The NFL will not be on the right side of history until it apologises to Colin Kaepernick directly or assigns him a team, according to New Orleans Saints safety Malcolm Jenkins.

In a video released on Friday, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell conceded the league did not listen early enough when players protested against racial injustice and police brutality.

Goodell said: "We, the National Football League, admit we were wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier and encourage all to speak out and peacefully protest.

"We, the National Football League, believe black lives matter."

His words followed widespread protests across the United States - further demonstrations have since taken place throughout the world - after the death of African American George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota last month.

The commissioner's statement also came after a video featuring several star players, including Super Bowl MVP Patrick Mahomes, called on the league to "admit wrong in silencing our players from peacefully protesting."

Goodell did not specifically mention Kaepernick, who has been out of the league since the end of a 2016 season that saw him become the first to protest by kneeling during the national anthem.

Jenkins, the co-founder of the Players Coalition to end social injustice and racial inequality, told CBS': "I still don't think [the NFL has] gotten it right.

"Until they apologise, specifically, to Colin Kaepernick, or assign him to a team, I don't think that they will end up on the right side of history.

"At the end of the day, they've listened to their players, they've donated money, they've created an Inspire Change platform. They've tried to do things up to this point.

"But it's been one player in particular that they have ignored and not acknowledged, and that's Colin Kaepernick."

Carlos Hyde believes the NFL can prove it is making progress by bringing back quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Amid anti-racism protests in the United States and around the world after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last month, the NFL apologised for not listening to its players earlier.

Kaepernick knelt during the national anthem, starting in 2016, in protest against racial injustice and police brutality, but that was the last season the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback played in the NFL.

Hyde, a former team-mate of Kaepernick's at the 49ers, said the quarterback should be signed by another team.

"The NFL could start by signing 'Kaep' back," the Seattle Seahawks running back said on Monday.

"If they sign 'Kaep' back, that'll show that they're really trying to move in a different direction. 'Kaep' was making the statement four years ago about what's going on in today's world, and the NFL didn't bother to listen to him then.

"I think they should start by doing that."

Hyde, who signed with the Seahawks last month, said he agreed with Kaepernick's move in 2016.

"I remember 'Kaep' making his peaceful protest, and I was all for it. I understand the message he was putting out," he said.

"I understood, because I came from Cincinnati, Ohio – Lincoln Heights in Cincinnati, it's not the best area. I would see police brutality, pretty much everybody in the neighbourhood struggling, violence, drugs, all that. There's not opportunity there.

"I was fortunate enough to have my grandmother live in Naples, Florida, so I was able to get away from all of that and pretty much start my life over.

"But not everybody is fortunate enough to have grandparents who live other places. So with that, I was all for what 'Kaep' was saying, I'm still for it."

The NFL must now directly address Colin Kaepernick, Eric Reid and Kenny Stills having admitted it was wrong on anthem protests, Houston Texans safety Michael Thomas has said.

Thomas, then with the Miami Dolphins, was among those who took a knee in 2016 at NFL games for the United States' anthem, a movement that was started by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Kaepernick to protest police brutality and racial injustice.

Those issues have been brought to the fore following the death of George Floyd and last week several high-profile NFL players were involved in a video that asked the league to condemn racism and admit it was wrong for "silencing our players from peacefully protesting".

Commissioner Roger Goodell responded by conceding the league was "wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier", which was seen as a significant step given how Kaepernick, who has been out of the league since the 2016 season, was treated at the time and in the following seasons.

However, Thomas says the NFL can do more and he wants the league to recognise Kaepernick, Reid and Stills directly.

In a text message to Peter King for his Football Morning in America column, Thomas said: "It is definitely a step in the right direction.

"However, I personally believe that people are going to call for the league to address what happened to the players who originally protested police brutality and systemic racism and oppression.

"They will ask that the league not only admit they were wrong for suppressing the voices of the players protesting, but also say their names, just like it's important to say the names of the countless black people who have been murdered due to police brutality so they don't die in vain.

"It's important that the league says the names Colin Kaepernick, Eric Reid, Kenny Stills. It will allow the players to fully believe them and we could then all move forward together."

Atlanta Falcons head coach Dan Quinn joined fellow members of the NFL franchise in a peaceful protest on Sunday after George Floyd's death.

There have been nationwide protests in the United States after Floyd – an African-American man – died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25.

A police officer was filmed kneeling on Floyd's neck during an arrest after he was crying out for help as he was handcuffed and pinned to the ground.

Quinn took part in the march to the governor's mansion in Atlanta amid efforts to eradicate racial injustice, and he was joined by Falcons general manager Thomas Dimitroff.

Assistant coaches Bernie Parmalee and Doug Mallory were also involved, as well as players like Ricardo Allen, LaRoy Reynolds, Tyeler Davison and Mykal Walker.

"What I've learned about leadership is that it is about other people, and we have to hold ourselves accountable to help those around us," Quinn said via ESPN. "That's what I wanted to do today."

Dimitroff added: "I've always believed we are all created equal and should be treated as such but have passively held back my voice. I've decided it's time for me to step up and take action.''

Washington Redskins running back Adrian Peterson will "without a doubt" take a knee during the United States national anthem to protest racial injustice following George Floyd's death.

There have been nationwide protests in the United States after Floyd – an African-American man – died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25.

A police officer was filmed kneeling on Floyd's neck during an arrest after he was crying out for help as he was handcuffed and pinned to the ground.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was the first player to kneel during the anthem in protest against racial injustice in 2016, before he was released the following year.

New Orleans Saints star Drew Brees said players who knelt during the anthem were "disrespecting the flag", comments which sparked fierce backlash and led to an apology.

Peterson – a former team-mate of Brees in New Orleans – weighed in and the 35-year-old told the Houston Chronicle: "Just four years ago, you're seeing [Colin] Kaepernick taking a knee, and now we're all getting ready to take a knee together going into this season, without a doubt."

"Yeah, without a doubt, without a doubt," 2012 NFL MVP Peterson replied when asked if he personally planned to take a knee.

"We've got to put the effort in as a group collectively. Are they going to try to punish us all? If not, playing football is going to help us save lives and change things, then that's what it needs to be."

Redskins veteran and seven-time Pro Bowler Peterson, who moved to Washington from the Arizona Cardinals in 2018, ran for 898 yards and five touchdowns last season.

The New England Patriots paid tribute to their former wide receiver Reche Caldwell following reports he was killed on Saturday in Tampa, Florida.

Caldwell, 41, was shot in his leg and chest outside his home, according to TMZ.

Caldwell's mother, Deborah Caldwell, told the Tampa Bay Times: "You get killed right here in your hometown? You made a statement here, and y'all just took it away from us?

"All of us are imperfect people, but he's perfect to me. He was my hero."

Caldwell was the leading receiver on the 2006 Patriots, who lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC Championship Game.

The Patriots said in a Twitter message: "We are deeply saddened to learn of the death of former Patriot Reche Caldwell. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends."

Caldwell played for the University of Florida before the San Diego Chargers selected him in the second round of the 2002 draft.

The Gators said: "We are deeply saddened by the loss of former Gator WR Reche Caldwell."

He had 152 catches for 1,851 yards and 11 touchdowns in an NFL career that also included a stint with the Washington Redskins.

The Chargers also expressed sorrow at hearing the news, saying: "Our thoughts and prayers go out to Reche’s family, friends and teammates during this difficult time."

Caldwell’s brother, Andre Caldwell, also played at the University of Florida and spent eight seasons in the NFL.

Denver Broncos players and coaches helped lead a protest on Saturday following the death of George Floyd.

There have been nationwide protests in the United States after Floyd – an African-American man – died in police custody in Minneapolis last week.

Broncos star Von Miller was involved in the march through downtown Denver during a 'Black Lives Matter' protest – the Super Bowl champion and MVP joined by the likes of team-mates Kareem Jackson and Drew Lock.

"The time is always right to do what's right," Miller said. "Once we have awareness, we gotta come up out of oblivion. ... We've got to use our moral compass to make decisions on what's right. Black, white -- it doesn't matter.

"... I'm proud of these guys. I'm proud of Denver. I'm proud of the state of Colorado. We've got to keep this going."

Broncos head coach Vic Fangio, as well as president and chief executive Joe Ellis and vice-president of strategic initiatives Brittany Bowlen were also in attendance.

Fangio issued an apology following backlash during the week after saying he did not believe racism and discrimination were prevalent in the NFL. 

Broncos linebacker Jeremiah Attaochu addressed the crowd on Saturday and said: "We're out here as players ... to be an agent of change with policy and really taking part in the way this country works.

"And that's the only way we're going to fix things -- is if we use our voices to speak out on policies and things that are not allowing our people to be successful to have a chance in life. We can't keep putting a Band-Aid on an old wound."

Malcolm Jenkins credited New Orleans Saints team-mate Drew Brees "for listening" after the NFL quarterback sent a message to United States president Donald Trump saying he stood by his apology.

Brees, the NFL's all-time leader for passing yardage and touchdown passes, caused outrage earlier this week when he said those who protest against racial injustice by kneeling during the national anthem are "disrespecting the flag".

A tearful Jenkins, who returned to the Saints this offseason, described Brees' comments as "hurtful" and "insensitive", with the quarterback later issuing two apologies and an admission he had "completely missed the mark".

While his apologies were welcomed by Saints colleagues, Trump - a vocal critic of those, like Colin Kaepernick, who have knelt during the national anthem - suggested Brees was wrong to row back on his initial views.

However, Brees later posted an Instagram note addressed to Trump in which he reiterated "this is not an issue about the American flag", words which were welcomed by Jenkins.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

To @realdonaldtrump Through my ongoing conversations with friends, teammates, and leaders in the black community, I realize this is not an issue about the American flag. It has never been. We can no longer use the flag to turn people away or distract them from the real issues that face our black communities. We did this back in 2017, and regretfully I brought it back with my comments this week. We must stop talking about the flag and shift our attention to the real issues of systemic racial injustice, economic oppression, police brutality, and judicial & prison reform. We are at a critical juncture in our nation’s history! If not now, then when? We as a white community need to listen and learn from the pain and suffering of our black communities. We must acknowledge the problems, identify the solutions, and then put this into action. The black community cannot do it alone. This will require all of us.

A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on

"Drew, as much as your comments hurt me and many other people, I appreciate you for listening because being heard is a big part of it," the safety said on his Instagram story.

Other prominent voices in the Saints' locker room were also pleased to see Brees express regret over his original comments.

Veteran defensive end Cameron Jordan wrote on Twitter: "My teammate dropped a bar... paraphrasing @demario__davis, "apology is a form of true leadership... that's taking ownership." Only through open dialogue & open hearts can we expand our comprehension and only in courage can we create positive change! @drewbrees".

Wide receiver Michael Thomas, Brees' go-to receiver over the past four seasons, retweeted his team-mate's note and wrote: "MY QB".

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees responded to United States president Donald Trump and called for change in the country.

Trump criticised the 41-year-old for apologising for his comments about kneeling during the national anthem, saying his stance should not have changed.

Brees said earlier this week he disagreed with protests in which sports stars have knelt during the anthem.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem in protest against racial injustice and police brutality while he was playing in the NFL.

After Trump's tweets on Friday, Brees responded on social media, saying it was time for change in the USA.

"To @realdonaldtrump. Through my ongoing conversations with friends, team-mates, and leaders in the black community, I realise this is not an issue about the American flag. It has never been," he wrote on Instagram.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

To @realdonaldtrump Through my ongoing conversations with friends, teammates, and leaders in the black community, I realize this is not an issue about the American flag. It has never been. We can no longer use the flag to turn people away or distract them from the real issues that face our black communities. We did this back in 2017, and regretfully I brought it back with my comments this week. We must stop talking about the flag and shift our attention to the real issues of systemic racial injustice, economic oppression, police brutality, and judicial & prison reform. We are at a critical juncture in our nation’s history! If not now, then when? We as a white community need to listen and learn from the pain and suffering of our black communities. We must acknowledge the problems, identify the solutions, and then put this into action. The black community cannot do it alone. This will require all of us.

A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on

"We can no longer use the flag to turn people away or distract them from the real issues that face our black communities.

"We did this back in 2017, and regretfully I brought it back with my comments this week. We must stop talking about the flag and shift our attention to the real issues of systemic racial injustice, economic oppression, police brutality, and judicial & prison reform. We are at a critical juncture in our nation's history! If not now, then when?

"We as a white community need to listen and learn from the pain and suffering of our black communities. We must acknowledge the problems, identify the solutions, and then put this into action. The black community cannot do it alone. This will require all of us."

United States president Donald Trump criticised New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees for apologising for his comments about kneeling during the national anthem.

Brees, 41, apologised after saying he disagreed with protests in which sports stars have knelt during the anthem.

His comments came in the wake of the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minneapolis last week, prompting demonstrations across the United States and beyond.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem in protest against racial injustice and police brutality while he was playing in the NFL.

But Trump believes Brees should not have apologised for his stance.

"I am a big fan of Drew Brees," he wrote on Twitter. "I think he's truly one of the greatest quarterbacks, but he should not have taken back his original stance on honoring our magnificent American Flag. OLD GLORY is to be revered, cherished, and flown high.

"We should be standing up straight and tall, ideally with a salute, or a hand on heart.

"There are other things you can protest, but not our Great American Flag - NO KNEELING!"

Roger Goodell admitted the NFL was "wrong" not to listen to its players earlier about racism concerns.

A day after a group of players, led by Kansas City Chiefs star Patrick Mahomes, sent a powerful message to the NFL, Goodell responded.

It comes amid protests across the United States in the wake of the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minneapolis last week.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick started kneeling during the United States national anthem in 2016 in protest against racial injustice and police brutality.

In a video posted on social media on Friday, Goodell acknowledged the NFL should have listened to its players earlier.

"It has been a difficult time for our country, in particular black people in our country. First, my condolences to the families of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and all the families who have endured police brutality," he said.

"We, the National Football League, condemn racism and the systematic oppression of black people. We, the National Football League, admit we were wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier and encourage all to speak out and peacefully protest. We, the National Football League, believe black lives matter.

"I personally protest with you and want to be part of the much-needed change in this country. Without black players, there would be no National Football League and the protests around the country are emblematic of the centuries of silence, inequality and oppression of black players, coaches, fans and staff.

"We are listening, I am listening and I will be reaching out to players who have raised their voices and others on how we can improve and go forward for a better and more united NFL family."

Two days after owner Shad Khan announced his team would take action to address racial inequality in the United States, the Jacksonville Jaguars held a march in the city on Friday to raise awareness of injustices against the African-American community. 

Several players and staff, including head coach Doug Marrone, as well as family members walked from the team's home of TIAA Bank Field to the Jacksonville Sherriff's Office in response to the death of George Floyd, a black man who died while in the custody of a white police officer in Minneapolis on May 25. 

"Today we say no more," wide receiver Chris Conley said while addressing the crowd. "Today we see a nation that can't await change, a city that won't sit still or be quiet." 

A number of players were unable to attend due to travel restrictions brought on by the coronavirus pandemic but lent their support via video messages that were posted on the Jaguars' Twitter account. 

"I believe we have people on this team, and in this organisation, that are committed to making real change," quarterback Gardner Minshew said in his message. "We realise this won't happen from one march, from one day, but a consistent effort to bring justice and equality into our city, into our community." 

Khan, a Pakistani immigrant who became the NFL's first minority owner when he purchased the Jaguars in 2011, wrote an impassioned statement posted on the team's web site on Wednesday that decried the recent racially motivated events that have triggered civil unrest in several American cities. 

"As a member of the NFL family, I recognise I have a unique opportunity to address inequity wherever it is present, expand opportunity for all who seek it, and seek justice for all who deserve it. I take that responsibility seriously," Khan said. 

"Racial discrimination has no place in our society. That's been said. But what's been done? We must have the answer today, and we will work with players, staff and more to arrive at a timely response.  

"We cannot attack the virus of racism with indifference or periodic attention. We cannot expect an easy cure or give up when the quest because inconvenient or uncomfortable." 

 

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.