Anthony Davis became the latest star to suffer an injury during NBA preseason as the Brooklyn Nets eased to a 91-77 win over the Los Angeles Lakers in China.

Davis suffered a sprained thumb midway through the first quarter, joining the Nets' Kyrie Irving on the sidelines after he aggravated a facial injury in the sides' previous meeting on Thursday.

Star Lakers signing Davis tweaked his thumb while going up to block a shot at the rim, staying in the game for a short period before heading to the locker room for further evaluation.

He came back to the sidelines with an ice pack taped to his right hand and was ruled out for the rest of the game.

Davis served as the starting center, finishing the game with six points while shooting 2-of-7 from the field - both buckets coming off assists from LeBron James.

The former New Orleans Pelicans superstar added three rebounds and two blocks in 12 minutes before leaving due to the injury.

Los Angeles were able to keep it close through the first half but saw the Nets pull clear in the third quarter as Caris LeVert shone in Irving's absence.

LeVert left the previous clash early with a knock, but he scored 22 points on 8-of-11 shooting and grabbed four rebounds. Taurean Prince also played a big role off the bench with 14 points.

The game brought to an end a trip to China that has been clouded in controversy stemming from a since-deleted tweet by Daryl Morey earlier this week, with the Houston Rockets GM supporting anti-government protesters in Hong Kong.

The two scheduled fixtures went ahead but all media availability was cancelled, overshadowing what had been expected to be a celebration of the NBA in one of its key international markets.

As the teams return to the United States, the Lakers' next preseason game is set for Monday against the Golden State Warriors at Staples Center.

The Nets host the Toronto Raptors next on Friday at Barclays Center.

Zion Williamson rose to the occasion on his first home match as an NBA player, scoring a game-high 26 points in the New Orleans Pelicans' preseason win over the Utah Jazz.

The Pelicans triumphed 128-127, with Williamson's impressive points tally coming in only 23 minutes on the court.

Drafted number one overall ahead of the 2019-20 season, the 19-year-old also had five rebounds and a plus-minus of +13, the best recorded by a player on either team.

Williamson shot 9-of-12 from the field, draining his only three-point attempt from 25 feet of the match to score his first in the professional ranks.

He battled with the Jazz's defensive star Rudy Gobert, delighting the sold-out crowd at the Smoothie King Center by making two layups against the Frenchman, collecting two fouls and following up his one miss in their enthralling head-to-head with a two-handed slam.

"You gotta give him respect, two-time Defensive Player of the Year," Williamson said of Gobert after the game. 

"I just went in there strong and tried to finish."

Of his first career three, Williamson added: "It was great, my first instinct was how to get back on defense as coach gets upset about that. 

"Hopefully I get a lot more of them throughout the year.

"It was great to finally get out here and see the support we have here in New Orleans. I'm glad they came out, hopefully we'll see them all season. I hope I can continue to play the way I am."

Prior to facing the Jazz, he had 29 points in 27 minutes against the Chicago Bulls after a 16-point debut against the Atlanta Hawks.

Gobert took solace in not being dunked on by Williamson but said: "He has a great future ahead of him.

"He's kind of surprisingly agile and I think he catches a lot of people off guard because of that. He can change direction pretty quick."

Kyrie Irving's Brooklyn Nets debut lasted just a minute as the much-discussed NBA preseason game against the Los Angeles Lakers went ahead in Shanghai on Thursday.

Irving, who signed for the Nets alongside the injured Kevin Durant for the upcoming season, was trying to play through a facial fracture suffered in a pickup game last month, wearing a clear mask.

However, the former Boston Celtics star appeared to aggravate the issue early on as he clashed with Rajon Rondo and was immediately withdrawn.

The contest at least finally meant some basketball was played amid a week of controversy stemming from a since-deleted tweet by Houston Rockets GM Daryl Morey supporting anti-government protesters in Hong Kong.

Morey's comments overshadowed what had been expected to be a celebration of the NBA in one of their key international markets in China.

Some fallout continued, with media duties for both teams and league commissioner Adam Silver cancelled, but the game represented a brief respite from a tumultuous few days.

The Nets prevailed 114-111 as some of the NBA's top stars took to the floor, although Caris LeVert followed Irving in making an early exit with an apparent eye problem.

Their absences made Spencer Dinwiddie the key man as he scored 20 points and Taurean Prince added 18 to lead six Nets in double figures.

LeBron James scored 20 points in 24 minutes to pace the Lakers, as he and Anthony Davis (16 points in 25 minutes) shared the floor as team-mates for the first time.

Brooklyn's Theo Pinson broke 111-111 tie with 20.9 seconds to play by hitting the second of two free throws, before Dzanan Musa's dunk with nine seconds left capped the scoring.

Los Angeles had a last shot to tie on Kentavious Caldwell-Pope's three-pointer as the clock ran down, but it bounced away.

United States president Donald Trump blasted Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr and San Antonio Spurs boss Gregg Popovich for their responses to questions about the NBA-China controversy.

Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey issued an apology on Sunday for a now-deleted tweet, that read "Fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong" amid the ongoing protests in the region.

The issue has highlighted the NBA's relationship with China, which Kerr was noncommittal about on Monday when asked about the fallout from Morey.

Kerr and Popovich have been highly critical of Trump in the past and the country's leader was scathing of the NBA coaches.

"I watched this guy, Steve Kerr, and he was like a little boy who was so scared to be even answering the question," Trump told reporters Wednesday when asked about Kerr's refusal to discuss the issue.

"He couldn't answer the question. He was shaking. 'Oh, I don't know. I don't know.' He didn't know how to answer the question. And yet he'll talk about the United States very badly."

On Popovich – who was also reluctant to discuss the issue of protests in Hong Kong – Trump said: "I watched Popovich. Sort of the same thing, but he didn't look quite as scared actually.

"But they talk badly about the United States, but when it talks about China, they don't want to say anything bad. I thought it was pretty sad actually. It'll be very interesting."

Trump added: "I watch the way that Kerr and Popovich and some of the others were pandering to China, and yet to our own country, it's like they don't respect it.

"It's like they don't respect it. I said, 'What a difference – isn't it sad?' It's very sad. To me, it's very sad."

Made aware of Trump's comments about Kerr, Warriors superstar Stephen Curry – who has also been critical of the US president – replied: "welcome Steve to the club".

Kevin Durant thinks the New York Knicks are not "the cool thing right now", which is why they have struggled to land big names in free agency.

Ten-time NBA All-Star Durant was long touted as a potential target for the Knicks, along with Kyrie Irving, and became an unrestricted free agent after declining his player option with the Golden State Warriors.

However, the 2014 MVP – who sustained an Achilles tear in Game 5 of the NBA Finals and is expected to miss the entire 2019-20 season – signed a four-year, $164million contract with the Brooklyn Nets.

Durant will team up with Irving at Barclays Center, while Kawhi Leonard plumped for the Los Angeles Clippers as the Knicks came up empty-handed.

Explaining his decision in an interview with Hot 97 in New York, Durant said: "I think a lot of fans look at the Knicks as a brand and expect these younger players — who in their lifetime don't remember the Knicks being good — [to look at it the same way].

"I didn't grow up with the Knicks being good. Well, I remember the Knicks being in the Finals, but the kids after me didn't see that. So, the brand of the Knicks to them isn't as cool to them as, let's say, the Golden State Warriors or even the Lakers or the Nets now.

"The cool thing right now is not the Knicks."

Durant admitted he "thought about" signing with the Knicks, but never seriously considered it.

"It's just a thought," he added. "I didn't really do any full analysis on the Knicks.

"Basketball is the most important thing for me, so playing with Kyrie, DeAndre Jordan, the young players they've [the Nets] got, was key.

"Playing with Golden State, playing with an older group, I thought it was time for me to kind of impose my will on a younger group.

"I just wanted to be around a nice group of young players and also a good mix of vets."

Russell Westbrook had mixed feelings after his Houston Rockets debut ended in defeat to the Toronto Raptors in Tokyo.

Lining up alongside James Harden for the first time since the two former NBA MVPs were reunited with his offseason trade, Westbrook scored 13 points, adding six assists, two rebounds and a steal in a 21-minute outing.

Harden impressed with a game-high 34 points, but the Rockets went down 134-129 in Tuesday's preseason game. The two teams will do it all again in Japan's capital on Thursday.

"It wasn't bad - unfortunately we didn't win and that's the main goal," Westbrook said. 

"But it was good to get on the floor for the first time, get up and down, try to find a rhythm. We've got a lot of work to do, including myself getting in better shape and game condition, so we'll get it together.

"I'd love to play here for the Olympics, I think its an unbelievable place to be. I love Tokyo, the fans here and the atmosphere. 

"But our main focus now is on the season and finishing the season like we want to with the championship trophy."

Harden's 27-minute performance, in which he connected with 4-of-7 three-pointers, came as he continues to stress the importance of intensity in the Rockets' preseason games.

"We've been doing an unbelievable job in practice of pushing ourselves," said Harden, who had scored 37 against the Los Angeles Clippers last time out.

"Even in these preseason games we are trying to push it past our limits. That way, when the season starts in a few weeks, we'll be ready.

"I'm still working on my conditioning. I know for myself and Russ, who was excited for his first game out there, conditioning isn't where we want it to be, so that's what these games are for. 

"We are focusing on our team and getting better - we have a great opportunity ahead of us and we're focused every single day. We're glad to see Russ out there on the basketball court."

Of the Tokyo crowd, Harden added: "It was amazing. They got an opportunity to see what NBA basketball is about, what Rockets basketball is about. They brought the energy.

"They were excited from the beginning of the game. They made us want to go out there and put on a show, so hopefully it can be that same kind of atmosphere on Thursday."

Pascal Siakam had 24 points for the Raptors, who were playing their first preseason game.

Zion Williamson described his NBA debut as "a lot of fun" after he produced one of his customary dunks in the New Orleans Pelicans' preseason win over the Atlanta Hawks.

Williamson was on the floor for 28 minutes of the Pelicans' 133-109 victory in Atlanta, with the first pick in the 2019 NBA Draft scoring 16 points to go along with seven rebounds, three assists and three steals.

He also produced a moment which showed just why he is one of the most hyped prospects to enter the league, driving at Hawks center Damian Jones and bypassing his attempted block to finish with authority.

"It was a lot of fun," Williamson said afterwards.

"First NBA game – it's not going to count on the record – but it's the first one of hopefully many and I'm glad I can get that one under my belt."

Discussing his dunk on Jones, he added: "I just saw the lane open up and this isn't high school or college anymore, you've got to go up strong so I went up strong and I was able to finish."

However, Williamson was keen to stress he is so much more than just a player capable of producing highlight-worthy plays.

"I don't think just dunking would have got me here," he said.

"I had to be somewhat of a good basketball player to get here, so whenever I have a chance to showcase my other abilities I try."

While it appeared that Williamson was enjoying himself, he noted that he still has plenty to learn.

He was 0-for-2 on three-point attempts and was heckled by the crowd for missing a free-throw try, ending up 4-for-7 from the line.

"If it was up to me I'd probably be out there laughing and joking a lot more," Williamson admitted.

"But I'm a rookie, I’m trying to feel things out. If I feel like I can do a lot more laughing and playing, I'm going to do it. But for now I'm low-key."

New Orleans Pelicans head coach Alvin Gentry wants the comparisons of Zion Williamson to LeBron James to stop.

Williamson, the top pick in the 2019 draft, has been touted as one of the NBA's next greats, which has led to him being likened to future Hall of Famer James

However, Gentry wants to nip such talk in the bud as the preseason gets underway.

"They shouldn't do that [comparing]," the Pelicans coach said, via ESPN. "We are not doing that. We are comparing Zion to Zion. We want Zion to be the best Zion Williamson that he can be. Not anybody else. We want him to be the best basketball player he can become using his name and no comparison.

"I know that it's inevitable that that's going to be the case, but we are not drinking that Kool-Aid."

Williamson garnered buzz during his lone season with Duke, where it was quickly projected he would be the first overall pick in the draft.

"There's very few guys — at 19 years old — who can come in and impact this league," Gentry said. "There's one in California but there's also not anybody like him."

Despite the hype, Williamson and Gentry seem to be trying to have fun before the season.

When Williamson walked past Gentry as he was talking to reporters, he joked: "Did they ask about me?" 

Gentry replied: "Now why would they do that?"

Williamson will take to the court in his first preseason game on Monday against the Atlanta Hawks.

Kyle Lowry has agreed a one-year, $31million contract extension with the Toronto Raptors. 

The All-Star guard's agent, Mark Bartelstein, revealed that an extra 12 months has been added to a deal which still has one year left and is worth $33.3million.

Lowry's extension will keep him off the free agent market next year.

Raptors president Masai Ujiri, general manager Bobby Webster and Lowry's agents at Priority Sports have been trying to work out an extension for months. 

Bartelstein said the way Toronto handled the situation and the importance the organisation placed on Lowry made a huge impact.

"We are so appreciative of how Masai and Bobby handled every aspect of this negotiation," Bartelstein told ESPN.

"Once again, they displayed how they look after their players in a first-class manner, especially someone like Kyle who they recognise has such a legacy with the franchise."

Lowry, 34, has said that he wants to finish his career with Toronto and that he was not looking forward to hitting the free agency market.

Now that the Raptors are coming off their NBA title-winning season, the team is eager to build up its roster with Lowry as a key centerpiece.

Lowry becomes the first player older than 33 to get an extension that includes a first-year salary-cap hit north of $30 million. However, he is still eligible to be traded this upcoming season.

Since Lowry joined the Raptors in 2012, he has been part of five All-Star teams. He is entering his 15th season in the league and eighth with Toronto, which makes him the longest-tenured player on the roster.

During the Raptors' postseason run, Lowry averaged 15.0 points per game with 6.6 assists and 4.9 rebounds in 37.5 minutes of play.

Draymond Green said there is a lack of familiarity at the Golden State Warriors as the NBA Finals runners-up work on their chemistry following roster changes.

It has been a busy offseason for the Warriors after going down to the Toronto Raptors in the Finals, losing All-Star Kevin Durant to the Brooklyn Nets via free agency.

Veterans Andre Iguodala (traded to the Memphis Grizzlies) and Shaun Livingston (retired) also departed as the Warriors acquired D'Angelo Russell and a number of young recruits.

With the Warriors eyeing a sixth successive trip to the Finals, star Green spoke to reporters after Friday's practice and said: "A lot different. But it's fun, though.

"Just the lack of familiarity. You get used to a certain thing for so long, and then it's not that. The normal reads that you would make, just kind of second nature, you got to make sure they're there.

"It's just a lot more making sure everyone's on the same page, or getting there. Everybody's not on the same page, which is to be expected, so just getting everybody there is the difference."

Green, who will lead the way alongside Stephen Curry as Klay Thompson recovers from a serious knee injury, added: "It's time. It's reps. Just kind of getting those reps. Figuring guys out, getting to know each other. That's a huge part of basketball, too, getting to know each other ... That will come with time.

"It's no tough love right now. You figure that stuff out as time goes on. But none of us really know each other, except a few. So you can't give a guy you don't know tough love, that's fake as hell. If you're going to give somebody tough love, you don't even know if you love that person or not yet. So you can't give somebody tough love at this point, you just got to teach 'em."

The Warriors will open their preseason against the Los Angeles Lakers on Saturday.

Golden State will get their first taste of Chase Center in San Francisco, after saying goodbye to Oracle Arena following 47 years in Oakland.

Asked about Golden State's new home, Warriors head coach Steve Kerr said: "I think mainly the noise. It's hard to judge on a preseason game, but it feels like they did a really good job keeping the seats as close to the floor as possible.

"Some of the new arenas feel so vacuous, and this feels pretty intimate. I think we're going to have a really loud atmosphere in here, but we'll see."

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson wants to be like Golden State Warriors and NBA All-Star Stephen Curry when he takes the gridiron.

Wilson and Curry are champions in their respective sports – the former an NFL Super Bowl champion with the Seahawks in 2014.

Curry has led the Warriors to three NBA titles since being drafted by Golden State in 2009.

After the Seahawks' narrow 30-29 win over the Los Angeles Rams on Thursday, Wilson said he is inspired by Curry.

"I think about Steph Curry and how he shoots a basketball — that's how I want to throw a football," Wilson said. "Put it on the money, make some crazy throws, make some crazy plays.

"I love watching sports, and he's one of my favourite guys to watch with how he shoots a basketball."

Wilson had an MVP-calibre performance to help push Seattle to 4-1 fir the season after finishing 17-of-23 passing for 268 yards against the Rams.

But nothing was as impressive as his first-half touchdown pass to Tyler Lockett that pretty much should have never happened.

The completion probability of the exact play was a mere 6.3 per cent, according to Next Gen Stats, and made for a Curry-like shot except for this time the ball was in Wilson's hands.

The pass to Lockett was one of four touchdown throws Wilson had on Thursday.

"He's been phenomenal," Lockett said. "The biggest thing is he's just doing his job. He's doing everything that we expect him to do and even more. He's putting us in a position to be great, to be able to win, to be able to finish games, to finish drives. That's what you want in a player. That's what you want in a captain."

Wilson continued his near-perfect performance, finishing with a 151.8 quarterback rating, to solidify one of the best starts of his career.

"It was just one after another after another after another after another," Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll said.

The Seahawks will take their momentum on the road to face the Cleveland Browns on October 13.

NBA training camp began on Tuesday and the regular season is just around the corner.

Once preseason play begins Friday, plenty of rookies will be set loose so they can show what they can do before rotations are narrowed.

Each year first-year players exceed the expectations set for them, so we have put together a shortlist of who you should look out for.

Here are five under-the-radar rookies you should keep an eye on:

 

Chris Clemons, Guard, Rockets 

There is no guarantee Chris Clemons will make the Houston Rockets' roster, but we have a good feeling he will be in the mix this season.

The Campbell product led the nation in scoring in 2018-19, averaging 30.1 points and ended his college career as the third-highest scorer ever in NCAA Division I men's basketball history.

Although Clemons is 5-9, he has above-average athleticism and a willingness to fire the long ball while making them at an efficient clip, which makes him perfect for Houston.

He made five three-pointers and scored 21 points in 18 minutes in the fourth quarter of the Rockets' exhibition win against the Shanghai Sharks on Monday.

Houston's analytics-driven offense will always have room for snipers who make the most of open space.

Brandon Clarke, Forward, Grizzlies 

Brandon Clarke had plenty of critics leading up to the 2019 NBA Draft, but the undersized forward answered a lot of questions during summer league play.

Clarke helped lead the Memphis Grizzlies to an NBA Summer League title in July and was awarded MVP honours twice in Las Vegas.

At 6-8, he is not the most physically imposing power forward. However, his athleticism, natural defensive instincts, high motor, efficient finishing around the basket, and dedication to improving as a perimeter shooter will make it hard to keep him off the floor.

Most eyes will be on 2019's second overall pick Ja Morant and second-year forward Jaren Jackson, and that will give Clarke an opportunity to continue exceeding expectations.

Carsen Edwards, Guard, Celtics

If there is one thing that stands out about Carsen Edwards, it is his ability to fill it up on difficult shot attempts.

Although he will be backing up an All-NBA talent in Kemba Walker, Edwards should have ample opportunity to run the offense with the Boston Celtics. Especially since Marcus Smart is not much of an on-ball guard.

Edwards' quick release and seemingly unlimited shooting range helped him average 24.3 points at Purdue last year and 34.8 points in the NCAA tournament.

He is one guy who will not hesitate to shoot his shot and establish a role for himself early.

Bruno Fernando, Center, Hawks

Bruno Fernando slipped through the cracks after originally being considered a lottery prospect in 2019, but he still has plenty of promise.

He is a capable two-way player who averaged 13.6 points, 10.6 rebounds and 1.9 blocks last season at Maryland and will compete to back up Alex Len down low.

Fernando's large frame, athleticism and potential to affect games as a post passer could make him valuable on a team with plenty of young talent that will attract more attention.

Nickeil Alexander-Walker, Guard, Pelicans

Nickeil Alexander-Walker will certainly benefit from the New Orleans Pelicans' versatility at the guard spots.

Much like Lonzo Ball and Jrue Holiday, who will likely form one of the NBA's best defensive backcourts in 2019-20, Alexander-Walker can play on or off the ball.

Although he is 6-5 his 6-9 wingspan only adds to the great length of the Pelicans' ball handlers. 

The Canadian's aggressive driving and craftiness around the rim are complemented by the developing shot creation skills he showcased in the summer league.

New Orleans' combination of young, athletic finishers and a sharpshooter in JJ Redick have set the table for Alexander-Walker to thrive in a reserve role.

Draymond Green is confident the Golden State Warriors can reach the NBA Finals for the sixth successive season.

The Warriors contested their fifth consecutive Finals last season but went down to the Toronto Raptors in six games.

Since then, the Warriors have lost All-Star Kevin Durant to the Brooklyn Nets via free agency, while veteran Andre Iguodala was dealt to the Memphis Grizzlies and Shaun Livingston retired.

Klay Thompson is also recovering from a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) suffered in the Finals but Green remains bullish about Golden State's chances in 2019-20.

"I am not sure what everyone's expectations are," Green told ESPN. "We haven't really had any team meetings yet. But I know what my expectations are -- they don't change from year-to-year. They are always the same."

Asked if the Warriors – who acquired D'Angelo Russell in the offseason – can reach the Finals, Green said: "Is Steph Curry on our team? Klay Thompson? "Yup."

Green added: "Because I think obviously what we have returning and myself, Steph and Klay-- with the experience that we have, the championship pedigree that we have, and obviously all of us still being in our primes.

"Then you add in a young D'Angelo Russell, you add in Kevon Looney who just got a new contract -- it is a lot of talent. Like I said, experience and also a lot of younger guys who are out to prove themselves."

Warriors team-mate Stephen Curry said: "As long as we have the solid core that we've got. And the experiences to kind of back us up, we're going to keep that goal in mind.

"The fun part about it is that we get to kind of recreate the look of it and incorporating the new pieces that we have and that part's the most exciting. The last five Finals have kind of been a certain way, so whatever we do from here, you're going to enjoy it even more."

Philadelphia 76ers star Joel Embiid wants to win the NBA's MVP award and lead his team to the Eastern Conference top seed following a heartbreaking season.

The 76ers fell agonisingly short of a Conference Finals berth after succumbing to Kawhi Leonard's stunning Game 7 buzzer-beater and eventual champions the Toronto Raptors in May.

Embiid – who dealt with injury and illness throughout the playoffs – was left in tears after the game but the All-Star is setting huge goals in 2019-20, having been haunted by the loss to the Raptors.

"Last year I played the most games I've ever played, 64. This year I see myself playing over 70 games," Embiid told ESPN.

"That's going to be good for us because we're trying to get the number one seed and we're trying to win over 60 games. It's going to help me because I need that team success if I want to win be able to win MVP or Defensive Player of the Year."

"Last year I started off too high, playing 35-36 minutes a game and then I started slowing down," said Embiid, who averaged 27.5 points and 13.6 rebounds during the regular season.

"This year, we're going to start off, not slow and not a minute restriction, but we'll start off at the right number, like 30-31 minutes to start, and then as the season goes on you start ramping up.

"It's hard to balance it. I'm competitive. I want to be out there with my guys. But you can win MVP playing 70 games."

The 76ers head into the upcoming season as one of the challengers once again, despite the departures of Jimmy Butler and JJ Redick, thanks to the re-signing of Tobias Harris and arrivals of Al Horford and Josh Richardson. However, all eyes will be on 76ers All-Star Ben Simmons and his shooting.

Simmons averaged 16.9 points, 8.8 rebounds and 7.7 assists last season to earn his first All-Star selection, but the former number one draft pick's three-point struggles and reluctance to shoot from beyond the arc were well documented.

However, after a gruelling off-season with an emphasis on his shooting woes, Simmons said: "If it's open, I'll take it.

"It just changes the dynamic of the game and the way guys have to guard you. Once I get into rhythm and feel comfortable, I think it will change a lot of things."

Klay Thompson's long road to recovery will extend until at least the NBA All-Star break, the Golden State Warriors announced.

Thompson suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in game of the NBA Finals against the Toronto Raptors, who triumphed.

Golden State general manager Bob Myers spoke with media on Monday and told reporters: "He's doing fine.

"We'll have another update on him probably around the All-Star break. Don't construe that as if we think he'll be back by the All-Star break — that just means we'll have an update then."

The Warriors expressed optimism that Thompson will play at some point in the upcoming season.

The five-time All-Star will be entering his eighth season with the Warriors and is taking a true team approach.

"I'm going to do what the team says," Thompson said. "And I've done my due diligence on rehabs and ACL injuries, and the last thing you want to do is rush back, especially for a player like me who wants to play until he's in his late 30s.

"I want to play at a high level until that point, too. As much as it kills me not to be on the court, patience is a virtue, and rushing back would be not very smart."

Thompson had scored a game-high 30 points before being forced to leave the Game 6 contest against the Raptors, living up to the lethal "Game 6 Klay" persona he has taken on in recent years during the postseason.

The Warriors went on to lose Game 6 as the Raptors claimed their first championship.

Thompson averaged 21.5 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.4 assists per game and shot 40.2 per cent from beyond the arc in 2018-19.

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