NBA

LeBron James: Tom Brady and I are one in the same

By Sports Desk November 16, 2019

LeBron James insists he has no plans to call time on his NBA career, comparing himself to New England Patriots great Tom Brady.

James was the star of the show for the Los Angeles Lakers against the Sacramento Kings on Friday, scoring 29 points and providing 11 assists in a 99-97 victory.

Prior to the encounter at the Staples Center, the 34-year-old - a 15-time All Star and a three-time NBA champion - was asked if retirement had crossed his mind.

However, James dismissed the suggestion, likening himself to NFL star Brady, who is still going strong at the age of 42 and holds the record for the most number of Super Bowl wins with six.

"I'm not at the conclusion of my story," James explained to reporters.

"So no, not the way I feel right now. Me and Tom Brady are one in the same. We're going to play until we can't walk no more."

Following James' comments, Brady responded on his official Twitter account, tagging the Lakers star.

"I'm playing until I can't dunk anymore!" The quarterback tweeted.

James responded in kind: "Well I'm playing until I can't throw TD [touchdown] passes anymore!"

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