Brooklyn Nets point guard Spencer Dinwiddie announced on Monday he has tested positive for coronavirus and is uncertain to join the team in Orlando for next month's restart of the NBA season.

Dinwiddie confirmed his diagnosis in an interview with The Athletic and added that he has experienced symptoms related to COVID-19.

Per NBA medical protocols that have been established during the restart plan, he will be put into quarantine for at least 10 days and must pass at least two retests before being permitted to rejoin the Nets.

"Originally, we were supposed to be one of the teams to enter the Orlando bubble early, but training camp got switched back to New York and unfortunately I am now positive," he said. "Given that I have experienced symptoms, including fever and chest tightness, it is unclear on whether or not I'll be able to participate in Orlando."

Dinwiddie had planned on playing when the Nets resume their season July 31 at the Walt Disney World Complex and said he initially tested negative for the virus after returning to New York to take part in workouts.

"I was ready and prepared to rejoin my team-mates as we were to be an early entry team in the resumed season," Dinwiddie said. "I flew private to return to New York, passed multiple COVID-19 tests over my first several days in New York and was able to participate in a couple of practices within the first week."

Prior to the season's stoppage on March 11, Dinwiddie was averaging career highs of 20.6 points and 6.8 assists per game to help the Nets maintain a playoff spot in the Eastern Conference despite injuries to stars Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant. Brooklyn enter the restart seventh in the East and six games ahead of the ninth-placed Washington Wizards.

Neither Durant nor Irving are expected to return this season, and ESPN reported on Sunday that veteran forward Wilson Chandler informed the Nets he will not take part in the restart due to health and family reasons.

It is unclear if Dinwiddie is one of the 16 unidentified players the NBA announced last week were positive for COVID-19 during preliminary testing for the season's resumption. Other players who have either revealed they tested positive or reportedly done so include Denver Nuggets All-Star Nikola Jokic, Indiana Pacers guard Malcolm Brogdon, Miami Heat forward Derrick Jones Jr. and three Sacramento Kings – Buddy Hield, Jabari Parker and Alex Len.

Brooklyn Nets veteran Wilson Chandler has opted to sit out the NBA's season restart, prioritising the health of his family amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The NBA has been suspended since March, but the 2019-20 campaign is scheduled to resume at the Disney World complex in Orlando, Florida next month.

Brooklyn are set to return to action against the Orlando Magic on July 31, however, Nets forward Chandler will not be involved.

"As difficult as it will be to not be with my team-mates, the health and wellbeing of my family has to come first," Chandler told ESPN on Sunday.

"Thank you to the Nets organisation for understanding and supporting me in this decision, and I will be watching and rooting for our team in Orlando."

The Nets were seventh in the Eastern Conference with a 30-34 record prior to the COVID-19 crisis.

Chandler, who joined the Nets at the start of the season, had been averaging 5.9 points and 4.1 rebounds per game for Brooklyn in 2019-20.

The season will officially resume on July 30, with the New Orleans Pelicans playing the Utah Jazz and LeBron James' Los Angeles Lakers taking on Kawhi Leonard's Los Angeles Clippers.

The NBA officially revealed its schedule for the resumption of the 2019-20 season following the coronavirus-enforced break and opening night features a star rookie and a marquee matchup. 

Zion Williamson and the New Orleans Pelicans will face the Utah Jazz at the Disney World complex near Orlando, Florida on July 30 in the first game of the resumed season, which will consist of a 22-team format.

The second game of the nationally televised doubleheader has LeBron James' Los Angeles Lakers facing Kawhi Leonard and the Los Angeles Clippers.  

The opening game will come more than four months after the season was paused on March 11 after Utah's Rudy Gobert became the first player in the league to test positive for COVID-19.

On Friday, the league officially completed talks with the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) on the terms for restarting the season, paving the way for the 88-game schedule of what are being called seeding games between 22 teams to be released. 

"We're coming back because sports matter in our society," NBA commissioner Adam Silver said. "They bring people together when they need it most."

Each team will play eight "seeding" games that will take place in a 16-day span before ending on August 14.

The league will then begin a typical playoff format with the NBA Finals set to begin September 30 and ending no later than October 13. 

Excluding the opening night of the restart, there will be between four to seven games each day spread across three different courts. 

Games will start as early as 13:00 (local time) on weekdays, 12:30 on weekends and ending with 21:00 starts.  

Several players have opted out of the restart plan with reasons related to the coronavirus, while others – including the Denver Nuggets' Nikola Jokic, Sacramento Kings team-mates Jabari Parker and Alex Len and the Indiana Pacers' Malcolm Brogdon have tested positive.  

The NBA's suspended 2019-20 season is set to resume in Florida after the league and its Players Association formally agreed on a comprehensive plan to restart last month. 

The agreement clears the way for the NBA to play games solely at the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida beginning July 30, with 22 of the league's 30 teams taking part in the resumption. Each team will play eight games to determine seeding for a 16-team playoff tournament, with the NBA to release a full schedule as well as national television broadcasts later on Friday. 

As expected, all games at the Disney complex will be played spectator-free and will be held under strict health and safety protocols designed to minimise risks related to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The NBA had already begun the process of testing players eligible to take part in the restart for COVID-19, with the league and the union announcing on Friday that 16 of 302 players examined tested positive. Per those protocols, any player with a positive test will be required to self-isolate until being cleared by a physician to return to his team.  

That policy figures to be tested even with the league's attempts to contain players in a bubble environment. Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Florida have risen at a rapid rate of late, and have reportedly doubled within the Orlando era housing the Disney complex over the past few weeks.  

The plan also contains an initiative to further address the issues of racial inequality and systemic racism, topics that have been at the forefront of the minds of NBA players following last month's death of African-American George Floyd while in the custody of a white police officer in Minneapolis.  

"We have worked together with the Players Association to establish a restart that prioritises health and safety, preserves competitive fairness and provides a platform to address social justice issues," said Commissioner Adam Silver. "We are grateful to our long-time collaborator Disney for its role in playing host and making this return to play possible, and we also thank the public health officials and infectious disease specialists who helped guide the creation of comprehensive medical protocols and protections." 

Players are scheduled to report to Orlando in early July with training camps slated to begin July 9. The first round of the playoffs is scheduled to start on August 17 with September 30 the target date for Game 1 of the NBA Finals.  

"It is very exciting to officially announce the restart of the 2019-20 season," said NBPA executive director Michele Roberts. "It has taken true collaboration between the league and the union - special kudos to our executive committee and several other team reps - along with the continued support and assistance from medical experts, public health officials and many others." 

Sixteen NBA players have tested positive for coronavirus from the latest round of tests, the league has announced.

The results of Tuesday's COVID-19 tests on 302 players were released on Friday in a joint statement from the league and the National Basketball Players Association.

The statement said: "Any player who has tested positive will remain in self-isolation until he satisfies public health protocols for discontinuing isolation and has been cleared by a physician."

The news comes just over a month before the NBA plans to conclude the 2019-20 regular season and playoffs with a 22-team tournament in Orlando, Florida.

With numbers of new COVID-19 cases rising in the USA, including in the home states of franchises included in the 22-team format, some concern has arisen about the NBA's plan.

Arizona, Texas and Florida have been hit particularly hard in recent weeks.

The league is currently in a testing and transaction window, which allows teams to add free agents before rosters are set on July 1.

Training camps are scheduled to begin on July 9, and the NBA plans on resuming the regular season on July 30.

The NBA may be coming back next month, but Vince Carter will not be returning to the court again having confirmed his retirement.

Only the 22 teams with the best records will recommence the 2019-20 season in Florida, with the campaign already over for eight clubs, including Carter's Atlanta Hawks.

The 43-year-old became the first man to play an NBA game in four different decades this year, but he told the Ringer's 'Winging It With Vince Carter' podcast that he was "officially done playing basketball professionally".

Though 'Vinsanity' will not be afforded the farewell many of his peers received, we take a look at the eight-time All-Star's brilliant career using Stats Perform News numbers.

 

LONGEVITY

Carter entered the league in 1998 having been drafted fifth overall and he played in 50 games for the Toronto Raptors during a lockout-shortened campaign, during which he won Rookie of the Year.

Incredibly, the guard has barely missed any significant time over the past 22 years - only sitting out the final 22 games of the 2001-02 season and the start of the following term due to injury - and he started all 82 games for the New Jersey Nets in 2006-07.

In all, Carter has played 1,541 games, the third-most of all time and a total only Robert Parish and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar can better, and he was only 20 appearances away from moving up to second on the list.

The honour of playing in the most NBA seasons does belong to Carter, though, as this campaign was his 22nd, one more than Parish, Kevin Garnett, Dirk Nowitzki and Kevin Willis.

 

JOURNEYMAN

Unlike Dallas Mavericks icon Nowitzki - the NBA's ultimate one-team man - and Garnett, who represented only three clubs, Carter has called almost a third of the NBA home at one point or another.

After lengthy spells with the Raptors and Nets, Carter played for the Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, Mavericks, Memphis Grizzlies and Sacramento Kings before arriving in Atlanta in 2018.

Of those to have played for eight NBA teams, Carter's 25,728 points are 6,314 more than anyone else, with Jamal Crawford next on that list ahead of Otis Thorpe and Willis.

Carter has played at least 50 games per season at each of those eight stops, another record he holds along with others such as Crawford and Matt Barnes.

 

POINTS

Naturally given such longevity, it is no surprise to see Carter flying high on all-time points lists too.

His 25,728 points are the 19th-most of all time, more than notable names such as Reggie Miller, Patrick Ewing and Charles Barkley.

Moreover, Carter is a top-five scorer for two different franchises: the Nets (where he has the third-most points ever) and the Raptors (where he has the fourth-most). Others to own that distinction include Chris Bosh (the Raptors and Miami Heat) and LeBron James (Cleveland Cavaliers and Heat).

Carter's accuracy from beyond the arc certainly helped his numbers, as he drained 2,290 three-pointers - sixth-most of all time - from 6,168 attempts, the fifth-most of all time.

He may not get the rapturous send-off his career deserves, but Carter's impact on the NBA over the past two-and-a-bit decades has certainly been felt.

Vince Carter has officially announced his retirement after a 22-year NBA career, a decision that was expected once the Atlanta Hawks were not part of the 22 teams that will resume play next month in Florida.

The 43-year-old made the announcement on Thursday during the Ringer's 'Winging It With Vince Carter' podcast.

"I'm officially done playing basketball professionally," Carter told co-host Annie Finberg.

Carter's last appearance came against the New York Knicks on March 11, the same night the NBA suspended play due to the coronavirus pandemic.

"Since the end of March, I pretty much felt that it was over and that's kind of how I've handled it," Carter said. "It's unfortunate, but with the coronavirus, it was taking people's lives rapidly.

"That's the big picture in my mind so I was able to put the weird ending, the abrupt stoppage of play to an ending aside for the bigger picture."

Carter was selected by the Golden State Warriors with the fifth overall pick in 1998 before being sent to the Toronto Raptors in a draft-night deal. He was named the NBA Rookie of the Year during the lockout-shortened 1998-99 season.

That was just the beginning for Carter in an incredible career filled with accomplishments in which he also played for the New Jersey Nets, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, Dallas Mavericks, Memphis Grizzlies and Sacramento Kings.

Carter became the only NBA player to play 22 seasons and the first to appear in a game in four different decades.

His 1,541 games are the third-most of all time, and he ranks 19th in league history with 25,728 points and sixth with 2,290 three-pointers.

Carter was an eight-time All-Star, won the Slam Dunk Contest in 2000 and helped the United States win the gold medal at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney.

"When I played the game, I played to win," Carter said. "I had a smile on my face because I was thankful every day that I'm getting the opportunity to play in the NBA.

"I have never taken it for granted and I never will. Honestly, when you're walking away from it you appreciate the years you played even more."

Sacramento Kings forward Jabari Parker announced on Wednesday that he tested positive for COVID-19.

Parker has appeared in only one game for the Kings due to a right shoulder injury and an illness after he was traded to Sacramento by Atlanta in February.

He is averaging 14.7 points and 5.9 rebounds in 33 games this season.

"Several days ago I tested positive for COVID-19 and I immediately self-isolated in Chicago which is where I remain," Parker said in a statement.

"I am progressing in my recovery and feeling well. I look forward to joining my team-mates in Orlando as we return to the court for the resumption of the NBA season."

The Kings are among the 22 teams to resume play beginning on July 30 at the Disney complex in Orlando, Florida.

Indiana Pacers guard Malcolm Brogdon said he tested positive for coronavirus in a statement released on Wednesday. 

In his first season with the Pacers after arriving from the Milwaukee Bucks, the 27-year-old is averaging 16.3 points and a team-high 7.1 assists in 48 games. 

"I recently tested positive for the Covid virus and am currently in quarantine," he said in a statement.

"I'm doing well, feeling well and progressing well. I plan to join my team-mates in Orlando for the resumption of the NBA season and playoffs." 

Brogdon was poised to play upon the season's resumption having recovered from leg and hip injuries that sidelined him for Indiana's final three games before the NBA season was halted.

The Pacers (39-26) were in control of the Eastern Conference's fifth seed when the season went on pause on March 11 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

They will be one of the 22 NBA teams set for the restart at the bubble at Walt Disney World in July.

Los Angeles Lakers guard Avery Bradley will not be part of the NBA's restart in Orlando next month.

Bradley has a six-year-old son who has a history of struggling to recover from respiratory illnesses and would have been unlikely to be medically cleared to enter the bubble at Walt Disney World after the first round of the playoffs, when family members will be permitted to join players.

"As committed to my Lakers team-mates and the organisation as I am, I ultimately play basketball for my family," Bradley told ESPN.

"And so, at a time like this, I can't imagine making any decision that might put my family's health and wellbeing at even the slightest risk.

"As promised also, I will use this time away to focus on the formation of projects to help strengthen my communities."

Bradley stands to lose a projected $650,000 in salary by sitting out the season's resumption.

The Lakers enter the 22-team restart with the best record in the Western Conference. Bradley has been a key two-way player this season, averaging 8.6 points and 2.3 rebounds.

The 10-year veteran joins Washington's Davis Bertans and Portland's Trevor Ariza as players who have already said they will not participate in the restart in Orlando. Bertans and Ariza, however, are on teams currently on the outside of the playoff picture.

NBA champions the Toronto Raptors have flown out to Florida as they prepare for the 2019-20 season's planned restart.

The NBA is planning to resume the campaign at Walt Disney World Resort via a 22-team format in Orlando next month after the league was suspended in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Toronto travelled to Florida on Monday, with the Raptors to be based in Fort Myers until entering the NBA campus at Disney in early July for the remainder of the season.

"In keeping with NBA and team safety protocols, there will be no group workouts during this phase of return to play, and strict protocols have been designed to ensure this initial level of access will take place in a safe, controlled, and healthy way," the Raptors said in a statement.

Group workouts will only begin once teams have reported to the NBA campus at Walt Disney World Resort.

The Raptors (46-18) were second in the Eastern Conference prior the COVID-19 crisis, behind the NBA-leading Milwaukee Bucks (53-12).

June 20 is a day LeBron James will remember fondly, World Cup finals were settled and arguably the most famous penalty technique was first introduced. 

James was once again the king of Miami after leading the Heat to NBA glory in a thrilling series against the San Antonio Spurs. 

New Zealand made history at the first Rugby World Cup, while this day also saw Australia completely dominant in cricket's showpiece event.

Look back at some fond moments from years gone by on this day. 


1976 - The Panenka is born as Czechoslovakia celebrate

Defending European champions and reigning World Cup holders West Germany were overwhelming favourites for the final of Euro 1976. 

While Jan Svehlik and Karol Dobias put Czechoslovakia into a two-goal lead after 25 minutes, Dieter Muller and Bernd Holzenbein both scored to force extra-time in a 2-2 draw. 

When the additional minutes could not split the teams, a penalty shoot-out was required. Uli Hoeness' miss presented Antonin Panenka with a golden opportunity to seal glory.

His long run-up and delicate chip deceived goalkeeper Sepp Maier, leading to the birth of the famous Panenka penalty and earning a 5-3 victory shoot-out victory.


1987 - New Zealand win first final 

A near 50,000-strong crowd roared New Zealand on to victory on home soil at Eden Park in the first ever Rugby World Cup final. 

The fearsome All Blacks were too good for Scotland and Wales in the previous knockout rounds, but France had stunned Australia to provide hope of an upset. 

Instead, it was one-way traffic. Michael Jones, captain David Kirk and John Kirwan scored tries in a convincing 29-9 win over Les Bleus.  

Surprisingly, New Zealand would not be crowned champions again until 2011. 


1999 – Australia Lord it over Pakistan

The 1999 Cricket World Cup final was about as one-sided as it gets as Australia thrashed Pakistan by eight wickets. 

An enigmatic Pakistan side were skittled for a meagre 132 in 39 overs after surprisingly opting to bat first at Lord's, leg-spinner Shane Warne returning figures of 4-33. 

Australia – led by Steve Waugh - rattled off the chase with a whopping 29.5 overs to spare, Adam Gilchrist celebrating a half-century in the process. 

It marked the first of three consecutive World Cup triumphs for the Australians, as they reigned again under the captaincy of Ricky Ponting in both 2003 and 2007. 


2013 – LeBron's Heat reign again after Spurs epic

For the second straight year, LeBron James was named NBA Finals MVP as the Miami Heat retained their title by defeating the Spurs. 

It was the third straight year a star-studded Heat roster including Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh had made it through to the Finals. 

A see-saw series had seen the Spurs lead on three occasions but a dramatic 103-100 overtime win in Game 6, considered by many to be one of the great playoff contests in NBA history, set up a decider. 

James duly put up a game-high 37 points and provided 12 rebounds and four assists in a 95-88 triumph. 

The Spurs would gain revenge a year later, which proved to be James' last season in Miami as he returned to the Cleveland Cavaliers, the team who had drafted him first overall in 2003. 

Rory McIlroy and LeBron James produced memorable moments on June 19, a date that means much to England cricket fans but one their Australian counterparts will always want to forget.

McIlroy was magnificent as he won the 2011 U.S. Open, five years before James and the Cleveland Cavaliers completed a memorable triumph over the Golden State Warriors.

As for the Ashes rivals, England's batsmen were undoubtedly on top in 2018 as they put Australia's poor bowlers to the sword in Nottingham.

Take a look back at some of the memorable moments that have happened on this day through the years.

 

2011: Major breakthrough for McIlroy

Just over two months after enduring a last-round meltdown that ended his hopes of Masters glory at Augusta, McIlroy secured his first major - and in some style, too.

The Congressional course was no match for the Northern Irishman, who left the field fighting it out for second place - Jason Day would eventually finish a distant runner-up - and had the statisticians trawling through the records.

McIlroy's eight-shot triumph was the biggest margin of victory in the tournament's history, while his final score of 16 under was a record for strokes under par (a feat matched by Brooks Koepka in 2017). 

2016: Cavs stun Warriors to reign at last

Having returned for a second spell with Cleveland, the team that drafted him back in 2003, James finally steered the Cavs to glory in the NBA Finals.

The Golden State Warriors appeared on course to retain their title when they led the best-of-seven series 3-1. LeBron, however, had other ideas, inspiring his team to rally from the brink of defeat to claim the city's first professional sports title in 52 years.

His triple-double was influential in deciding the outcome of Game 7, though his most notable play was 'The Block' on Andre Iguodala late in proceedings. Yet it was Kyrie Irving who made the key shot with just under a minute remaining, sinking a three-pointer that helped clinch a 93-89 triumph.

2018: Australia suffer as England run up the score

Going, going gone. England's one-day team made history in the third match of the series against Australia, smashing their way to a world record total in the 50-over format.

Jonny Bairstow and Alex Hales both made centuries as the hosts amassed 481-6 at Trent Bridge. Captain Eoin Morgan weighed in with a rapid 67, helping England ease past their previous highest score of 444-3, made against Pakistan just under two years earlier at the same venue.

Australia could only muster 237 all out in reply to suffer their heaviest ever loss in ODI cricket in terms of runs (242 runs, to be precise). They would end up being swept in the series too, going down 5-0.

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban hopes NBA players are allowed to kneel during the national anthem.

NBA rules state players, coaches and trainers "must stand and line up in a dignified posture along the foul lines during the playing of the American and/or Canadian national anthems".

However, several NFL players have said they plan to kneel during the anthem, a protest against police brutality and racism initially led by former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick starting in 2016.

Cuban wants NBA players to be given the choice if they want to do likewise during their season.

"Whether it's holding their arm up in the air, whether it's taking a knee, whatever it is, I don't think this is an issue of respect or disrespect to the flag or to the anthem or to our country," he told ESPN on Thursday.

"I think this is more a reflection of our players' commitment to this country and the fact that it's so important to them that they're willing to say what's in their heart and do what they think is right.

"I'll defer to [commissioner] Adam [Silver] on any final judgments and [National Basketball Players Association executive director] Michele Roberts.

"But the reality is, my hope is we'll let the players do exactly what they think is the right thing to do."

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