Pablo Carreno Busta returned to winning ways on the ATP Tour with a gutsy 6-7 (5-7) 6-4 7-6 (7-3) triumph over Alexander Bublik in the Chengdu Open final.

The Spaniard climbed into the top 10 of the rankings in 2017 and won at Estoril, yet he had not claimed a single title in over two years since that triumph.

Carreno Busta has slumped to world number 63, but he returned to form in China this week.

The 28-year-old enjoyed impressive wins against Benoit Paire, Cristian Garin and Denis Shapovalov before finally beating Bublik on Sunday.

Carreno Busta squandered six break points against his erratic opponent, taking just one in the second game, but he kept his composure in the third-set tie-break to clinch victory.

Alex de Minaur produced a superb display to defeat Roberto Bautista Agut and set up a Zhuhai Open final with Adrian Mannarino.

The Australian, who accounted for Andy Murray in round two, dominated in a 6-2 6-2 thrashing of the world number 10.

De Minaur won 95 per cent of points on his first serve and converted four of five break points to remain firmly on track for a third title of the year.

Bautista Agut's fellow Spaniard Albert Ramos Vinolas also suffered semi-final disappointment as Mannarino burst out of the blocks in a 6-0 4-6 6-1 victory.

The Frenchman won the opening seven games and will hope to recapture that form in pursuit of a second ATP Tour title on Sunday.

There was some joy for Spain in Chengdu, where Pablo Carreno Busta booked a final showdown with Alexander Bublik.

Carreno Busta needed just 63 minutes to overcome Denis Shapovalov 6-3 6-4 while Bublik, who dismissed Grigor Dimitrov in the previous round, was a 7-6 (8-6) 6-4 winner over Lloyd Harris.

Roberto Bautista Agut maintained his 100 per cent record against Andreas Seppi as he cruised into the semi-finals of the Zhuhai Open on Friday.

The Spaniard made it four straight wins against Seppi, with the 6-2 6-2 result not just securing a place in the last four of the tournament but also strengthening his bid to qualify for the season-ending ATP Finals.

"My game is getting better and that's why I'm climbing in the ATP Rankings," the world number 10 told the ATP Tour website after triumphing in one hour and 19 minutes.

Bautista Agut is joined in the semis by compatriot Albert Ramos-Vinolas, who knocked out third seed Gael Monfils 7-5 6-4 to set up a clash with Adrian Mannarino - a 6-1 6-4 winner over Damir Dzumhur.

Meanwhile, Alex de Minaur came through via a deciding set for a second successive outing. Having battled back to knock out Andy Murray in the previous round, the seventh-seeded Australian triumphed 6-2 4-6 6-4 against fourth seed Borna Coric. His reward is a showdown with Bautista Agut on Saturday.

At the Chengdu Open, Alexander Bublik battled back from the brink of defeat to upset Grigor Dimitrov, denying the fourth seed a 300th career win.

Bublik - who served 35 aces - saved two match points in the tie-break to decide the second set before eventually going on to triumph 5-7 7-6 (9-7) 7-6 (7-3). 

Next up will be South African lucky loser Lloyd Harris, who made it through to a maiden semi-final on the ATP Tour courtesy of a three-set victory over Joao Sousa.

The other side of the draw will see eighth seed Denis Shapovalov take on Pablo Carreno Busta, the pair recording respective triumphs over Egor Gerasimov and Cristian Garin in their quarter-final ties.

Andy Murray's Zhuhai Open campaign was halted in the second round as he slipped to a 6-4 2-6 4-6 defeat against a dogged Alex De Minaur.

Murray, who edged past Tennys Sandgren on Tuesday, looked in good shape when he broke twice on his way to claiming the first set, but De Minaur recovered.

The 20-year-old Australian came out on top in some riveting rallies, with a sublime drop shot in set three a highlight as Murray's lack of match sharpness handed De Minaur the edge.

De Minaur had squandered two break points at the start of the third set, though he made no such mistake to take a 5-4 lead eight games later.

Former world number one Murray kept his chances alive with some exquisite shots, only to waste three break-back points.

Having then failed to take a first match point, De Minaur made his second one count – Murray's return into the net ending a contest lasting two hours and 42 minutes as the Australian progressed to a quarter-final with Borna Coric.

Murray will turn his focus to the China Open in Beijing as the British player continues his singles comeback following hip surgery.

Greek top seed Stefanos Tsitsipas retired due to illness prior to the third set of his encounter with France's Adrian Mannarino.

Damir Dzumhur will face Mannarino in the last eight, while second seed Roberto Bautista Agut goes up against Andreas Seppi, who saved five match points in a deciding-set tie-break en route to beating Zhizhen Zhan 7-6 (7-4) 4-6 7-6 (10-8).

Meanwhile, Chengdu Open top seed John Isner fell at his first hurdle as the American succumbed 6-7 (11-13) 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (7-4) to Egor Gerasimov of Belarus.

Gerasimov – who will next play Denis Shapovalov – was joined in the last eight by US Open semi-finalist Grigor Dimitrov, who marked his return to action with a 7-5 7-5 victory over Britain's Dan Evans.

Canadian second seed Felix Auger-Aliassime went down 6-4 6-7 (5-7) 6-4 to Portugal's Joao Sousa, Spaniard Pablo Carreno Busta defeated Frenchman Benoit Paire, while Chile's Cristian Garin dispatched Fernando Verdasco of Spain.

Nick Kyrgios has pledged to keep his emotions under wraps after he received a suspended fine and ban from the ATP Tour.

The 24-year-old caused controversy at the Western & Southern Open in August when he hurled abuse at umpire Fergus Murphy in a defeat to Karen Khachanov, while he also smashed two rackets during an unpermitted bathroom break.

Kyrgios was initially fined $113,000, but an investigation from the ATP deemed the Australian had "committed aggravated behaviour" and was also guilty of a "pattern of behaviour" when it came to verbally abusing officials or spectators.

A $25,000 fine and 16-week ban from the Tour were handed to Kyrgios on Thursday, though both are deferred for six months, with the world number 27 placed on probation and under orders to avoid any code violations that result in a fine for verbal or physical abuse, unsportsmanlike conduct or visible obscenities.

Taking to his official Instagram account, Kyrgios told his fans to stay relaxed, while promising to be "on my best behaviour" to avoid triggering the sanctions, though insisting he will not take any of the fun out of his playing style.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Guess I’m on my best behaviour for 6 months #detention

A post shared by NK (@k1ngkyrg1os) on 

"Everyone, I can still play, I'm just on probation, relax," Kyrgios wrote in a post shared on his Instagram story.

"I'll be playing and tennis will still be fun, it's ok, I just have to keep a lid on my behaviour, that's all."

Kyrgios then followed up his first post with a picture of him in action, captioned "good boy vibes", as he took the punishment in his stride.

Earlier on Thursday, Kyrgios confirmed he was pulling out of the Asian swing with a collarbone injury, though he could return in November for the Davis Cup finals.

Nick Kyrgios has been hit with a $25,000 fine and 16-week ban from the ATP Tour - both of which are suspended - following his antics at the Western & Southern in August.

The Australian was initially fined $113,000 having hurled abuse at umpire Fergus Murphy in his loss to Karen Khachanov in Cincinnati, while he also smashed two rackets during a bathroom break he had not been given permission to take.

That triggered an investigation from the ATP and the governing body found Kyrgios "committed aggravated behaviour" and was guilty of a "pattern of behaviour" when it came to verbally abusing officials or spectators.

Kyrgios' latest fine and suspension have both been deferred for a period of six months, provided there are no further code violations that result in a fine for verbal or physical abuse, unsportsmanlike conduct or visible obscenities.

He has the right to lodge an appeal against the decision within the next five working days.

The controversial world number 27 was previously handed bans and fines in 2015 and 2016, and the ATP has ordered he must receive support from a mental coach at Tour events as well as "a professional specialising in behavioural management" after the season ends.

In a separate investigation, Kyrgios received no additional penalties for comments at the US Open – when he called the ATP "corrupt" – having backtracked on those views in a social media post the following day.

Earlier in the day, Kyrgios confirmed he was pulling out of the Asian swing with a collarbone injury, though he could return in November for the Davis Cup finals.

Nick Kyrgios has pulled out of the Asian swing of the ATP Tour with a collarbone injury as he looks to recover in time for the Davis Cup finals in November.

The 24-year-old explained a problem he suffered at the Laver Cup had worsened to the point where he was returning home to Australia.

Kyrgios, ranked 23rd in the Race to London standings, is unlikely to qualify for the season-ending ATP Finals so may have played his final singles tournament in a year where he has won titles in Acapulco and Washington.

However, he said this week he hopes to recover in time to represent Australia at the Davis Cup finals in November, when Australia face Belgium and Colombia.

"Unfortunately a collarbone injury I sustained during [the] Laver Cup has escalated and has forced me to pull out of the Asian swing, I'll be heading back to Australia to rest, see you all soon," Kyrgios wrote on Instagram.

Kyrgios suffered a first-round exit against Andreas Seppi at the Zhuhai Open on Wednesday, delivering an underarm serve at one point - a successful tactic he has used in the past - due to the discomfort in his shoulder.

Nick Kyrgios suggested his season might be over after a first-round exit at the Zhuhai Open.

Italian Andreas Seppi came from 4-1 down in the first set against Kyrgios, who failed to convert three set points at 5-3, before closing out a 7-6 (7-5) 6-1 triumph.

The Australian threw in an underarm serve during the first set and cited shoulder discomfort as a factor in his collapse.

"I was battling with a bit of a shoulder/collar bone injury," he said, as quoted by the Herald Sun. "At this rate, I'm not thinking about playing until the front of my shoulder feels better."

Kyrgios reported the joint had been "clicking" during the Seppi match and, when asked whether he might sit out the rest of the season, he replied: "For sure, I mean at this rate I wouldn't be surprised.

"I wasn't able to even serve at a reasonable pace. I'm probably not going to bother playing until I can get it right again."

France's Lucas Pouille was another seed to depart as he had no answer to a supreme serving display from Soonwoo Kwon.

Kwon only lost six of 41 points on his first serve and won 7-6 (7-4) 6-2 to set up a meeting against fellow qualifier Damir Dzumhur.

Eighth seed Albert Ramos-Vinolas came through a sound examination against Miomir Kecmanovic, saving four set points in the opener before prevailing 7-6 (7-2) 6-3

Serbian Kecmanovic served at 40-0 with the first set 5-4 in his favour but could not shake off his Spanish opponent, who next meets Gail Monfils - a 5-7 6-3 6-4 winner in an entertaining encounter with Britain's Cameron Norrie.

At the Chengdu Open, Denis Shapovalov served 16 aces and saved all nine break points he afforded Ricardas Berankis in a 6-4 6-3 victory.

Canadian Shapovalov's prowess on serve was rivalled by Alexander Bublik's 25 aces in a 4-6 7-5 7-5 win against the sixth seed Taylor Fritz, where he won 83 per cent of his first-serve points.

Jordan Thompson is up next for Bublik after outlasting Vasek Pospisil 6-3 3-6 7-5 in a match clocking in at two hours and 29 minutes, while Portugal's Joao Sousa set up a meeting with second seed Felix Auger-Aliassime despite a rocky start versus wildcard Hyeon Chung.

Chung stormed to the first set in only his second tour match since a back injury in February but subsided 1-6 6-3 6-4.

Novak Djokovic believes he has a "good chance" of playing at the Japan Open Tennis Championships after recovering from a shoulder injury.

The world number one retired from his fourth-round clash against Stan Wawrinka at the US Open at the start of the month due to the injury.

But Djokovic has returned to training and believes he will be fit to take his place at the ATP 500 tournament in Tokyo starting on Monday.

"Yesterday I trained for the first time after America and there was no shoulder pain which is an encouraging circumstance," the Serbian told Sportski zurnal on Tuesday.

"For now it seems like I have a good chance of playing Tokyo. That's my intention. The next two days will be crucial to assessing shoulder recovery."

Djokovic has points to defend in Asia after winning the Shanghai Masters last year.

The 16-time grand slam champion said he would "almost certainly" play in Shanghai if he missed Tokyo.

"Tokyo and Shanghai first. My team and I believe that in the past two to three weeks we have put the shoulder in the position of being able to withstand multiple tournaments in a row," Djokovic said.

"Tokyo and Shanghai are both goals and purposes but everything is still in God's hands, the whole scenario.

"I don't know what it will be but everything is working great for now."

Andy Murray considered his Zhuhai Open victory over Tennys Sandgren on Tuesday "one of the best wins" of his career.

The former world number one had not won a singles match on the ATP Tour since the Brisbane International in January, announcing his intention to retire and having hip resurfacing surgery in the intervening months.

However, after a successful operation, Murray has been able to return to action, first on the doubles circuit before making his singles comeback in Cincinnati in August.

Not until Tuesday had Murray tasted victory though - and he ranked the gruelling 6-3 6-7 (6-8) 6-1 triumph highly, despite his many achievements on court.

"I think that, in some ways, it's one of the best wins I've had," he said. "Not in terms of just getting through that today, but everything that's gone into getting back to this point.

"You don't necessarily appreciate what it's like to be healthy at the beginning of your career. It's something that you take for granted and it's quite easy, whereas these past few years haven't been.

"Obviously, after the operation in January, it's been difficult and it was undecided at times about whether I wanted to keep going or not, and it's been tough.

"But I'm really glad that I can actually get the win today and hopefully I'll be able to keep going."

Murray was also able to provide a positive update on his fitness following the match, adding: "If I played that match in January, there's no chance I could compete the following day or even two days later. I would be in a lot of pain and discomfort.

"Now, I'm tired and fatigued and muscles and stuff are tired from playing the match. But in terms of how my hip feels, that feels really good.

"So that's very positive and I'm satisfied with that because, in January, I couldn't remember what it was like to play tennis and not have the pain in my hip."

Murray will face seventh seed Alex de Minaur next for a place in the quarter-finals.

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga rallied to beat Aljaz Bedene in three sets in Sunday's Moselle Open final, claiming his fourth title.

The former world number five, who previously won the competition in 2011, 2012 and 2015, dumped out seeds Nicoloz Basilashvili and Lucas Pouille en route to another decider.

But it was Tsonga who faced an upset when the first-set tie-break went the way of Bedene.

However, the one-time Australian Open finalist came up with an impressive response, edging another breaker in the second before starting the decider in fine fashion.

Tsonga moved 3-0 up and comfortably held while piling pressure on the Bedene serve.

He did not need another break, though, and saw out a 6-7 (4-7) 7-6 (7-4) 6-3 success and the 18th championship of his career.

Daniil Medvedev strolled to a sixth career title as he defeated Borna Coric 6-3 6-1 in the final of the St Petersburg Open.

Runner-up to Rafael Nadal in an epic US Open final earlier this month, Medvedev never looked likely to miss out on victory in his fifth successive final.

The world number four showed supreme consistency across both sets, with Coric unable to claim a single break point.

Medvedev, on the other hand, broke serve twice in set one - which he wrapped up at the third time of asking inside 41 minutes - before successive breaks in the second put him well on his way to a routine triumph.

Coric fought back in game six to ensure he was not whitewashed in the second set, although it ultimately mattered little as Medvedev served out the win with an ace.

It represents Medvedev's first ATP title in his home country, with the 23-year-old leading the way in terms of wins (57) on the ATP Tour this season.

Andy Murray says it would be "a bit naive and silly" to think he can recapture the form that took him to world number one and three grand slam titles.

The 32-year-old Scot is fighting his way back after undergoing career-saving hip surgery, and he plays four tournaments in the next four weeks as he steps up his comeback.

Murray looked finished, or as good as, at the start of the year when he said Wimbledon would be his final event before retiring.

He had a change of heart after a successful operation and is determined to make a fist of a new lease of life, after saying he is now pain-free for the first time in years.

But results have been shaky in his tentative return to singles action, with Murray losing a pair of first-round matches in Cincinnati and Winston-Salem before stepping back to play on the lower-tier ATP Challenger Tour and finally rediscovering a winning touch.

He won a pair of matches at the low-profile Rafa Nadal Open in Mallorca, but Murray wants to compete at the top level, even if he is not winning tournaments consistently.

"I'm not expecting to get back to my very best," he said, according to BBC Sport. "I think it would be probably a bit naive and silly to think that would be the case.

"I do feel like tennis-wise I can still compete at the highest level in terms of my skill, it's just whether physically I can get to a high enough level to be competitive right at the top."

Murray will have a better idea of his future prospects in a month's time, and he begins his busy schedule by playing the Zhuhai Championships in China, facing American Tennys Sandgren in the first round.

World number 69 Sandgren beat Murray in Winston-Salem, so it will be a chance to avenge that loss and show whether the former Wimbledon and US Open champion - a long-time member of the 'big four' in men's tennis - is making progress.

Murray said, on the ATP website: "I don't know how far I'm going to be able to get now on my comeback. I don't know how much improving I still have to do or if I'm going to be able to. But I'm in no pain just now, so I might as well give it a shot and see how far I will go with the recovery."

He plays events in Beijing, Shanghai and Antwerp after the Zhuhai tournament, and Murray is targeting a run of match wins to show he can become a force again.

"I'd like to try to get 12 to 15 matches between now and the end of the year so my body gets used to competing and playing matches consistently again," he said.

"I hadn't done that for two years. It's been a really long time, so it takes time for your body to build up."

Rafael Nadal was forced to pull out of his singles and doubles matches on day three of the Laver Cup with an "inflamed hand".

The French Open and US Open champion had been set to feature in a high-profile doubles pairing with Roger Federer against John Isner and Jack Sock in the opening match of Sunday's play.

Nadal was also set to take on Nick Kyrgios in singles later in the day, having been beaten by the Australian in a doubles contest late on Saturday.

But that match the previous day, in which Nadal and Stefanos Tsitsipas lost to Kyrgios and Sock, meant the Spaniard was not able to recover in time.

He complained of inflammation to his left hand on Sunday morning - an issue he says he has dealt with for "a couple of years" - and Tsitsipas was called in to take his place alongside Federer.

Thiem will play Kyrgios, meanwhile, with Team Europe aiming to wrap up a third straight title, carrying a narrow 7-5 lead into the final day.

Nadal said: "I am sad, of course. I was excited to play the doubles with Roger obviously - that's the thing that makes me more sad because, in singles, I know Dominic is going to be there and he's going to do unbelievably.

"Since a couple of years ago, I've had this bad feeling on the hand. It's an inflamation of the hand - not the wrist.

"Yesterday, I played and sometimes the next day you are a little bit better, sometimes you are a little bit worse. Today, I think it's a little bit more inflamed.

"This morning, I woke up with that feeling that something is inflamed on the hand and I texted Roger and Thomas [Enqvist, vice-captain] and Bjorn [Borg, captain].

"We needed to find a solution because I don't think I'm the right one to play today and we have a great team without me being 100 per cent. All the guys are unbelievable."

He added: "Now, let's support and hopefully we can achieve this."

Nick Kyrgios bounced back from a tough defeat to Roger Federer to keep Team World in the mix for a breakthrough Laver Cup victory in a doubles success alongside Jack Sock.

Europe, who have won the prior two editions of the competition, lead 7-5 heading into the final day, but they might have had one hand on the trophy already if not for Kyrgios.

A home side able to name a line-up where each of their six players are ranked higher than John Isner, their opponents' top star, celebrated singles triumphs for Federer and Rafael Nadal but found Kyrgios in determined mood late on Saturday evening.

Team World had struck first to level the contest at 3-3, with wins on the second day worth two points - double their first-day value, while third-day victories earn three.

Isner saw opponent Alexander Zverev fall apart and clinched a 6-7 (2-7) 6-4 10-1 success.

Pegged back, matters looked to be going from bad to worse for Europe when the dangerous Kyrgios took the first set against Federer.

But the Swiss veteran recovered to triumph 6-7 (5-7) 7-5 10-7 and it appeared to be plain sailing from there, with Nadal winning the final singles contest of the day, easing past Milos Raonic 6-3 7-6 (7-1) to regain complete control of the competition.

"Being here for me is a very positive energy," Nadal said. "I like being around such a great team and the crowd is amazing.

"I feel very lucky [to win] the first set. I started to play better later in the match and I think I played a very good tie-break in the end."

The Spaniard was back on court to close out Saturday's play, teaming up with Stefanos Tsitsipas, to take on Kyrgios and Sock.

However, Kyrgios gave an early indication of what was to come as he started in impressive fashion again with some blistering winners in an opener Team World dominated, breaking swiftly and protecting the serve with ease.

The Australian was guilty of gifting away the decisive first break in the second set, making a mess of a seemingly straightforward volley, before coming into his own again with the match level.

Nadal was too often left to plough a lone furrow by Tsitsipas and Kyrgios excelled at the net, greeting each European error in typically extravagant fashion.

Fittingly, after a one-sided tie-break, the match was clinched on Kyrgios' serve 6-4 3-6 10-6 to set up an intriguing final day.

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