Webb Simpson fired another six-under 65 to lead the RBC Heritage, while Brooks Koepka continued his strong start on Friday.

Simpson, the 2013 runner-up at the PGA Tour event, managed nine birdies and three bogeys, shooting a second straight 65 to get to 12 under.

The American holds a one-stroke lead over Bryson DeChambeau (64) and Corey Conners (63) after the second round, which was suspended for two hours due to dangerous weather.

Conners' bogey-free 63 was the equal best second round, alongside Jhonattan Vegas and Tyler Duncan.

DeChambeau, meanwhile, produced a stunning finish to his round, making six birdies on his final nine holes.

Ryan Palmer (67) and Matt Fitzpatrick (66) are at 10 under, sharing fourth spot on the leaderboard.

Koepka followed up his opening-round 67 with a 66 to be at nine under and in a tie for sixth alongside Abraham Ancer (64), Vegas, Matthew NeSmith (67) and Ian Poulter (69).

Dustin Johnson managed a five-under 66 to be at eight under, two shots better off than Jordan Spieth (70).

World number one Rory McIlroy got going with a six-under 65 that saw the Northern Irishman climb into a tie for 45th at five under.

Rickie Fowler and Jason Day were among the players to miss the cut on a day which saw Nick Watney withdraw after testing positive for coronavirus.

Rory McIlroy and LeBron James produced memorable moments on June 19, a date that means much to England cricket fans but one their Australian counterparts will always want to forget.

McIlroy was magnificent as he won the 2011 U.S. Open, five years before James and the Cleveland Cavaliers completed a memorable triumph over the Golden State Warriors.

As for the Ashes rivals, England's batsmen were undoubtedly on top in 2018 as they put Australia's poor bowlers to the sword in Nottingham.

Take a look back at some of the memorable moments that have happened on this day through the years.

 

2011: Major breakthrough for McIlroy

Just over two months after enduring a last-round meltdown that ended his hopes of Masters glory at Augusta, McIlroy secured his first major - and in some style, too.

The Congressional course was no match for the Northern Irishman, who left the field fighting it out for second place - Jason Day would eventually finish a distant runner-up - and had the statisticians trawling through the records.

McIlroy's eight-shot triumph was the biggest margin of victory in the tournament's history, while his final score of 16 under was a record for strokes under par (a feat matched by Brooks Koepka in 2017). 

2016: Cavs stun Warriors to reign at last

Having returned for a second spell with Cleveland, the team that drafted him back in 2003, James finally steered the Cavs to glory in the NBA Finals.

The Golden State Warriors appeared on course to retain their title when they led the best-of-seven series 3-1. LeBron, however, had other ideas, inspiring his team to rally from the brink of defeat to claim the city's first professional sports title in 52 years.

His triple-double was influential in deciding the outcome of Game 7, though his most notable play was 'The Block' on Andre Iguodala late in proceedings. Yet it was Kyrie Irving who made the key shot with just under a minute remaining, sinking a three-pointer that helped clinch a 93-89 triumph.

2018: Australia suffer as England run up the score

Going, going gone. England's one-day team made history in the third match of the series against Australia, smashing their way to a world record total in the 50-over format.

Jonny Bairstow and Alex Hales both made centuries as the hosts amassed 481-6 at Trent Bridge. Captain Eoin Morgan weighed in with a rapid 67, helping England ease past their previous highest score of 444-3, made against Pakistan just under two years earlier at the same venue.

Australia could only muster 237 all out in reply to suffer their heaviest ever loss in ODI cricket in terms of runs (242 runs, to be precise). They would end up being swept in the series too, going down 5-0.

Rory McIlroy admitted he was uncomfortable as the world number one struggled during the RBC Heritage first round on Thursday.

McIlroy battled to a one-over 72 at Harbour Town Golf Links in South Carolina to be well off the pace at the PGA Tour event.

The four-time major champion, playing the tournament for the first time since 2009, said it was hard to get comfortable during the opening round.

"I think just my overall comfort level. I wasn't particularly comfortable out there," the Northern Irishman told a news conference.

"I played here once before in '09, and I just can remember not being that comfortable around here then, and it's still sort of the same.

"I'm just not comfortable and sort of trying to pick lines and really commit to shots. I just wasn't as committed as I need to be around here."

McIlroy mixed three bogeys with two birdies to be left back in a tie for 101st after the first round.

Brooks Koepka believes commentators should "just shut up and listen" instead of asking players to wear microphones.

The PGA Tour has returned without fans in attendance amid the coronavirus pandemic, and players have been invited to wear microphones to give viewers greater insight.

However, most have reportedly opted not to do so, and four-time major champion Koepka said there was a simple solution if broadcasters wanted to have players heard.

"I don't understand why they want us to wear a mic when there is a boom mic 10 feet away from every shot that I hit," the American said after the RBC Heritage first round.

"If the announcers just shut up and listen you could hear every word that we're talking about. I don't understand what the thing is.

"Half the time the lady is holding a boom mic and she's listening to everything that we're saying all the way down.

"If they would just shut up they could hear everything."

Koepka opened the RBC Heritage with a four-under 67 to be three shots adrift of leaders Ian Poulter and Mark Hubbard.

Ian Poulter grabbed a share of the lead at the RBC Heritage as Jordan Spieth and Brooks Koepka made solid starts on Thursday.

Poulter and American Mark Hubbard carded seven-under 64s in the first round at Harbour Town Golf Links in South Carolina to be tied atop the leaderboard.

Englishman Poulter has finished no lower than tied for 32nd in his past five events and the 44-year-old made seven birdies to begin the PGA Tour tournament.

Poulter and Hubbard share a one-stroke lead ahead of a group of seven players.

Sebastian Munoz, Viktor Hovland, Michael Thompson, Webb Simpson, Dylan Frittelli, Brice Garnett and Ryan Palmer opened with six-under 65s.

Coming off a top-10 finish at the Charles Schwab Challenge, former world number one Spieth made a fine start with a five-under 66.

The American recovered from a triple bogey at the par-four 12th hole – his third of the day – and was two over through his first 10 holes.

However, Spieth reeled off seven birdies from the second hole through the ninth, including six straight, to be tied for 10th.

Matthew NeSmith, Tony Finau, Matt Fitzpatrick, Erik van Rooyen and Mackenzie Hughes are alongside Spieth at five under.

Four-time major champion Koepka opened with a 67 to be tied for 16th alongside Rickie Fowler and Ernie Els, among others.

World number one Rory McIlroy, playing the tournament for the first time since 2009, battled to a one-over 72 to be well back.

Rory McIlroy has questioned whether the European golfers who decided against travelling to the United States for the resumption of the PGA Tour "really care" about their careers.

The Northern Irishman is known for his outspoken comments and his latest verbal volley is likely to provoke a strong reaction, especially as it applies to several of his Ryder Cup team-mates.

McIlroy finished in a tie for 32nd at the Charles Schwab Challenge as professional golf returned from its coronavirus-enforced shutdown last week, but the likes of Tommy Fleetwood and Francesco Molinari were absent.

With ranking points on the line once again, those who choose to sit out events will suffer, but McIlroy has little sympathy for them.

"Personally, if I were in their shoes and I was asked to come over to the States and shelter in place or quarantine for two weeks before these tournaments, I would have done that," said the four-time major winner, who is preparing for the RBC Heritage in South Carolina.

"I mean, if you really care about your career and care about moving forward, you should be here, I think. Last week was 70 world ranking points for the winner, this week it's 74.

"And I get that there are different variables and families and stuff involved, but we all have the means to rent a very nice house in a gated community in Florida, and it's not a hardship for two weeks to come over and quarantine.

"I mean, it's fine. My caddie Harry came over and did it. He stayed in our guest house. The two weeks flew by.

"I honestly don't understand the guys complaining because there is a solution to it. You can come over here and do what needs to be done.

"It might seem a little harsh, but I don't get that mindset, especially if you care about your career and you want to advance."

Tiger Woods did not only win the 2000 U.S. Open on June 18, he did so having obliterated the rest of the field.

Two decades ago, no one could get near to Woods and his record-breaking performance at Pebble Beach.

Mike Catt got much closer to Jonah Lomu five years earlier, not that he was able to stop him, while Eoin Morgan was delivering his own dominant performance on June 18, 2019.

Here we take a look at three major sporting events to have occurred on June 18 in previous years.

 

1995 - Lomu steamrollers England

Lomu delivered perhaps the finest individual performance at a Rugby World Cup match when starring for New Zealand against England in the 1995 semi-final.

The wing scored four tries as the All Blacks won 45-29 against an England side that simply could not contain the All Blacks' number 11.

His first score was the best, as Lomu collected a ball that bounced behind him, held off two England players and then dismissively ploughed over Catt when off-balance before dotting down.

In another incredible demonstration of speed, Lomu crossed for the fourth time when side-stepping Catt to leave the England back grasping at air.

 

2000 - Woods goes wire-to-wire at Pebble Beach

Stating Woods was the wire-to-wire winner at the 2000 U.S. Open only begins to explain his dominance given his eventual major record 15-stroke advantage.

Woods arrived at the 100th U.S. Open as a two-time major champion and a third looked assured even before the weekend as he had a six-shot lead after 36 holes.

Only playing against himself by the Sunday, Woods parred the opening nine holes before reeling off four birdies in five holes en route to a final-round 67. It was the first of four majors in a row that Woods would win - which became known as the 'Tiger Slam'.

 

2019 - Aerial Eoin dismantles Afghanistan attack

Prior to hosting the World Cup on home soil in 2019, England players had mused on the possibility of becoming the first team in ODI history to score 500 runs.

It did not quite happen, but the reason for such optimism was evident when they took Afghanistan's attack apart in making 397-6 in a group-stage game at Old Trafford.

Several records did fall as captain Morgan made the most sixes in an ODI (17), England accrued the most maximums in an ODI (25) while poor Rashid Khan went for 0-110 off his nine overs.

Morgan, who would end up lifting the trophy later that tournament, finished with a frankly ridiculous 148 from 71 balls before England claimed a 150-run success.

Tiger Woods sealed a historic triumph at the U.S. Open on this day in 2000.

The American won by 15 strokes, which still stands as a record margin of victory at a major.

Woods' display at Pebble Beach is widely regarded as the greatest performance in golf history.

Here is a look at how Woods, then aged 24, secured his most dominant victory.

Round 1: 65 (leads by 1)

Woods issued an early statement of intent with a blemish-free opening round. He made the turn in 33 and proved relentless on the back nine, making a further four gains to move to six under par. Miguel Angel Jimenez was just one shot back.

Round 2: 69 (leads by 6)

The chasing pack, Jimenez included, could not keep pace amid worsening conditions on the Friday. Woods' round was halted by darkness and he returned the next day to finish up and sign for a 69, while Jimenez could only manage a 74 to sit level on two under with Thomas Bjorn, some six shots back from the imperious Woods.

Round 3: 71 (leads by 10)

By the close of the third round, that lead was an unassailable 10 strokes over Ernie Els. Despite having to play 24 holes on the Saturday and making a triple bogey on the third hole of his third round, Woods still left the rest of the field for dead. He finished the day as the only player under par and left the trophy engraver in little doubt as to what he would be carving into the silverware the next day.

Round 4: 67 (leads by 15)

Barring a meltdown of unfathomable proportions, Woods had the title in the bag. Yet he still wanted to finish in style, setting his sights on a bogey-free closing round. That was at risk when he stood over a 15-foot putt to save par at the 16th, but Woods sunk it and celebrated with vigour. It helped him to a final-round 67 and an overall score of 12 under, making it the first double-digit below-par score in tournament history. Jimenez and Els were his closest rivals on three over. The most resounding victory in major golf history was complete.

What they said:

"The only thing I know is I got the trophy sitting right next to me. To perform the way I did, and on one of the greatest venues in golf, it doesn't get much better than that." – Tiger Woods

"We've been talking about him for two years. I guess we'll be talking about him for the next 20. When he's on, we don't have much of a chance." – Ernie Els

"If you were building the complete golfer, you'd build Tiger Woods." – Mark O'Meara

Rory McIlroy dismissed suggestions his final rounds were an issue as he prepares for the RBC Heritage.

In the first tournament back after the coronavirus-enforced break, world number one McIlroy was in contention at the Charles Schwab Challenge before finishing in a tie for 32nd following a final-round 74.

The Northern Irishman is without a win in five starts this year, but McIlroy said Sundays were no issue.

"I wouldn't say that Sundays this year have been disappointing," he told a news conference on Wednesday.

"Maybe Bay Hill [at the Arnold Palmer Invitational], I would say was disappointing, and obviously last week, but that was just more annoying, like I played crap. That was really it.

"Like it wasn't as if it was anything to do with the position I was in or I got off to a really bad start and got into the rough on the front nine and hit decent shots that ended up in a bunker or a bad lie or whatever and just ... it's one of those things where the momentum just started going the other way.

"It's fine. I played okay last week. It was a good gauge to see where I was at and what I needed to practice and what I needed to do going into the next few weeks.

"Obviously disappointing not to shoot a good one on Sunday, but it was fine. I learnt quite a bit from it, and hopefully those lessons I can put into practice this week."

The LPGA Tour is to return on July 31, more than five months after the season was halted due to the coronavirus crisis.

Since Inbee Park won the Australian Open in February, the Tour has been suspended amid the proliferation of COVID-19.

After a long wait, a new three-day event called the Drive On Championship at Inverness Club in Toledo will herald the return of competitive women's golf.

Another tournament will be held in Ohio the following week as the rescheduled Marathon LPGA Classic takes place at Highland Meadows Golf Club in Sylvania from August 6.

"Thanks in part to the generosity of our partners who could not reschedule their events in 2020, we are adding a valuable additional playing opportunity for our LPGA Tour members," said LPGA commissioner Mike Whan.

Earlier this month, the Tour announced that the Evian Championship, one of its five majors, will not take place in 2020.

Restrictions on travel and government quarantine protocols meant the event, which was scheduled to take place in Evian-les-Bains from August 6-9 after being pushed back from July, was cancelled.

The British Open is scheduled to be the first major of the season in August, with the ANA Inspiration having previously been moved from April to September.

The PGA Championship was switched to October from a date in June, while the U.S. Open was delayed until December.

June 17, 2010 was the date Kobe Bryant got his fifth and final NBA ring.

The Los Angeles Lakers icon, who died in a helicopter crash earlier this year, helped his franchise beat the Boston Celtics in Game 7 of the 2010 NBA Finals.

Two years ago Brooks Koepka became a back-to-back champion at the U.S. Open while in 1999 Australia and South Africa played one of the most thrilling Cricket World Cup contests ever.

We take a look at major sporting events that have happened on June 17 in previous years.

 

1999 - Australia edge past Proteas in dramatic semi

Until England's incredible Super Over win over New Zealand in last year's World Cup final, the 1999 semi-final between Australia and South Africa was perhaps the greatest ODI ever.

Shaun Pollock and Allan Donald managed to restrict Australia to 213 and though Shane Warne (4-29) kept his team in the match, South Africa entered the final over nine down but needing nine more to reach the final.

Successive fours from Lance Klusener (31 not out) tied the scores but, with the Proteas needing only one run from their final four deliveries, a mix-up between Klusener and Donald resulted in the latter being run out.

The game finished as a tie but Australia went through to the final because they had a superior run rate in the Super Six stage, with South Africa left to reflect on some all-too-familiar World Cup heartache.

 

2010 - Kobe leads Lakers past Celtics

Boston, who had beaten Los Angeles in the 2008 Finals, were 3-2 up after Game 5 but knew the series would be closed out in the City of Angels.

The Lakers, who were the defending champions, forced a Game 7 and came out on top 83-79 to clinch the franchise's 16th - and to date most recent - championship.

Bryant was voted Finals MVP for the second time in his career and scored a game-high 23 points in the decider.

 

2018 - Koepka wins U.S. Open again

Twelve months after he won by four strokes to claim his first major, Koepka proved to be unstoppable once more at the U.S. Open.

The American began the day in a four-way tie for the lead and his two-under-par 68 on Sunday was enough to earn him a one-stroke success over Tommy Fleetwood at Shinnecock Hills.

Koepka became just the third man since World War II - after Ben Hogan and Curtis Strange - to successfully defend the U.S. Open title.

June 15 is a momentous sporting date that the Detroit Pistons and their fans will not forget in a hurry.

Sixteen years ago on this day, the team earned an emphatic 4-1 win over favourites the Los Angeles Lakers to seal glory in the NBA Finals.

This date also represents the 40-year anniversary of a famous day in golfing history, when Jack Nicklaus broke a record at the U.S. Open.

We look back at some of the top moments to occur on June 15 in the world of sport.


2004 - Pistons top Lakers 4-1 in NBA Finals

The Pistons sealed a stunning 4-1 series win over the Lakers on this day in 2004, with a 100-87 win in Game 5 ensuring they secured glory in Michigan.

Richard Hamilton top-scored with 21 points, Ben Wallace starred with 22 rebounds and Chauncey Billups had a game-high six assists.

Billups was named Finals MVP as coach Larry Brown savoured his first championship, his underdog team having won three straight after going down to an overtime loss in Game 2.

Game 5 was notable as the last game for Shaquille O'Neal, Karl Malone and Gary Payton for the Lakers, who had won previously three straight titles between 2000 and 2002.

This remains the Pistons' most recent NBA title, as they lost a thrilling Finals series 4-3 to the San Antonio Spurs the following year and have not returned since.

The Lakers, meanwhile, reached three straight Finals when coach Phil Jackson returned to the team later in the decade, winning two, including their last triumph in 2010.

Kobe Bryant top-scored with 24 points in a losing effort against the Pistons in Game 5.

He would go on to be named NBA Finals MVP in each of their 2009 and 2010 successes, moving on to five rings in the process.


1980 – Nicklaus sets record in U.S. Open triumph

Jack Nicklaus' fourth and final U.S. Open victory was a special one in 1980.

The American set a new tournament scoring record with an eight-under par score of 272 to win his fourth title at the event, finishing two shots clear of Japanese challenger Isao Aoki.

Nicklaus had started the week with a magnificent 63 to take a share of the first-round lead, and led by two after a more steady effort of 71 on day two.

After moving day, he was in a share of the lead with Aoki while four other players, including Tom Watson, were within two shots.

A thrilling finale was in store for June 15 and Nicklaus delivered with a 68 to claim his 16th major, 18 years after winning his first U.S. Open.

He romped to US PGA glory later that year, before his 18th and final major arrived six years later at the 1986 Masters.
 

1974 - Evert wins first of seven French Opens

American Chris Evert holds the women's singles record with an astonishing seven French Open titles.

She won the first of her Paris crowns on this day in 1974, emphatically defeating the third seed, Russian Olga Morozova, 6-1 6-2.

In the absence of Margaret Court, who had beaten her in a three-set thriller in the previous year's final, top seed Evert thrived.

She went through the whole tournament without losing a set, with German Helga Masthoff, the fourth seed, seen off in the semi-finals in a tougher test than she ended up having in the showpiece.

Evert also won Wimbledon that year as part of a sensational 55-match winning streak.

She successfully defended her French Open title the following year, and her third success in 1979 started a streak of five wins in the space of five years.

Rory McIlroy lamented his "bad start" after the world number one finished nine strokes behind Charles Schwab Challenge champion Daniel Berger.

McIlroy carded a final-round 74 to end the PGA Tour's comeback tournament tied for 32nd at six under, well adrift of Berger – who prevailed in a play-off against Collin Morikawa on Sunday.

Playing without fans at Colonial Country Club in the Tour's first event since the coronavirus pandemic suspended the season in March, McIlroy had a double bogey and four bogeys from his opening nine holes of the day.

The four-time major champion managed to collect three birdies following the turn, outweighing a bogey at the 15th hole in Texas, but it was too late.

"I got off to a really bad start," McIlroy said. "Hit a loose second shot on the first hole up to the right and then sort of messed around and took bogey there, so not the ideal start.

"The wind was up today. You didn't have to be that much off for it to sort of show and I missed a couple of greens in the wrong spots and made bogeys.

"But you know, played all the way to the end, shot a decent back nine. I was a couple under on the back, but front nine I just got into a rut and played a bad run of holes and obviously that put me out of the tournament."

McIlroy will now turn his attention to the RBC Heritage in South Carolina, where the Northern Irishman will play for the first time since 2009, when he was 19 years old.

Jordan Spieth insisted he had "gained a lot of confidence" from his performance at the Charles Schwab Challenge.

In contention at the Colonial Country Club, Spieth carded a one-over 71 in the final round to finish four shots from being in a play-off, which Daniel Berger won.

Spieth is winless since 2017, but the American now has two top-10 finishes in six events this year, as the PGA Tour returned amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The three-time major winner got plenty out of his performance in Fort Worth, Texas.

"I knew coming in I didn't have all the tools, didn't have all my weapons yet. But I certainly gained more this week, gained a lot of confidence," Spieth said.

"I'm making those putts from mid-to-long range and I'm driving the ball in good position.

"It's really just cleaning up the wedges and stuff that I'm normally really sharp with that certainly had a bit of rust on it. I feel really good going into the next couple of weeks for sure."

Spieth, who is set to play at the RBC Heritage starting on Thursday, said there were still elements of his game that needed work.

"Very pleased with my driving. I felt like I hit my driver really well," he said.

"I had one today where I just necked it and the wind picked up, and it took a big bounce and went out of bounds. It wasn't really that bad of a shot.

"But for the entire week I drove the ball, I felt, really well, put myself in position to make a lot of birdies and made a lot of birdies.

"I've just got to get sharper with kind of my in-between numbers, the stuff that when you're used to just kind of hitting balls on the range and not playing tournament golf and you're not really practising them as much, so that will be what I work on this next week."

Daniel Berger ended a three-year wait for another PGA Tour title, winning the Charles Schwab Challenge in a play-off on Sunday.

The American beat Collin Morikawa on the first play-off hole at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas in the first tournament back after the coronavirus-enforced break.

Berger carded a four-under 66 in the final round and Morikawa shot a 67 to finish at 15 under.

But as Berger made par at the first play-off hole – the 17th – Morikawa missed a short putt to stretch the tournament a little longer.

For Berger, it was his third PGA Tour victory and first since 2017, when he defended his St Jude Classic crown.

"It's just a range of emotions," the 27-year-old told CBS.

"I've grinded so hard the last two months to be in this position and I'm just so thankful that all the hard work paid off."

Overnight leader Xander Schauffele carded a one-under 69 to finish tied for third alongside Jason Kokrak (64), Bryson DeChambeau (66) and Justin Rose (66), a shot behind Berger and Morikawa.

Bubba Watson (65) and Patrick Reed (67) were a shot further back, while Gary Woodland (70) finished outright ninth at 12 under.

There was a star-studded chasing pack overnight and Jordan Spieth and Justin Thomas were among them, but the American pair fired one-over 71s in the final round.

Spieth and Thomas finished tied for 10th alongside Im Sung-jae (67) and J.T. Poston (68).

World number one Rory McIlroy also struggled in the final round, battling to a four-over 74 to finish tied for 32nd.

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