually roll things forward, that's not fair to the game, that's not fair to the Presidents Cup or anyone else. We're hopeful that we will hold it but all bets are off in terms of what's going on in the world.

"If I were a betting man, I would bet on science to figure out how to truly reopen the world in 15 months' time."

Waugh said he spoke to American captain Steve Stricker and Europe skipper Padraig Harrington on Tuesday evening and feels the decision has their backing.

"I think they were relieved, happy," he added.

"Steve, on his side, absolutely wants to have it – obviously it's a home game for him, in Wisconsin, he wants to have it in the way he's always dreamed of and it wasn't going to look like that.

"Padraig, I think, different perspective, he's just worried about the safety of everybody travelling here and how difficult that would be.

"I think they're disappointed that we're not able to do it because they build their tempos and those that are qualifying are excited about it, but I think there's relief in the certainty of knowing where we stand."

Jon Rahm declared it to be the "smart choice" to delay the 2020 Ryder Cup, insisting the event would simply not be the same if fans were not able to attend.

Whistling Straits in Wisconsin was due to host this year's battle between the United States and Europe in September, but the continued impact of the coronavirus pandemic has led to a change in the schedule.

Instead, the next Ryder Cup will take place between September 24-26 in 2021, a move Rahm fully endorses as it will allow spectators to be present at the course.

The Spaniard made his debut in the competition two years ago, securing a point from his three matches as the European team regained the trophy at Le Golf National in France.

"I mean, I'm not shocked," Rahm told the media ahead of playing in this week's Workday Charity Open on the PGA Tour.

"I know a lot of people probably wanted to watch the Ryder Cup, but the Ryder Cup is not the Ryder Cup without spectators.  

"Right now, it doesn't seem like there's a legitimate way to make it safe for everybody, so I think it's the smart choice."

Rahm also outlined the importance of the Ryder Cup is in terms of growing the sport of golf, even if that means having to wait a little longer to experience it again.

"At the end of the day, the Ryder Cup is one of the most viewed events, sporting events in the world, so it's something that brings a lot of attention for the game of golf," he added.

"It's something that grows the game of golf throughout the world. I think it's important that it's done and it's performed and we play the way the Ryder Cup is supposed to be.  

"I'm sad we're not playing this year because I really wanted to play and I think it would have been cool to go from a U.S. Open to a Ryder Cup, but at the same time, it needs to be run the way it's supposed to be run.  

"I think it's a good decision to change it to next year."

The delay has led to a change in the long-term schedule, as the Ryder Cup will take place moving forwards in odd-numbers years. Therefore, the next staging on European soil will be in 2023.

There is also a change to the Presidents Cup, with the 2021 edition at Quail Hollow pushed back to September 2022.

The Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits has been rescheduled to take place in 2021, organisers have confirmed, with the Presidents Cup moving to 2022.

Doubts have persisted about the feasibility of staging the Ryder Cup since the outbreak of coronavirus and on Wednesday a decision was finally taken to push it back a year. 

In a statement, organisers confirmed that the decision "was based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and in conjunction with the state of Wisconsin and Sheboygan County, with the health and well-being of all involved as the top priority". 

Playing the event without fans had been mooted as an option, but instead it is now set to be held on September 21-26 next year with crowds present. 

The knock-on effect means the next edition of the competition in Europe, when Italy plays host, will move back to 2023 as it retains its biennial scheduling. 

The Presidents Cup, which was due to start on September 30 next year at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, will now move to September 19-25, 2022. 

Next year's Wells Fargo Championship will return to Quail Hollow Club but move to TPC Potomac for 2022 to accommodate the Presidents Cup. 

"Unlike other major sporting events that are played in existing stadiums, we had to make a decision now about building facilities to host the 2020 Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits," said PGA of America CEO Seth Waugh.

"It became clear that as of today, our medical experts and the public authorities in Wisconsin could not give us certainty that conducting an event responsibly with thousands of spectators in September would be possible.

"Given that uncertainty, we knew rescheduling was the right call. As disappointing as this is, our mandate to do all we can to safeguard public health is what matters most.

"The spectators who support both the U.S. and European sides are what make the Ryder Cup such a unique and compelling event and playing without them was not a realistic option."

PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan said: "With the uncertainty of the current climate, we fully support the Ryder Cup's decision to delay a year in order to ensure fans could be a part of the incredible atmosphere in Wisconsin.

"And the delay of next year's Presidents Cup was the right decision in order to allow for that option." 

US Team captain Steve Stricker said postponing the Ryder Cup was "the right thing to do under the circumstances".

He added: "At the end of the day, we want to stage a Ryder Cup that will rival all other Ryder Cups in my home state of Wisconsin, and now we have the opportunity to showcase the event as it was meant to be seen."  

European counterpart Padraig Harrington said: "Rescheduling the Ryder Cup was never going to be an easy decision given the many factors to take into consideration.

"But I believe it is the right assessment given the unprecedented circumstances we are facing at this time. 

"When you think of the Ryder Cup you think of the distinctive atmosphere generated by the spectators, such as around the first tee at Le Golf National two years ago.

"If that cannot be responsibly recreated at Whistling Straits in September, then it is correct that we all wait until it can be. 

"I know, right now, that September 2021 feels like a long time away. But it will come around quickly and I guarantee that the European players and I will be ready when it does."

There have been more than 32,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Wisconsin, according to the state's Department of Health Services. 

In total, there have been nearly 3.1million positive tests in the United States, with more than 134,000 deaths among those known to have contracted the virus.

The Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits has been rescheduled to take place in 2021, organisers have confirmed, with the Presidents Cup moving to 2022.

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