TTFA misstep forces clubs out of CONCACAF competitions once again

By December 05, 2019

‘Thoroughly disappointed’ is how Trinidad and Tobago Pro League chairman Brent Sancho described the news that no team from the Pro League will take part in CONCACAF competition for the second season running.

According to Sancho,the omission of T&T Pro League teams from CONCACAF competitions could have been avoided quite easily.

According to reports, the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) were informed of the sanctions from as early as November 22 but never did anything about it.

Those reports also explain that the sanction meted out by CONCACAF, is on account of the fact that the T&T Pro League has not adhered to the regional footballing governing body’s club licensing programme.

“When it happened the last time we were assured it wouldn’t happen again; and that, according to them, it was a simple error. And what makes it even worse is I didn’t find out from the TTFA, I found out from somebody from Concacaf on the day of the [TTFA] election,” Sancho told T&T website Wired868.

Trinidad and Tobago’s football has been going through a tumultuous period lately. Apart from its clubs being out of international competition over the last two seasons, the national team is now ranked 104, just two places off its worst-ever ranking. The national team also failed to advance to the CONCACAF Hex, where six teams have a chance to qualify for three spots at the 2022 World Cup in Qatar.

The team also has to go through a playoff to qualify for the 2021 Gold Cup, having watched Jamaica, Grenada, Curacao and Suriname already assure themselves of a place in that competition.

The TTFA has also recently gone through a leadership change with David John-Williams relinquishing his post to William Wallace.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

Related items

  • You did get a fair chance Bolt, you were just ‘fairly’ awful at football You did get a fair chance Bolt, you were just ‘fairly’ awful at football

    Usain Bolt earned our undying admiration for his marvellous exploits on the track, but it was always clear, to be honest, that fumbling, bumbling, tumbling escapes on the football pitch, would never amount to anything more than a glorified publicity stunt.

    When fabled American sportscaster Charley Steiner quoted the famous line, uttered by Clint Eastwood’s iconic character Dirty Harry, ‘Sometimes a man’s got to know his limitations,’ he referred to another track and field legend, Carl Lewis, butchering the United States national anthem with all the ruthless efficacy of Sweeney Todd. 

    The laborious months of Bolt’s campaign to become a professional footballer may not have caused us to splutter uncontrollably with ceaseless bouts of irrepressible laughter, as Lewis’ spectacular failure did, mind you, what we saw were Bolt’s best parts, but the sentiment should be the same, everyone has limits.

    Shockingly, however, it seems the lesson has been lost on the decorated runner and his recent comments about not being given a fair chance to play football, tell us as much.

    Based on what I saw, and if there is better footage, I am eager to see it, it’s hard to justify the sprinter being given a trial anywhere at all where serious football is played.

    On one level, it’s completely understandable that unshakable self-belief is a key part of the mindset of any great athlete. 

    When Michael Jordan tossed aside the basketball and stood, bat in hand, in front of the mirror, he saw Jackie Robinson. When Carl Lewis decided to trade the relay baton for a mic, he likely glanced over to see Lionel Richie looking back, before committing an unforgiving and merciless verbal assault.  The shimmering reflection Bolt cast after putting down his spikes and picking up cleats was, Wayne Rooney, a player whom he astonishingly believed was at the same talent level.

    What is less understandable, however, is that three years after retirement and at least two after the professional football fiasco, the world record holder believes that his lack of success was down to a lack of opportunity.  It’s time to be honest, Usain, it was down to a glaring and obvious lack of ability.

    Football is a very easy sport to watch, easy to love, easy to have strong opinions about.  Some of us even believe it easy to play in our weekly treks to weekend scrimmage games. 

    The images we see when we stand proudly in front of the mirror, before heading to our own local battlefields are varied and endless.  Many of us are Lionel Messi’s, Cristiano Ronaldo’s, Jamie Vardy’s, Karim Benzema’s, and even Zinedine Zidane’s. If you really think about it though, playing well, let alone playing well enough to be a professional at the highest level, is another thing entirely.

    With the rare exception, the very best exponents of the beautiful game spend the tender years of their lives ceaselessly honing their craft, and even then, on many occasions, find themselves well short of making the professional-grade. 

    How likely was it that Bolt, then a 31-year-old athlete, who never even played the highest level of high school or primary school football, would decide to take up the sport professionally after a few scrimmage games and make the grade?  His only qualifier for getting a trial was that he held track and field sprint records. Fantastic records, mind you, but that is a remarkably clear case of comparing apples to oranges. 

    Come to think of it, the situation sounds rather ridiculous when you spell it out loud, doesn’t it?

    Well lest anyone out there harbour any illusions, it only sounds that way because the whole thing was.

       

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    as he struggled to

     

     

    In many respects Bolt and another track and field legend

    Bolt trippinCharkg over a football not as funny but breathtaking lack of aweness on limitations certainly in the same ballpark is just as not given chance ridiculous.  Football for year of training Bolt decided to pick it up as a professional at 31 declaring better than Wayne Rooney

    Beyond this Bolt now claims not given chance

  • Besiktas coach Yalcin has no interest in Balotelli Besiktas coach Yalcin has no interest in Balotelli

    Mario Balotelli looks to have no hope of a move to Besiktas after club president Ahmet Nur Cebi said the Italian is not wanted by coach Sergen Yalcin.

    The Turkish Super Lig giants were reported to have offered Balotelli a lucrative contract, with the striker likely to be on the move again after a turbulent first season with Brescia.

    Brescia president Massimo Cellino revealed in May he expected Balotelli to leave his hometown club at the end of the season as the 30-year-old "no longer has his head with us".

    Cellino's comments came following reports the former Italy frontman failed to attend training, claims which were denied by Balotellli before Brescia suffered relegation from Serie A.

    Cebi suggested Balotelli's name cropped up when transfer targets were discussed, but Yalcin does not want to take the former Manchester City man to Istanbul.

    Cebi, quoted widely by Turkish media, said: "Sergen Yalcin does not consider Mario Balotelli as one of his options for the striker position. He told me that.

    "Executives usually have initial talks with players and listen to them. This doesn't mean that a move is bound to happen.

    "We will make the signings Sergen Yalcin has asked of us but, I want to put it frankly, we will not compromise our financial situation."

    As well as Cellino's criticism of Balotelli, the Italy international was reported to have clashed with former head coach Fabio Grosso at Brescia's training ground in November.

    He was given permission to leave the club in January, only to stay put before the coronavirus pandemic caused the suspension of the season in March.

  • FA Cup replays scrapped for 2020-21 to ease fixture burden FA Cup replays scrapped for 2020-21 to ease fixture burden

    The Football Association has announced there will be no replays in the FA Cup next season.

    With the coronavirus pandemic having led to an adjusted schedule for 2020-21, the FA has taken the decision to scrap replays in order to ease the pressure on clubs.

    Qualification for England's major cup competition will begin on September 1, with the first round proper taking place in November.

    Premier League clubs will enter as usual in the third round, to be played in early January, with the final scheduled for May 15, 2021.

    The FA also announced that, after record prize funds for the last two seasons, the reward money has gone back to the level it was in 2017-18, due to the financial impact of COVID-19.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.