Rory Burns hailed a "beautiful" performance from Joe Root and was happy to get his own tempo right as both struck hundreds for England on day three of the second Test with New Zealand.

Burns hit only his second Test century as England fought back at Hamilton, while captain Root ended a long wait with his first ton in the five-day game since February.

Root's 17th Test hundred will ease the pressure on the under-pressure skipper, who has consistently faced questions over whether the burden of the captaincy was affecting his form.

He stood unbeaten on 114 but Burns was run out on 101, with England going on to lose the wickets of Ben Stokes and Zak Crawley before the close, leaving them on 269-5 in reply to New Zealand's 375.

Speaking to Sky Sports, Burns said of Root: "He played beautifully, to get himself back to where he wants to be, good Test match hundred and he's still in and still fighting away and hopefully he's going to make it a massive one.

"From a personal point I feel like I got my tempo right and managed to cash in."

On the run-out, when he was pushing for a second run, Burns added: "I thought I was just about there. I thought I had enough in the tank but didn't quite. That's disappointing to miss out in that way, it could have been a real big one."

England's prospects of winning the match and saving the two-game series appear to be slim, with the tourists facing the likelihood of needing to bat well into day four to gain a lead with which they could declare and then attempt to claim an innings victory.

Burns, however, remained hopeful, saying: "There's still a fair bit of batting there, it's about getting as far ahead of them as we can now and see what we can enforce."

An unbeaten century from Joe Root helped England stay in the second Test against New Zealand in Hamilton on Sunday.

Root (114 not out) guided England to 269-5 in response to the Black Caps' 375 at stumps on day three at Seddon Park.

The England captain scored his first Test century since February to give the tourists hope of salvaging a drawn series.

Rory Burns (101) also made a century after England had resumed in a precarious position at 39-2.

Burns and Root controlled the first session, although the latter needed a review when given out caught behind on 47, a delivery from debutant Daryl Mitchell (0-28) having hit his pad, not bat.

Burns was dropped on 10 on Saturday and he survived again on 86, Matt Henry (1-56) squandering a great run-out chance as the difficult day continued for New Zealand.

The England opener would reach his second Test ton before being run out thanks to excellent fielding by Jeet Raval.

England had battled through the second session as Ben Stokes (26) joined Root before the all-rounder edged Tim Southee (2-63) to Ross Taylor at slip.

Much to his relief, Root got to his 17th Test century thanks to an under-edge that went for four.

Zak Crawley, making his Test debut for England, only lasted six balls before edging behind to BJ Watling off Neil Wagner (1-76).

Rain meant the day was cut short with England back in the Test and hoping Root and Ollie Pope (4) can push them into a first-innings lead on Monday.

Gareth Southgate is relishing renewing acquaintances with Croatia after England were drawn to face the side that beat them in the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup at Euro 2020.

Mario Mandzukic's extra-time winner sent Zlatko Dalic's men through to the final in Russia at the expense of the Three Lions.

England gained a measure of revenge for that loss by edging out Croatia to reach last season's Nations League Finals.

They have since progressed to Euro 2020 courtesy of a free-scoring qualifying campaign with a youthful squad, although Southgate believes any suggestions Croatia's experienced generation led by Luka Modric and Ivan Rakitic is on the slide are premature.

"I thought that maybe 12 months ago but they recovered really well in their group," he told BBC Sport after having confirmation Croatia will be England's first opponents of the competition at Wembley on June 14.

"We know the quality of their midfield players when they can leave [Mateo] Kovacic on the bench.

"That tells you a story. That's a really top-level fixture."

A draw in Bucharest that placed holders Portugal, Germany and world champions France in the same Group F fell favourable for England, who will also take on the Czech Republic and the winner of the play-off path featuring Scotland, Israel, Norway and Serbia in Group D.

"There are eight to 10 top nations. If you look at the history of European Championships, there are so many different winners," Southgate said.

"A lot of teams prepare their squads for the World Cups, they rebuild after World Cups. The margins are really, really fine."

England hammered the Czech Republic 5-0 at Wembley in qualification, with Raheem Sterling scoring a hat-trick, but they were beaten 2-1 in the return fixture.

"We were very poor in Prague," Southgate conceded. "They've definitely improved. A new coach [Jaroslav Silhavy] has had time to bed in, a couple of younger players came into their squad.

"We know we have to be on our game. It won’t be like the first game at Wembley, that's for sure.

"If you can win and be top seeds, you've got to try and take control of your own destiny. We've got to be confident of our own ability and take on whoever comes."

The multi-host format of Euro 2020 means major-tournament football returns to England's national stadium for the first time since Southgate and his team-mates reached the semi-finals of the same competition in 1996.

"I just think that's going to be a brilliant experience for our fans and our public," he added.

"Ten nations have that opportunity so it doesn't make it an advantage in terms of winning the tournament unless we can get to the semi-finals [that take place at Wembley along with the final], which is then back in our favour.

"We're really looking forward to the experience."

The last three European winners of major tournaments will play in the same pool at Euro 2020, after France, Portugal and Germany were all drawn together

Germany and France - victors at the respective 2014 and 2018 World Cups - will take on reigning European champions Portugal and a play-off winner in Group G.

Croatia, runners-up at last year's World Cup, will renew acquaintances with England, the side they beat in the semi-finals.

Here is the draw in full for next year's event, with four places in the finals still to be determined by the four path-winners in March's play-offs.

 

Group A: Turkey, Italy, Wales, Switzerland

Group B: Denmark, Finland, Belgium, Russia.

Group C: Netherlands, Ukraine, Austria, play-off winner from Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) or Romania if they win Path A.

Group D: England, Croatia, Czech Republic, play-off winner from Path C (Scotland, Israel, Norway or Serbia)

Group E: Spain, Sweden, Poland, play-off winner from Path B (Slovakia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Northern Ireland or Republic of Ireland)

Group F: Germany, France, Portugal, play-off winner from Path A (Iceland, Bulgaria, Hungary) or winner of Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) if Romania win Path A.

Holders Portugal will face world champions France and fellow heavyweights Germany in a daunting Group F at Euro 2020.

Saturday's draw in Bucharest pitted Fernando Santos' men and their talismanic captain Cristiano Ronaldo against the winners of the two World Cups either side of their Euro 2016 triumph.

It means Didier Deschamps' Bleus will have an opportunity for revenge after Portugal beat them on home soil at the Stade de France to lift the trophy.

The nation with the dubious pleasure of joining them is still to be determined. Iceland, Bulgaria or Hungary would claim the fourth spot if they progress through their play-off route in Path A.

However, if Romania are victorious in Path A, they will go into Group C with Netherlands, Ukraine and Austria.

In permutations that underline the convoluted and criticised format, one of Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo from play-off Path B would enter Group F if Romania qualify. Otherwise, the winner of Path B goes into Group C.

Italy open the tournament, which will take place across 12 host cities, when they entertain Turkey in Rome on June 12. Wales and Switzerland are also in Group A.

England and Croatia renew acquaintances at Wembley in Group D – Gareth Southgate's men having been sunk by a Mario Mandzukic winner in the semi-finals of Russia 2018 before progressing to the Nations League Finals at the expense of Zlatko Dalic's team.

There is the possibility of an all-British encounter if Scotland prevail from their play-off path alongside Israel, Norway and Serbia, while Czech Republic will meet England again in the finals having traded victories with the Three Lions during qualification.

Group B is the second group not waiting to see how play-off cards fall, with the world's number-one ranked team Belgium lining up alongside Denmark, Finland and Russia.

Spain are aiming to make it three European titles in four attempts after securing glory in 2008 and 2012.

They head up Group C, where the winner of the play-off route including Bosnia-Herzegovina, Northern Ireland, Slovakia and the Republic of Ireland will round out the line-up alongside Sweden and Poland.

The Euro 2020 play-offs take place during next March's international break.

The last three European winners of major tournaments will play in the same pool at Euro 2020, after France, Portugal and Germany were all drawn together

Germany and France - victors at the respective 2014 and 2018 World Cups - will take on reigning European champions Portugal and a play-off winner in Group G.

Croatia, runners-up at last year's World Cup, will renew acquaintances with England, the side they beat in the semi-finals.

Here is the draw in full for next year's event, with four places in the finals still to be determined by the four path-winners in March's play-offs.

 

Group A: Turkey, Italy, Wales, Switzerland

Group B: Denmark, Finland, Belgium, Russia.

Group C: Netherlands, Ukraine, Austria, play-off winner from Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) or Romania if they win Path A.

Group D: England, Croatia, Czech Republic, play-off winner from Path C (Scotland, Israel, Norway or Serbia)

Group E: Spain, Sweden, Poland, play-off winner from Path B (Slovakia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Northern Ireland or Republic of Ireland)

Group F: Germany, France, Portugal, play-off winner from Path A (Iceland, Bulgaria, Hungary) or winner of Path D (Georgia, Belarus, North Macedonia or Kosovo) if Romania win Path A.

As Steve Smith rebuilt his reputation with an otherworldly performance in the 2019 Ashes, it was impossible to ignore the contrast between him and David Warner.

The disgraced duo, along with Cameron Bancroft, made their return to the Test arena following bans for their part in the 2018 ball-tampering scandal that rocked Australian cricket in the pressure cooker of an Ashes series in England.

While Smith was rightfully the recipient of widespread adoration as all of England and the rest of the cricketing world pondered the question "how do you get Steve Smith out?", Warner remained the pantomime villain and was unable to silence the jeers as he endured a miserable series.

Only twice did Warner go beyond single figures, with his highest score a 61 in the Headingley Test. His contribution to that incredible match long forgotten by the time Ben Stokes struck the four that completed one of the greatest fightbacks and most remarkable innings in Test history.

The redemption Smith enjoyed as he carried Australia in a series that saw them retain the urn was not forthcoming for Warner. He was excellent in the World Cup and finished as the second-highest run scorer but was unfortunate to achieve that feat in a tournament where Australia were emphatically beaten by an England side that prevailed in a final considered among the best games of all time.

Yet any Australian still bearing a grudge over Warner's indiscretions in South Africa must now surely grant him his absolution after an innings for the ages in the second Test with Pakistan.

Those inside the Adelaide Oval may have expected to see Australia pile on the runs. It was a fair assumption, given they closed day one on 302-1 with Warner on 166 and Marnus Labuschagne on 126.

However, few may have anticipated Warner etching his name into the history books and overtaking Don Bradman, the man many consider to be the best to play the game, with the highest ever score at the famous old ground. 

It may have come against a youthful Pakistan side able to harness much on a pitch offering little for the bowlers, but the exuberance and variety with which he attacked the challenge of becoming the seventh Australian to score 300 provided a wonderful encapsulation of his qualities as a batsman.

He was extremely fortunate to earn a reprieve as he slashed to gully from a Muhammad Musa no-ball on 234, but this was Warner at his free-flowing and aggressive best, and he celebrated reaching 200 and then 300 in typical fashion, bounding into the air with reckless abandon.

Warner racked up 39 fours and a singular six but he surpassed 334, the highest Test score of the legendary Bradman - one equalled by Mark Taylor against the same opposition in 1998 - in more sedate fashion, with a drive to sweeper cover for a single.

Taylor rose to applaud the achievement and captain Tim Paine promptly called for a declaration with Australia 589-3. Warner, perhaps recognising the magnitude of the occasion, left the field and bowed as he took in the acclaim of the Adelaide crowd.

There will be debate over whether Paine was right to declare with Warner in incredible form and well set to challenge Brian Lara's world-record score of 400. The skipper's call was vindicated in terms of the match situation, as Pakistan duly crumbled to 96-6.

Paine's decision and its merits are immaterial, though. Only Matthew Hayden stands above Warner on the list of highest individual scores by an Australian and, 20 months on from his lowest ebb, he can finally bask in his moment of redemption.

David Warner never believed he was "losing it " as a batsman during his miserable Ashes series.

The Australia opener etched his name into the history books on Saturday as he struck an unbeaten 335 in the second Test against Pakistan at the Adelaide Oval.

In the process he became the seventh Australian to record a triple-century and overtook the highest score by the great Don Bradman (334) with an incredible innings that featured 39 fours and a six.

Only Matthew Hayden stands above Warner on the list of highest Test scores by an Australian, with his Herculean effort coming after an away Ashes series in which he surpassed single figures just twice.

Asked in a media conference if he ever felt he was losing it during his miserable run in England, an amused Warner replied: "Nah, never, never losing it. What kind of question is that?

"At the end of the day, you're going to have people who doubt you and, to be honest, through that whole campaign in that series, I always said I wasn't out of form, I was out of runs.

"I say this, not just in hindsight, but if I had my time again, I would have not changed my guard, I wouldn't have listened to some external noises, I would have backed myself more and batted where I have been here, outside off, leaving the ball patiently, getting my bat and pad closer together and under my nose. And I am capable of that.

"I just think in England you can get caught up in playing too much in front, especially with the way that I play. So I've had to regroup coming back from England.

"I've probably hit over three and a half to four thousand balls in the nets leading into Brisbane. And obviously here as well I've batted for a good two hours per session. It's not by chance that I've actually tightened all that up. I've actually been working really hard in the nets.

"Look, I've never doubted myself at all. It's one of those things where I'm a very confident person. Whether or not I'd scored these runs or didn't score my runs, I'd still hold my head up high and have that little smirk on my face that I always have."

Despite his historic performance, Warner still indicated he can still make improvements in terms of his focus at the crease.

"I think the last two Tests, I said in the last press conference it's probably the best I've ever batted, the most disciplined I've ever batted and the most patient I've ever batted," he added. 

"I just felt at ease, especially batting with Marnus [Labuschagne]. We were really talking about the game and I think sometimes I get carried away with talking about where I'm looking to score instead of what the bowler is actually doing and how he's trying to get me out.

"I think that will stay in the back of my mind now moving forward."

New Zealand's score of 375 in the second and final Test was arguably "300 under par", according to England bowler Stuart Broad.

England endured a tough day in the field at Hamilton's Seddon Park as a sixth-wicket partnership of 124 between BJ Watling and Daryl Mitchell frustrated them after two wickets fell in the morning session.

Broad finally ended their stand, removing each batsman within the space of four overs, though New Zealand's tail wagged and cameos from Mitchell Santner (23) and Tim Southee (18) added valuable runs.

New Zealand's hopes of clinching the two-match series 2-0 were furthered when England lost Dom Sibley and Joe Denly cheaply in their 18 overs before the close. Rory Burns and Joe Root reached stumps with England 39-2.

The Black Caps won the first Test by an innings and 65 runs on the back of a score of 615-9, and Broad believes their failure to do the same again on a batting-friendly surface means England are in a decent position.

"We won the toss and bowled – not to bowl New Zealand out for 150, we were aiming [to dismiss them] for 330-350 and then bat big once to try and win the game," said Broad.

"We thought our best chance to take 20 wickets in five days was by bowling first.

"These pitches, you've got to change your mindset a little bit. If you win the toss and bowl in England and concede 370 you'd be distraught, but here the opportunity is to bat big and bat big once.

"For us to win this game, we'll need a batter to get 150 plus, and someone else to get 100, and leave ourselves a day to bowl them out on day five. That's how New Zealand won the last test they played [in Hamilton], when they got [715]-6. So arguably, they're 300 under par.

"When you come away from home you look at what the opposition do in their home conditions – and New Zealand bowl. It's pretty rare that they win the toss and bat.

"It will be proven if it was a good decision tomorrow [Sunday] really – if we bat through the whole of tomorrow and go past New Zealand, we can apply some pressure on them in the second innings. If we don't go and get 400, we can't.

"I think our opportunity is there tomorrow. There's not a huge amount of pressure, there's not a lot happening in the pitch, there's not a big scoreboard pressure – there's a chance for a couple of people to get hundreds tomorrow.

"We need someone to go and get a big hundred for us to win this game – and we've got the players to do it."

England were left in trouble after losing a pair of wickets late on day two of the second Test against New Zealand on Saturday.

The Black Caps were bowled out for 375 in their first innings after something of a collapse at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

Debutant Daryl Mitchell (73) and BJ Watling (55) guided New Zealand after Tom Latham's century, but the hosts – who lead the two-Test series 1-0 – lost their final five wickets for just 60.

Stuart Broad (4-73) was the pick of the bowlers but, just as England seemed boosted by that strong finish, the Black Caps hit back.

Dom Sibley (4) and Joe Denly (4) fell before stumps, leaving England at 39-2 and still trailing by 336 runs with Rory Burns (24) and Joe Root (6) unbeaten.

Sibley had been hit in the helmet by Tim Southee (1-24) before falling to the paceman, who trapped him lbw.

Burns was given a life on 10 as Ross Taylor put down a catch at first slip off Matt Henry.

But New Zealand would strike again, Watling diving low to his right to remove Denly off Henry (1-10) to cap a fine day for the hosts.

Earlier, England had made a fine start to day two as Latham (105) and Henry Nicholls (16) – the overnight batsmen – departed early.

But Mitchell and Watling led the response for New Zealand, putting together a 124-run partnership as they frustrated the tourists.

The Black Caps scored just 67 runs during the second session, although the departure of Watling – removed by a great Broad bouncer – just before tea triggered a collapse of sorts.

England managed to contain New Zealand to 375, but the fall of Sibley and Denly has left them on the back foot.

Gareth Southgate has challenged England to "improve to another level" and mount a serious challenge for Euro 2020.

Southgate led the Three Lions on a surprise run to the semi-finals of the 2018 World Cup in Russia, where little was expected of a team that had spent the previous decade under-achieving on the biggest stages.

England followed their best major tournament showing of the 21st century with another semi-final berth, this time in the inaugural Nations League.

A functional team have been enhanced by exciting youngsters such as Jadon Sancho, while Raheem Sterling's goal return for his country is now akin to what he produced in back-to-back Premier League triumphs with Manchester City.

Add in the factor that the semi-finals and finals of a pan-continental Euro 2020 will take place at Wembley and there is mounting enthusiasm around England's prospects ahead of Saturday's group-stage draw.

Although he does not wish to dissuade this after a free-scoring qualification campaign, Southgate told BBC Sport he sees room for improvement.

"I think we've gained some respect and I think people would view us as a threat, which certainly wasn't the case ahead of Russia," he said.

"We also know we have got to improve to another level.

"It's hard to assess exactly where we are after this qualifying campaign.

"But if we look at a World Cup semi-final, a Nations League semi-final, and qualifying with the most goals in Europe, we have done all we can and we are on a good track."

He added: "In terms of consistency of performance, we are [close to the top teams]. Nobody else got to the World Cup semi-finals and the latter stages of the Nations League.

"So we are in that mix of teams, but there are lot of good teams and the difference on one day between any of the top 10 teams is so marginal in football."

Southgate was linked to the recent vacancy at Tottenham but feels no need to place his focus elsewhere, with planning for the Qatar 2022 World Cup also on the agenda.

"I haven't planned anything in my managerial career," said the former Middlesbrough and England Under-21 boss. "None of the jobs that I've taken were a reality in my mind until about 48 hours before they happened.

"I love the job I'm doing, we have an exciting team which continues to improve. At every team you work with, there maybe comes a moment when the fans or the players have had enough of you and that's probably the time to go. I don't sense that at the moment."

Harlequins will be without Mike Brown for the rest of the Premiership season, with the England international to undergo surgery on a knee injury.

Full-back Brown, who has won 72 caps for England and made over 300 appearances for Harlequins, is expected to be out for between "six to nine months".

The 34-year-old was left out of England's squad for the Rugby World Cup as Eddie Jones' side made it to the final in Japan, where they were defeated by South Africa.

"Losing Mike is a big loss. He's tried hard to train and play over the past few weeks," Harlequins' head of rugby Paul Gustard said.

"Unfortunately his situation worsened, and it would be damaging to his long-term knee health to try and play."

Brown has played five times for Harlequins this term, having initially sustained the knee issue in pre-season.

Chris Woakes fears England may not be able to call upon Ben Stokes to bowl in the remainder of the second Test against New Zealand but hopes to have the "world class" all-rounder at "full tilt".

Stokes complained of an issue with his left knee, on which he had surgery in 2016 and has continued to be troubled by, after completing his second over in Hamilton on day one.

Tom Latham was unbeaten on 101 and the Black Caps – who lead the two-Test series 1-0 – were 173-3 when rain brought an early end to play after tea.

Stokes will reportedly undergo an assessment to determine whether he will be fit to bowl again in the match.

"Ben's overs are not just a bonus, he's a world-class bowler when he's at his best. Of course we'll move his overs, whether he can bowl or not I don't know," said the recalled Woakes, who claimed the big scalps of Kane Williamson and Ross Taylor.

"He's obviously got a bit of pain in that left knee, I don't know exactly what it is but of course we want a Ben Stokes at full tilt if we can because he's world class.

"Ben is one of the hardest trainers and works hard on his fitness and everything. Hopefully we can get that right. The medical team will be working really hard to do that.

"There's a bit of a gap between the end of this Test match and the start of the South Africa one so hopefully [they can] get him as close to 100 per cent as possible."

Latham made the most of a reprieve on 66, having been put down by a diving Stokes in the slips, to register a fifth hundred in his past 10 Test innings.

"Ben, in particular, is probably the hardest trainer I've ever seen, particularly when it comes to his fielding and his catching," Woakes said.

"It's just the way it goes. Unfortunately we've put a couple down and it's hurt us, hopefully this one won't hurt us quite as badly as the last one did."

Robert Pires hopes France are paired with a reinvigorated and "motivated" England in the Euro 2020 group stage.

Both sides finished top of their qualifying groups to get their name in the hat for Saturday's draw in Bucharest.

England will host a total of seven matches in next year's finals and are in Pot 1, while France - despite being world champions - are in Pot 2.

Former Arsenal winger Pires would like to see his native France face off against Gareth Southgate's side, who he believes will be a big threat in the tournament.

"What's for sure is that we're going to draw a big team because unfortunately we're in Pot 2," he told Omnisport, speaking as part of the UEFA Champions League Trophy Tour driven by Nissan.

"Which one I would like to play against? France-England would be nice. 

"I think that we're strong but the English are having a renaissance and Southgate has built a good team, quite young, with a bit of experience and they can be a good surprise during the next Euros. 

"And as you know the final is in London so they will be motivated."

One team Pires is eager for France to avoid is Spain, who qualified for the competition with an unbeaten record that sets them out among the favourites.

"The team to avoid is always Spain," added Pires, who won the World Cup and European Championship during his playing days.

"They remain very strong, they're very skilled and they cause problems to us every time."

Former Italy head coach Conor O'Shea will join the Rugby Football Union (RFU) as director of performance in 2020.

O'Shea this month resigned as Italy boss, having failed to guide the Azzurri out of a difficult Rugby World Cup group that included New Zealand and eventual champions South Africa.

The Irishman's impeding arrival was confirmed after the RFU announced director of professional rugby Nigel Melville will leave the organisation in December.

O'Shea is to work closely with Eddie Jones and will be responsible for the leadership, management and strategic direction of the professional game in England.

"I am privileged and honoured and it is an incredible opportunity to join at a really exciting time for English rugby," said O'Shea.

"I've spent the last four years in Italy, six years at Harlequins and before that 10 years at London Irish, so I feel I know the system pretty well. The good times, the bad times, winning things and being competitive, so I can relate to the people and challenges that happen within our system. I have learned a huge amount internationally in the last few years as well.

"There is an exciting vision at the RFU. It is not just about winning tomorrow, but also about sustaining success and winning long into the future. We can really look forward to rejuvenating and re-energising the performance pathway to help, support and push England rugby on."

RFU CEO Bill Sweeney added: "Conor knows Eddie Jones very well and will be able to integrate with what is happening at the highest level on the elite side of our game and making sure we have a seamless approach to player and coach development will be key.

"He will also work closely with Premiership Rugby and the clubs to make sure we have the right relationships with them.

"There is a lot happening. We are just coming off a very successful Rugby World Cup, the youngest-ever team to compete in a World Cup final so it bodes really well for us going forward.

"We are looking forward to the Six Nations coming up now but that is part of a longer journey through to France in 2023. We look at that and the experience of Japan and that is something we can really build on."

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