NBA

Durant, Cousins set to feature 'at some point' in NBA Finals

By Sports Desk May 23, 2019

Kevin Durant and DeMarcus Cousins should both play for the Golden State Warriors "at some point" in the NBA Finals.

The Warriors defeated the Portland Trail Blazers to reach the Finals for a fifth consecutive year, where they will face either the Milwaukee Bucks or the Toronto Raptors.

But defending champions Golden State will be without Durant and Cousins for the start of the series as they continue to recover from injuries.

Durant has been out since straining a calf in the first round, while Cousins tore his quadriceps in the same series.

The pair were assessed by Warriors medical staff on Thursday and are deemed to be making "good progress" but the team would not put a date on their returns.

Cousins is more advanced, having joined Golden State in practice.

"Warriors forward Kevin Durant (strained right calf) and center DeMarcus Cousins (torn left quadriceps muscle) were evaluated by the team's medical staff earlier today," a statement read.

"Durant, who has not yet been cleared to begin on-court activities, continues to make good progress with his rehabilitation.

"At this point, it is unlikely that he will play at the beginning of the 2019 NBA Finals, but it's hopeful that he could return at some point during the series.

"Cousins also continues to make good progress with his rehabilitation and practiced with the team today for the first time since suffering the injury on April 16.

"It's anticipated that he will play at some point during the 2019 NBA Finals, but the exact date is to be determined and depends on his progress.

"The status for both players will be updated next Wednesday [May 29]."

Durant, who has been named the Finals MVP in each of his two years in Oakland, has been widely linked with a move to the New York Knicks in free agency.

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