Caroline Wozniacki, a former world number one on the WTA Tour, has announced she will retire from professional tennis following next month's Australian Open.

In a lengthy Instagram post on Friday, the 29-year-old Dane, who claimed grand slam glory at Melbourne Park in 2018, said she had "accomplished everything I could ever dream of on the court".

Last year, Wozniacki revealed she had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, an auto-immune disease that causes swelling of the joints and fatigue.

However, she insisted her retirement was not due to health reasons, but rather her desire to focus on a series of matters away from tennis.

"I've played professionally since I was 15 years old," Wozniacki wrote. "In that time, I've experienced an amazing first chapter of my life. With 30 WTA singles titles, a world #1 ranking of 71 weeks, a WTA Finals victory, 3 Olympics [appearances], including carrying the flag for my native Denmark, and winning the 2018 Australian Open grand slam championship, I've accomplished everything I could ever dream of on the court.

"I've always told myself, when the time comes, that there are things away from tennis that I want to do more, then it's time to be done.

"In recent months, I've realised that there is a lot more in life that I'd like to accomplish off the court. Getting married to David [Lee, the former NBA star] was one of those goals and starting a family with him while continuing to travel the world and helping raise awareness about rheumatoid arthritis [project upcoming] are all passions of mine moving forward.

"So with that, today I am announcing that I will be retiring from professional tennis after the Australian Open in January. This has nothing to do with my health and this isn't a goodbye, I look forward to sharing my exciting journey ahead with all of you!"

"Finally, I want to thank with all my heart, the fans, my friends, my sponsors, my team, especially my father as my coach, my husband, and my family for decades of support! Without all of you I could have never have done this!"

A Melbourne swansong represents a fitting finale for Wozniacki, given the city played host to her greatest triumph.

Having twice suffered the pain of defeat in a grand slam final, at the 2009 and 2014 US Opens, Wozniacki ended her long wait with a gutsy three-set victory over Simona Halep that took close to three hours.

Her tally of 71 weeks as world number one is the ninth-highest total on the WTA Tour since the inception of computer rankings.

Wozniacki last topped the rankings following her 2018 Australian Open win, but she ended this year 38th on the list, her trademark court-covering ability seemingly compromised by her rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis.

Caroline Wozniacki, a former world number one on the WTA Tour, has announced she will retire from professional tennis following next month's Australian Open.

Carla Suarez Navarro has announced the 2020 WTA season will be the last of her career.

The former world number six is a seven-time grand slam quarter-finalist and has won two WTA singles titles in her career.

Suarez Navarro reached the final of the doubles at the WTA Finals in 2015 alongside Spanish compatriot Garbine Muguruza, suffering defeat to Martina Hingis and Sania Mirza.

The 31-year-old is ranked 55th in the world, having won 18 of her 36 matches in 2019, a year in which she reached the fourth round at Wimbledon before losing to Serena Williams in straight sets.

"The 2020 season will be my last year in the professional tennis circuit," said Suarez Navarro. "The sport has been a fundamental part of my life - it has given me immense joy and I cannot be more grateful for all the experiences that it has allowed me to live.

"At this time, I notice that the time has come to complete a beautiful chapter and begin to enjoy other areas of life. Tennis will always be in me.

"Tennis right now has a very high demand. To be high in the ranking you need absolute consistency, a world-class level of physical conditioning and a 24-hour daily psychological commitment.

"I have been in high competition for more than 15 years and have lived through these realities since the beginning of my adolescence. These are lessons that have formed me as a person and that will serve me for a lifetime.

"I want to enjoy one last season with the same professionalism as always. I am going to do a quality preparation, my whole team is going to travel with me from the month of January and I plan to compete until the end of the season. My desire is clear: to be proud of this last effort when I reach the end of the road."

Jamaica John Chin recently and Bermuda’s Trey Mallory teamed up to win the U18 title at the Antigua& Barbuda Cup held in St. John’s Antigua.

Andy Murray opted not to take any risks with a "bit of an issue" after only playing once for Great Britain in their run to the Davis Cup semi-finals.

The former world number one recorded a three-set singles victory against Tallon Griekspoor of the Netherlands but did not feature again during the new-look tournament in Spain.

Murray instead cheered on his team-mates as they reached the last four in Madrid, where they lost to eventual champions Spain.

The Scotsman – who lifted his first title following hip surgery at the European Open in October – revealed a "mild" groin issue kept him off the court, though only after consultation with both medical staff and team captain Leon Smith.

"I had a bit of an issue with my groin, pelvis. I wanted to play but I wasn't allowed to risk it," he said, according to quotes in the Mirror.

"I took the final decision but I'm obviously speaking to my physio, doctor, speaking to Leon.

"I don't know exactly when I did it because I had a scan straight after the match with Tallon Griekspoor because my groin area was sore during the match.

"I had noticed it a little bit a couple of days in the build-up so I didn't know because after Antwerp I took 12 days off or something and didn't hit any balls, and then I slowly built up till I got over to Madrid and then started practising hard and I noticed it was a bit sore.

"It was more like a bony bruise. It’s mild. But that was something which if I had played on it, it could have got worse. And that's why it was difficult for me."

Murray was speaking prior to the premier of his Amazon Prime Video documentary - Andy Murray: Resurfacing - that charts his comeback from a career-threatening hip issue.

World number two Karolina Pliskova has appointed Dani Vallverdu as her new coach for the 2020 season.

The Czech recently split with Conchita Martinez just six months after appointing the Spaniard on a full-time basis, having also worked with Rennae Stubbs.

Pliskova has now turned to Vallverdu, who has coached the likes of Andy Murray, Juan Martin del Potro and Stan Wawrinka, as she eyes an elusive first grand slam title.

The 27-year-old hopes the Venezuelan can take her game to another level next year in what will be his first experience of coaching on the WTA Tour.

"He was one of my priorities from the beginning. He's had great results with his players, he understands tennis like hardly anyone else and I'm convinced he has a lot to offer to me," she said of the Venezuelan.

"I'm already looking forward to the start of the preparation."

Former doubles player Olga Savchuk has also joined Pliskova's coaching staff.

 

Roger Federer joked he may never retire from tennis as he continues to focus on extending his career for as long as possible.

World number three Federer turned 38 in August and has just rounded off a hugely successful tour with Alexander Zverev.

The 20-time grand slam winner won four titles this season, while he missed out on glory at Wimbledon after losing in an epic final against Novak Djokovic.

Federer has recently invested in Swiss-based shoe company On Running, but he insists his business venture is not a sign he is set to stop playing the sport he loves. 

"I've been asked all week about how retirement is going to be and when it is going to come, I think they all needed to know," Federer said during his appearance on the Today Show.

"But no, this is not about retirement. On [the company] doesn't want me to retire, they want me to play as long as possible and that is my goal. I will never retire!"

Federer did acknowledge, however, that he is looking forward to the freedom his eventual retirement will bring, considering the impact tennis has on the rest of his life.

"I like my sweets, desserts, time off," he said. "I start my planning for the year around where I'm going to go on vacation with my family, and that's where I'll be in a couple of days, on the beach, so I can't wait.

"Actually, when I had my knee issues in 2016 and I was rehabbing for almost eight months, I felt like that could be my life after [retirement].

"Of course I was never as busy but it was just nice to be able to have schedules with friends – lunch on Wednesdays, dinners on Fridays, let's have a good time on the weekends together with another family. I’m really looking forward to that."

Federer's tour included matches against Zverev in Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Ecuador. The pair were due to play in Colombia too, but a curfew in Bogota meant the exhibition was called off.

"It was absolutely crazy," Federer said of the tour. "We played in four cities, almost in front of 100,000 people and Mexico City, had 42,000 people, double of Arthur Ashe Stadium here in New York.

"Breaking those records, doing it with Zverev, it's not something I ever thought I would do."

Rafael Nadal described Spain's Davis Cup success as "unforgettable" after beating Canada in the final in Madrid on Sunday.

Nadal overcame Denis Shapovalov 6-3 7-6 (9-7) after Roberto Bautista Agut had beaten Felix Auger-Aliassime to secure Spain's sixth Davis Cup title.

World number one Nadal was delighted with the success, saying it was a victory he would never forget.

"When you finally win the title after all the things that we went through this week, and playing at home, it is something difficult to describe," he said, via the Davis Cup website.

"It's an amazing feeling, and especially to share this great moment with all the people that supported us during the whole week is just unforgettable, for all the fans.

"And to share this victory too with the rest of the team, our six – and there is a much bigger team behind the scenes. We can't thank all of them enough.

"It's been an unforgettable week for all of us, without a doubt, so I'm super happy. And, honestly, it's one of these weeks that we'll never forget."

Bautista Agut made a gutsy return to the team just days after the death of his father.

The 31-year-old said he initially had no intention of playing as he hailed the efforts of his team-mates.

"It was very difficult. I was speaking with Sergi [Bruguera, captain] about the situation, and I took the decision to go home on Thursday morning, and I was back yesterday afternoon to support the team," Bautista Agut said.

"I drove here from Castellon and I didn't think about playing. I came to support the team with all my heart, but once we qualified for the final, I started to feel like playing.

"I had the opportunity to play because all the team and all the players and the rest of the team did an unbelievable effort since the first day. And, well, it was an amazing feeling on the court."

Rafael Nadal and Roberto Bautista Agut sealed Spain's sixth Davis Cup triumph at the expense of Canada's young guns on an emotional Sunday at a raucous La Caja Magica.

Bautista Agut shed tears on court after beating 19-year-old Felix Auger-Aliassime 7-6 (7-3) 6-3 in the first rubber just three days after the death of his father.

The 31-year-old showed incredible character to return for the final and rose to the occasion with the backing of a partisan crowd in Madrid.

Nadal then took centre stage on a highly charged evening, defeating battling 20-year-old Denis Shapovalov 6-3 7-6 (9-7) to secure a first Davis Cup triumph in eight years for the hosts as Canada failed to spoil the party in their first final.

Victory for Nadal in his homeland meant there was no need to battle it out in a deciding doubles rubber and put the icing on the cake at the end of another glorious season, which saw him win two grand slams to take his incredible tally to 19.

The world number one served superbly from the start but had to bide his time to force a break.

Shapovalov fended off break points in each of his first two service games before his fellow left-hander took a 4-2 lead with a rasping cross-court inside-out forehand winner.

A fired-up Nadal hopped beyond the baseline in delight after a return from Shapovalov sailed long to end a first set in which the home favourite lost just three points behind his sensational serve.

Shapovalov found another level in the second set, showing his quality with searing winners off both wings, but Nadal roared after saving the first break points he faced before levelling at 3-3.

Nadal saved a set point in a tie-break that always looked to be on the cards and dropped to the court in delight after Shapovalov drilled a forehand wide to spark jubilant scenes.

Auger-Aliassime earlier made a mammoth 45 unforced errors as Bautista Agut's experience shone through, the world number nine raising the roof when he took the opening-set tie-break after his teenage opponent overcooked a couple of wild groundstrokes.

Bautista Agut continued to glide around the court with fluency and opened up a 3-0 lead in the second set, then went 4-2 up courtesy of another errant Auger-Aliassime forehand after he had got back on serve. 

The composed Bautista Agut refused to allow Auger-Aliassime - who has been sidelined with an ankle injury - a way back and pointed to the sky after a hold to love made it 1-0 Spain.

Roger Federer and Alexander Zverev shattered the world record for attendance at a tennis match.

A crowd of 42,217 watched an exhibition match between Federer and Zverev at Plaza de Toros Mexico – the world's largest bullring – in Mexico City on Saturday.

Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters had previously set the record in their exhibition contest in 2010, which attracted 35,681 fans in Brussels.

But that figure was topped as 20-time grand slam champion Federer defeated Zverev 3-6 6-4 6-2 in the "The Greatest Match".

Afterwards, Federer tweeted: "I will never forget this magical evening in Mexico City with @AlexZverev 42,517 people came, We broke this record together! Viva Mexico."

Spain will face Canada in Sunday's Davis Cup final after Rafael Nadal and Feliciano Lopez edged the hosts past Great Britain.

A gripping semi-final saw the singles split and the tie came down to drama in the doubles on Saturday.

The Spanish duo, in front of a partisan crowd in Madrid, survived a major test as Nadal and Lopez needed two tie-breaks to fend off Jamie Murray and Neal Skupski.

With Andy Murray roaring on the British team from courtside, his older brother and Skupski pushed Nadal and Lopez through two intense sets before falling just short, losing 7-6 (7-3) 7-6 (10-8).

The British pair had set points to take it to a decider, but Spain, and Nadal in particular with one sublime overhead after a brilliant reach, produced their best when the pressure was at its greatest.

It was always likely Britain would need Kyle Edmund to win his singles rubber and he duly delivered with a 6-3 7-6 (7-3) win against Lopez – a late stand-in for the injured Pablo Carreno Busta.

But Nadal coasted to a 6-4 6-0 beating of Dan Evans, who tailed off after putting up a valiant effort in the first set against his more illustrious opponent.

And after the late-night doubles joy, with the contest finishing well after midnight, Nadal said: "I think we played a great match. 'Feli' served great the whole match and at important moments he did everything well.

"Thank you very much to Feli and the rest of the team."

Lopez said: "There was a lot of drama today on the court. We are very pleased we somehow managed to play those points in a very good way.

"It was a lot of drama but this is what you expect when you play this kind of match. I think we have a very good opportunity tomorrow to lift this cup."

Earlier, Canada reached the Davis Cup final for the first time in their history by winning a similarly thrilling tie against Russia.

Denis Shapovalov kept Canada in with a chance by beating Karen Khachanov 6-4 4-6 6-4 after Andrey Rublev overcame Vasek Pospisil 6-4 6-4.

And the Canadian duo defeated their Russian rivals 6-3 3-6 7-6 (7-5) in a thrilling deciding doubles rubber.

Coco Gauff will do battle against the likes of Serena Williams and Bianca Andreescu on the first week of the new WTA Tour season after signing up to play in the Auckland Open.

The 15-year-old sensation is limited in the number of tournaments she can play before turning 16 but has opted to play the WTA International event in New Zealand.

Gauff won her first senior title at the Linz Open last month and will use the Auckland tournament, which begins on January 6, as part of her preparation for the Australian Open.

US Open finalists Andreescu and Williams are also scheduled to be part of the field, meaning Gauff could meet either during the tournament, along with two-time defending champion Julia Goerges.

Gauff's success this year included a famous run to the fourth round of Wimbledon, where she became the youngest player in the Open era to come through the qualifying rounds to reach the main draw. Her exploits helped to secure a year-end ranking of 68.

She told the tournament website: "I can’t wait to start my season in Auckland. 2019 was such an incredible year and I achieved so many of the goals that I had set for myself. Wimbledon was obviously a highlight as was capturing my first WTA title.

"So many players talk about Auckland. I have not been before so this will be cool to experience."

Canada won a thrilling tie against Russia to seal a place in the Davis Cup final for the first time on Saturday.

Russia prevailed in a deciding doubles tie-break in an epic contest with Serbia a day earlier but were unable to repeat the trick as Denis Shapovalov and Vasek Pospisil made history for Canada.

The duo secured a 6-3 3-6 7-6 (7-5) triumph over Andrey Rublev and Karen Khachanov in Madrid, despite Pospisil having received treatment on a shoulder injury prior to the final set.

It marked the culmination of a memorable tussle, in which Russia struck first when Rublev earned a fourth singles victory of the week with a 6-4 6-4 win over Pospisil.

That meant Shapovalov had to defeat Khachanov to keep Canada's hopes alive and things were not looking good when the Russian raced into a 4-1 lead.

Shapovalov rallied brilliantly to take the opener, but succumbed when serving to stay in the second at 5-4 down.

A tense decider went the way of Shapovalov, who celebrated a 6-4 4-6 6-4 victory in a match featuring 73 unforced errors.

Spain or Great Britain, who contest the other last-four tie, await in the final.

Barcelona defender Gerard Pique denied his Davis Cup commitments are a distraction and has demanded respect from his critics.

The 32-year-old has spent a large part of the week travelling to Madrid due to the involvement of his company Kosmos in the revamped international tennis team event.

Head coach Ernesto Valverde gave Pique permission to make the trips to the Spanish capital, but he publicly warned the centre-back he would not play against Leganes on Saturday if his focus was not on Barcelona.

After playing a full part in Barca's 2-1 win at Estadio Municipal de Butarque, Pique explained his extra-curricular activities have had no impact on his performances on the field.

"I had friendly talks with [Valverde] this week," Pique told reporters. "He asked me what the plans for this week were and how we were going to do it.

"The relationship between me and him is good and we get along well. We talk every week and everything with him and the club is going well.

"It is more about the noise from the outside, which centres around whether I'm in Madrid, or if I have dinner here or there. It is all part of the circus and part of my job, but I try to do my best.

"In the end, they are 40-minute trips. I think we give a lot of attention to who I am and who I represent, but I try to make things as simple as possible. People can opine whatever they want, but respect me."

Pique, who planned to stay in Madrid to watch the semi-finals of the Davis Cup, talked up the importance of his side's comeback against Leganes.

Youssef En-Nesyri gave bottom side Leganes an early lead, but Luis Suarez and substitute Arturo Vidal hit back in the second half for Barcelona, who continue to jostle with Real Madrid for the LaLiga ascendancy.

"It was important for the team to continue winning in order to gain confidence," Pique said.

"If at the beginning of the season you told us we would be the leaders in LaLiga and our Champions League group, we would have taken it.

"In terms of the game, we know we can improve but the most important thing is to win games."

Two-time grand slam champion Garbine Muguruza has reunited with coach Conchita Martinez for the 2020 season.

Spaniard Muguruza was in the market for a new coach after splitting with Sam Sumyk in July.

The former world number one had Martinez in her corner when she won a second major title at Wimbledon in 2017, when Sumyk took time out for the birth of his daughter.

Martínez was available after she recently finished working with Karolina Pliskova and the 1994 Wimbledon champion has now been employed by her compatriot Muguruza.

"Garbine and I will work together in the 2020 season. With new challenges and enthusiasm." Martinez tweeted on Saturday.

Muguruza has dropped to 35th in the rankings after winning just one title in Monterrey last season.

 

Page 1 of 53
© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.