Bayern Munich will not exercise their option to sign James Rodriguez on a permanent deal, chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge has confirmed.

The Colombia international has spent the past two seasons on loan at the Allianz Arena from Real Madrid, winning two Bundesliga titles and a DFB-Pokal.

Bayern reportedly had the option to sign James for €42million and Rummenigge claimed as recently as March that the club were hopeful of making his transfer permanent.

However, it has now been revealed that will not be the case, with James having told Bayern he did not wish to stay.

Rummenigge told Sport 1: "In principle, the decision was made because he [James] came to me before the end of the season and asked me not to activate the option.

"His agent [Jorge Mendes] also called me again last week. Activating the option now against his will makes no sense.

"You should not hire a player for €42million with an appropriate salary if you cannot offer him a firm position."

James has been linked with a switch to Napoli and a reunion with his former Madrid boss Carlo Ancelotti, the man who brought him to Munich.

He scored 14 Bundesliga goals in 43 appearances for Bayern and Rummenigge said the club's decision is not a reflection on his quality.

"I've always said that I'm a fan of his game culture. His left foot is exceptional, his scoring also," he added. 

"He was a high-quality player [for Bayern]."

Bayern Munich legend Franz Beckenbauer spoke of his desire to one day see Jurgen Klopp take over as head coach at the Allianz Arena.

Klopp's reputation as one of the world's best coaches was enhanced further after he guided Liverpool to Champions League glory in a 2-0 win over Tottenham on Saturday.

En route to the final in Madrid, Klopp's side defeated Bayern in the last 16 and Beckenbauer stated his admiration for the former Borussia Dortmund boss after that tie.

And Beckenbauer, who represented Die Roten as a player and coach, is eager to see Klopp return to Germany in the future with Bayern.

"I wish for nothing more than that one day he will come to Bayern," he told Bild.

"That would fit... for me he is one of the world's best coaches. What he started in Dortmund he has refined with Liverpool."

Beckenbauer also expressed his belief that managing a team in the Premier League is more difficult than in the Bundesliga.

"I think a job in England is going to rob you of your strength," he added.

"You have even more responsibility as a so-called manager at a Premier League club than a coach in the Bundesliga."

Franck Ribery looks unlikely to move to Australia's A-League after Western Sydney Wanderers coach Markus Babbel accepted the Frenchman is too expensive for them.

Ribery played his last match for Bayern Munich in the 3-0 DFB-Pokal final win over RB Leipzig last week, bringing his 12-year stay to a close.

The 36-year-old has no plans to retire, however, and he is open to offers, recently suggesting a move to Sydney to link up with former Bayern defender Babbel was a possibility.

Babbel has tried to make that a reality, though he now accepts it is unrealistic having discussed the potential move with his club's chairman.

"The current state is such that we cannot afford him," Babbel told Sky Germany. "I've had a long talk with our chairman and unfortunately he's not ready to go that deep.

"But the door is still open. If he wants to lead a beautiful life, even with his family, he would have absolute peace and serenity with us.

"Australia would be the perfect place for that. You live in one of the most beautiful cities in the world and have a fantastic lifestyle.

"From a footballing point of view, of course, he would be the rock star here. Some of my players would probably be frozen in awe, but the whole Ribery package is not affordable for us right now."

Jadon Sancho is guaranteed to stay at Borussia Dortmund for next season, according to CEO Hans-Joachim Watzke.

England winger Sancho has been heavily linked with Manchester United after a standout 2018-19 in the Bundesliga, in which he registered 12 goals and 14 assists in 34 appearances.

Dortmund have always maintained they do not intend to sell the 19-year-old, though, and Watzke has made it clear Sancho is not on the market.

"It can be assumed that Jadon will not play more than 10 years at BVB," he said to Bild. "But we have clear agreements about the present. Jadon is not on the market and he plays next season at Borussia Dortmund, guaranteed."

Dortmund, who missed out on the league title to Bayern Munich by two points, have wasted little time in strengthening their squad.

Deals for Julian Brandt, Thorgan Hazard and Nico Schulz have all been confirmed in the past week, with the majority of the outlay funded by Christian Pulisic's move to Chelsea.

"If you look at the transfer fees, you see that we were not wasteful: we got around 64million euros for Christian Pulisic and invested about 10million euros net in the three new signings," said Watzke.

"We turned one into three. My big compliment goes to our sporting director Michael Zorc."

Next up among Dortmund's priorities is to extend the contracts of head coach Lucien Favre and midfielder Mario Gotze, with Watzke saying: "I feel they both feel very well. We will deal with these two topics in the next few weeks. We want to extend with both.

"With the runner-up spot, he [Favre] achieved more than we expected. He has finally given the team a clear style of play again. Lucien is the right person for Dortmund. In the second and third year, it will become clear whether we can collect titles together."

Champions Bayern have also made significant moves in the market, spending a reported €118m on deals for Lucas Hernandez, Benjamin Pavard and 19-year-old Jann-Fiete Arp.

They are also interested in Manchester City's Leroy Sane, something Watzke says he would be happy to see.

"I think it would be very good if Bayern bring Leroy Sane back as a German national player, because that would increase the appeal of the league. I would be the first to congratulate them," he added.

Manchester United's finest hour in the modern era saw them come from behind to beat Bayern Munich 2-1 in the 1998-99 Champions League final and Sunday marks the 20th anniversary of that momentous day.

Alex Ferguson's United had an immensely difficult run en route to the final, having faced Bayern and Barcelona in the group stage, before then eliminating Inter and Juventus in the knockout phase.

Bayern – who faced rather more modest opposition in Kaiserslautern and Dynamo Kiev before the final – found themselves ahead after just six minutes, with Mario Basler's free-kick finding the bottom-right corner.

The Germans had the better of things and looked to be heading for the title, but in the first minute of stoppage time Teddy Sheringham turned Ryan Giggs' scuffed shot in from close range.

Two minutes later, United secured their remarkable turnaround – Sheringham nodded on a David Beckham corner and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer prodded home the most famous goal in the club's history.

On the 20th anniversary, we've looked back at the teams on display that day and investigated what they are up to in 2019…

MANCHESTER UNITED

Peter Schmeichel

Since hanging up his gloves, Schmeichel has remained a prominent media personality, appearing as a pundit for many major broadcasters. In December he declared his interest in the director of football role at United, though nothing more has been heard on that front since.

Gary Neville

After a poor stint as Valencia coach came to abrupt end in 2016, Gary Neville returned to his role as a leading pundit on Sky Sports in England. He is also a part-owner – with fellow 'Class of '92' graduates Phil Neville, Giggs, Paul Scholes, Nicky Butt and Beckham – of Salford City, a club who recently earned promotion to League Two.

Ronny Johnsen

Norwegian Johnsen has worked as a television pundit in his homeland, while he is also a United ambassador, often travelling to events around the globe and representing the club.

Jaap Stam

In his day, Stam was one of the finest centre-backs and he has also shown signs of promise as a coach. After being sacked by Reading last year, he returned to Netherlands and took over PEC Zwolle in December. He seemingly did enough in his first four months to convince Feyenoord, who announced in March that Stam will replace departing coach Giovanni van Bronckhorst in June.

Denis Irwin

One of the real unsung heroes of the treble-winning side, Irwin probably isn't considered as much of a 'great' as he should because of his quiet, unassuming nature. As such, perhaps it's no surprise he did not go into coaching, though he has made regular appearances on United's TV channel, worked for Irish broadcasters and written a column for a newspaper.

Ryan Giggs

A brief stint as interim manager of United after David Moyes was sacked in 2014 opened the door to Giggs' coaching career. He served as assistant to Louis van Gaal during his two-year spell as boss, before taking charge of Wales' senior side last year, which he juggles with his Salford responsibilities.

David Beckham

Given his celebrity-like off-field life as a player, it's probably no surprise Beckham never went into management. A philanthropist and investor, the former England star is more businessman than sportsman these days, though he is joint owner of Inter Miami, a club expected to play in MLS from 2020.

Nicky Butt

Having worked as a youth coach after halting his playing days, Butt was hired as the head of United's academy in 2016, overseeing the development of some talented players, such as James Garner, Mason Greenwood, Angel Gomes and Tahith Chong.

Jesper Blomqvist

Another who has done a bit of TV work, but Blomqvist's post-football life is otherwise significantly different to many of his former colleagues – he now runs a pizzeria near Stockholm.

Dwight Yorke

Ambition certainly isn't something Yorke lacks, as he put himself forward for the Aston Villa job last October, though he was unsuccessful, probably because his only coaching experience was a stint as Trinidad and Tobago assistant manager a decade ago.

Andy Cole

Although Cole has trained to become a coach and briefly worked for Milton Keynes Dons, Huddersfield Town and United, that side of his career is yet to take off, partly down to health issues, having had to have a kidney transplant in April 2017.

Substitutes:

Teddy Sheringham

Great players don't always amount to top managers, which is surely relevant for Sheringham. The former striker was praised for his impact on West Ham's forwards during a stint as an attacking coach but lasted less than a year in his first management position at Stevenage. Similarly, he was in charge of Indian side ATK for six months last season before being sacked.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer

Introduced as a substitute who saved the day in 1999, Solskjaer finds himself in a comparable position 20 years later. After a successful interim period as Jose Mourinho's replacement, he was hired on a full-time basis as United manager in March, but poor results ever since have seen that decision called into question. Can he lead another turnaround at the club? Only time will tell.

 

BAYERN MUNICH

Oliver Kahn

One of the most iconic players – not just goalkeepers – of his generation, Kahn is also having a pretty successful 'retirement'. Still rocking his trademark blond locks, the 49-year-old is an entrepreneur and businessman, pundit and seemingly in line for a major backroom role at Bayern in the future, with reports suggesting he will take over as president once Uli Hoeness decides he has had enough.

Markus Babbel

Babbel's management career began brightly, as he presided over part of Stuttgart's Bundesliga title challenge in 2008-09. However, aside from a successful promotion campaign with Hertha Berlin two years later, there has been little to get excited about. Having also coached Hoffenheim and Luzern in Switzerland, the former defender made the switch to Western Sydney Wanderers in the A-League last year. They finished the season eighth in the 10-team division.

Thomas Linke

Instead of coaching, Linke opted to pursue more management-based roles after ending his playing career. He briefly served as sporting director at RB Leipzig in 2011 before resigning for personal reasons. Later that year he joined Ingolstadt, and under his guidance the club earned promotion in 2014-15. Relegation two years later brought his resignation, but he returned in November for the rest of the season.

Lothar Matthaus

Coaching has seen Matthaus embark on an intriguing post-playing career, managing Rapid Vienna, Partizan Belgrade, Hungary, Atletico Paranaense, Red Bull Salzburg, Maccabi Netanya and Bulgaria. None of them were particularly successful, however, and he mostly seen working as a pundit on German television these days.

Sammy Kuffour

It is fair to say Kuffour's career since retiring has been rather less nomadic than Matthaus'. Media appearances in his native Ghana have been regular, while he is now on the Ghanaian Football Association's 'normalisation committee', having been appointed after FIFA disbanded their executive committee last year following allegations of misconduct.

Michael Tarnat

Tarnat returned to Bayern after retirement, becoming a talent scout and prominent academy coach for the best part of seven years. In 2017 he went back to another of his former clubs, Hannover, where he is the head of the youth development side of things.

Stefan Effenberg

Known for his on-field aggression, Effenberg is – perhaps predictably – somewhat infamous for his controversial opinions and brutal honesty as a pundit and columnist. His only venture in management came in 2015-16 with Paderborn, but he was sacked after only five months at the helm. The former midfielder is also a banker.

Jens Jeremies

Battling midfielder Jeremies opted against taking his terrier-like attitude into management or coaching. Instead, he has worked as a player agent and run his own charity.

Mario Basler

As a player, Basler was as divisive as they come. Rarely shy about his penchant for drinking and smoking, he seemed to fall out with almost everyone. Judging by that reputations, his new career as a stand-up comedian is seemingly rather more suitable to him than management, which he had little success with.

Carsten Jancker

After learning his trade with SC Neusiedl and Rapid Vienna, Jancker took his first head coach job at SV Horn, another Austrian club, in June 2017. Nevertheless, he was dismissed in November last year and is yet to take up another position elsewhere.

Alexander Zickler

Like his former strike partner, Zickler went to Austria to cut his teeth in the coaching field, working at Red Bull Salzburg for seven years. That stay is set to come to an end soon, as the former Germany international is to follow the club's first-team coach Marco Rose to Borussia Monchengladbach.

Substitutes:

Mehmet Scholl

Bayern icon Scholl spent the first few years post-retirement working with the club's youth teams and reserve side, with whom he enjoyed two spells. But, since quitting in 2013, he has been focusing on punditry and media work.

Thorsten Fink

A fairly prominent management career followed Fink's playing days, with Ingolstadt, Basel, Hamburg and APOEL among those he has managed. His most recent job was at Grasshoppers Zurich, but that ended poorly as he was sacked in March and Switzerland's most successful club were ultimately relegated at the end of the season.

Hasan Salihamidzic

Salihamidzic is once again an important figure at Bayern. The former winger is now sporting director and has been praised in recent times for his work in that domain, with the club particularly looking towards younger players.

Niko Kovac will be staying on as Bayern Munich coach, club chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge has confirmed.

Kovac guided Bayern to their first DFB-Pokal title since 2016 on Saturday, as a double from Robert Lewandowski and a sublime Kingsley Coman strike saw off RB Leipzig 3-0.

Rummenigge insisted on Friday that Kovac's future was not in doubt, regardless of whether or not Bayern succeeded in Berlin, and he has now reaffirmed that stance.

"Of course, Niko remains coach, that has never been the subject of discussion," Rummenigge told Fox Sports. 

"We have never questioned that. It is about winning prizes, that counts at Bayern Munich. And the coach plays a central role in this.

"For us, it has never been in doubt whether he would continue as the coach. The team was formidable today."

With the victory, Kovac has become the first coach to win back-to-back DFB-Pokal titles, following Eintracht Frankfurt's win over Bayern in the 2017-18 final.

"I'm obviously very happy," he told a news conference. "Leipzig made it very difficult for us and didn’t give us much space.

"But as time went on we found it easier. I would like to congratulate Manuel Neuer, especially, for his sensational performance."

Franck Ribery hailed the DFB-Pokal final win over RB Leipzig as the perfect way to end his Bayern Munich career.

Robert Lewandowski's brace, either side of a blistering finish from Kingsley Coman, saw Bayern see off Leipzig 3-0 in Berlin on Saturday.

Having bid farewell to the Allianz Arena with a goal in Bayern's victory over Eintracht Frankfurt last time out, Ribery - who along with Arjen Robben and Rafinha will now leave the club - came on from the bench as Niko Kovac's side secured a domestic double.

And the 36-year-old acknowledged that the triumph was a bittersweet way to call time on his 12-year stint at Bayern.

"I'm just happy," Ribery said. "This is how I imagined it to be, winning this title in the end.

"I am very proud of the performance today, of the whole team. 

"Of course I am a bit sad that these years at Bayern have ended. Even when I was sitting on the bench, I was quite emotional watching them play.

"I was happy to be a part of it one last time."

Leipzig, playing in their first major final, started well, with Manuel Neuer making a brilliant save to deny Yussuf Poulsen an opener before Lewandowski's exceptional header put Bayern ahead in the 29th minute.

Neuer made another vital stop early in the second half from Emil Forsberg, with Timo Werner also having an effort cleared off the line.

Bayern made their good fortune count and, after Coman had hammered home, Lewandowski rounded off the win with a delicate lob.

"Of course it is disappointing," said Leipzig forward Poulsen.

"I think we played a good game all over. We were the best team in the first half but didn't take our chances, and you're going to lose if you don't take the chances that we created.

"They have to be glad that they have a good goalkeeper. The first half an hour we were really good. There will be a moment to be proud, but not today."

Robert Lewandowski's double and a thumping finish from Kingsley Coman ensured Bayern Munich beat RB Leipzig 3-0 to win the DFB-Pokal and complete a domestic double in Niko Kovac's first season.

Having secured a seventh straight Bundesliga title last time out, Bayern went ahead against a resilient Leipzig - featuring in their first ever major final - thanks to Lewandowski's wonderful 29th-minute header.

Things would have been different if not for Bayern goalkeeper Manuel Neuer, who on his return from injury pulled off a pair of fantastic stops to deny Yussuf Poulsen and Emil Forsberg.

Thiago Alcantara passed up a golden chance to extend the lead, but his miss mattered little as Coman made sure of Bayern's first domestic double in three years before Lewandowski's delicate chip rounded off a fine day for Kovac's side.

Franck Ribery and Arjen Robben have been named on Bayern Munich's bench for the DFB-Pokal final against RB Leipzig, with Manuel Neuer starting.

Long-serving duo Ribery and Robben came on as substitutes against Eintracht Frankfurt in their final Bundesliga appearances for Bayern last time out, both scoring in a 5-1 win that sealed a seventh-successive league crown.

And both players will again begin among the replacements on Saturday in what is their farewell Bayern game, head coach Niko Kovac sticking with Kingsley Coman and Serge Gnabry.

They are joined on the bench by Rafinha, who is also calling time on his Bayern career after the clash at the Olympiastadion.

Another Bayern stalwart, Neuer, does start, after he returned from injury against Eintracht, with Kovac making just one alteration to his XI - the injured Leon Goretzka making way for Javi Martinez.

Leipzig drew 0-0 with Bayern in the penultimate Bundesliga fixture of the season, and Ralf Rangnick has made two changes from his starting XI in that fixture, with Tyler Adams and Kevin Kampl coming in for Diego Demme and Konrad Laimer.

Bayern Munich goalkeeper Manuel Neuer will return from six weeks out injured to start the DFB-Pokal final against RB Leipzig on Saturday, Niko Kovac has confirmed.

Neuer was substituted in the second half of the 4-1 Bundesliga victory over Fortuna Dusseldorf on April 14 after aggravating an existing calf issue.

The captain was initially ruled out for two weeks but has not played since, with Bayern keen not to rush him back into action.

However, Neuer trained this week and Kovac revealed the World Cup winner will be back between the posts against Leipzig in Berlin.

"I can say Manuel will play," the coach told a news conference on Friday. "He is our captain and has done well this season. He is a cornerstone of our team."

Saturday's match will be the last opportunity for departing stars Rafinha, Franck Ribery and Arjen Robben to feature for Bayern.

However, Kovac insists he cannot allow that to play into his thinking when it comes to team selection.

He said: "It will be the last competitive match for these three top players, but we have a very difficult task - as we did against Eintracht Frankfurt [in the Bundesliga last weekend].

"It will be a very difficult decision for me, because I know how hard it is. But we have players who did a great job in the second half of the season, so I have to give them the confidence that they deserve.

"I can only choose 11 players, but everything is possible [on Saturday]. Everyone can play - even the three that are leaving Bayern."

Kovac and Bayern CEO Karl-Heinz Rummenigge have insisted he will remain as coach next season, yet the former Frankfurt boss was not willing to discuss his future.

"We have a cup final ahead of us," he said. "We should talk about football. I want to throw all my energy into the team and the job. My future is secondary."

Niko Kovac's role at Bayern Munich is not in doubt as he has been a success this season, says executive board chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge.

Former Eintracht Frankfurt coach Kovac took over at Bayern at the start of the campaign and, after a slow start, held off Borussia Dortmund to clinch the Bundesliga title on the final day.

There was disappointment in a Champions League last-16 defeat to Liverpool, but Bayern are also in the DFB-Pokal final against RB Leipzig on Saturday.

And despite speculation that Kovac is under pressure at the Allianz Arena, Rummenigge is confident there will be no change in the dugout regardless of this weekend's result.

"It would be crazy to make the future dependent on one game," said Rummenigge, speaking at the Bild 100 Sport summit on Friday.

"We [he and Kovac] have no problem with each other - it's all straightforward. Nobody is questioning that he will be our coach next season.

"I think that if you coach [like this] in Bavaria in the first year, that is certainly a success. He is a young, relatively inexperienced coach."

Rummenigge previously described a report claiming Kovac was on the brink of being sacked as "a total hoax".

Speaking after defending the Bundesliga title, Kovac told Sky he was "convinced" he would remain in place as Bayern head coach.

RB Leipzig have a chance to collect the first major silverware of the club's brief history when they face Bayern Munich in Saturday's DFB-Pokal final.

Much has been written about the club's ownership status and how the backing of drinks company Red Bull has fuelled their rise, but on the pitch there is much to admire about Leipzig.

Despite ending the league campaign with a slump of three winless matches, Leipzig secured a Champions League return by finished third in the Bundesliga, albeit some 12 points behind champions Bayern.

Niko Kovac has the double in his sights in his first season in charge of the Bavarian giants, even if victory in Berlin may not be enough to keep his job. And Leipzig will be tough opponents, though the final will be a new experience for many of them.

Much of their progress has been down to the steady leadership of Ralf Rangnick, who will be in the dugout for the final time of his second spell in charge.

Hoffenheim's Julian Nagelsmann, one of the world's most exciting young coaches, is set to take over with Rangnick moving upstairs into a director of football role once more.

It was Rangnick who was at the helm when Leipzig were promoted to the Bundesliga in the 2015-16 season, writing an important chapter for the new kids on the block.

"I think not one of our team [has played] in a cup final," he told reporters after the 3-1 semi-final victory at Hamburg.

Leipzig were only formed in 2009. Red Bull, who also run Salzburg - Austrian champions six years running - took over SSV Markranstadt and controversially rebranded the club, whose progress since has been rapid.

Put simply, they have achieved what nobody else has in the history of German football, eclipsing some of the country's traditional powerhouses to take a seat at the game's top table.

Borussia Dortmund supporters are among those to have protested against Leipzig's sudden appearance among the elite, while the club's interpretation of German football's vaunted 50+1 rule regarding ownership structures has invited criticism.

Set against Dortmund's 139,000 members holding the majority of club voting rights on matters such as ticket prices, Leipzig have 17 members and charge an annual feel of €1,000 for the privilege – leading to accusations that they sign up to the letter of the law but not the spirit.

But Leipzig are not the first German club to have been bolstered by big money. Bayer Leverkusen have intrinsic ties to the Bayer pharmaceutical company, Wolfsburg are closely associated with car giant Volkswagen and Hoffenheim are backed by software billionaire Dietmar Hopp.

That Leipzig have little history to speak of is not in doubt, but the future of the club looks incredibly bright and it is no exaggeration to suggest they could be the most likely pretenders to Bayern's throne, despite Dortmund's near-miss in the title race and impressive early work in the transfer window.

What is for certain is nobody at Bayern will be taking anything for granted when they face Leipzig with the DFB-Pokal on the line. Germany winger Serge Gnabry, whose fine form has made him a vital player for club and country this season, expects Leipzig's rise to continue in the near future.

"Leipzig have always been in the top four in the Bundesliga the last four years," Gnabry, who played under Nagelsmann while on loan at Hoffenheim last season, told DAZN. "Now they will be getting a new coach and new players. Nagelsmann is a fanatic and that [will transfer] to his players. They always want to become better, so I think Leipzig will be a big player in years to come."

How Bayern approach Leipzig muscling in on their territory will be interesting. They have traditionally cherry-picked the star players of their closest rivals, taking Leon Goretzka from Schalke last year - they subsequently plummeted down the league - while two of their most important players, Mats Hummels and Robert Lewandowski, built their careers and reputations with BVB.

It is Leipzig striker Timo Werner who Bayern are said to have an eye on next, with Gnabry's Germany team-mate only having a year left to run on his contract at the Red Bull Arena. Bayern are set for a lavish revamp, having already landed defensive duo Benjamin Pavard and Lucas Hernandez.

Leipzig have signalled they will not keep Werner and risk losing him for nothing in 2020, so the club have been put in a difficult position. They may need to sell Werner, but will not want to lose the player to a direct rival. Champions League finalists Liverpool are also reportedly keen, having already signed Naby Keita last year.

Whether or not the DFB-Pokal final proves Werner's last game for his current employers remains to be seen, but the striker may yet fire Leipzig to their first major trophy. Despite what opposition fans may think about the club, it could be the first of many.

Manchester City winger Leroy Sane is a target for Bundesliga champions Bayern Munich, club president Uli Hoeness has confirmed.

The 23-year-old has shone since moving to the Etihad Stadium from Schalke three years ago, but found himself down the pecking order towards the end of the Premier League season.

Bayern are in the market for reinforcements on the flanks, with Franck Ribery and Arjen Robben both drawing a curtain on their illustrious careers at the Allianz Arena at the end of the campaign.

Speculation has increased over the previous few weeks that they were looking to Germany international Sane as a potential signing.

 

From us all at #FCBayern, DANKE! @R13_official @FranckRibery@ArjenRobben pic.twitter.com/cl9KG92soi

— #MEIS7ER (@FCBayernEN) May 23, 2019

When asked by Suddeutsche Zeitung about Bayern's interest in Sane, Hoeness replied: "We are considering him."

Hoeness' revelation comes just a day after star striker Robert Lewandowski claimed Sane could "immediately take us higher".

Bayern have also been linked with RB Leipzig star Timo Werner and Atletico Madrid midfielder Rodri.

Ralf Rangnick has doubts about whether Timo Werner will leave RB Leipzig for Bayern Munich in the close season.

Werner's contract at the Red Bull Arena is set to expire in June 2020 and the Bundesliga champions have been heavily linked with a swoop for the Germany international.

The 23-year-old striker has scored 50 goals in 93 league appearances for Leipzig, who secured a return to the Champions League by finishing third.

Rangnick, who will return to his position as sporting director with Julian Nagelsmann taking over as head coach from 2019-20, stated Leipzig have still not received an approach for Werner, despite him being available for the right price.

"I would not be so sure that [Werner] will actually go to Bayern," Rangnick told Sport Bild.

"If Bayern were absolutely sure about Timo, they would have already officially contacted us with a request. Anything else would be unusual for Bayern, especially since we have a good relationship with them.

"Our position has not changed: we do not want him to go into the last year of his contract without an extension.

"He can leave this summer when a club comes who is willing to pay a suitable transfer fee."

Leipzig have a chance to win the DFB-Pokal for the first time in their history when they face Bayern in the final in Berlin on Saturday.

Manuel Neuer and James Rodriguez have trained with Bayern Munich ahead of the DFB-Pokal final.

Niko Kovac's side face RB Leipzig in Berlin on Saturday as they seek to complete a domestic double, having held off the challenge of Borussia Dortmund to retain the Bundesliga title.

Captain Neuer has been out of action due to a calf injury since mid-April but could return to take the gloves against Leipzig after taking part in Tuesday's session.

James, who has not played this month as a result of his own calf issues, was also involved, with the Colombia international set for what could be a farewell appearance as his two-year loan from Real Madrid expires next month.

Leon Goretzka was absent from the session - the former Schalke midfielder training alone due to a knock sustained during Saturday's title-clinching defeat of Eintracht Frankfurt.

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