Nicolas Jarry has been banned for 11 months after testing positive for two prohibited substances but is free to resume playing from November after the ITF backdated his punishment.

Chilean Jarry was provisionally suspended on January 14 after a urine sample taken at the Davis Cup contained the anabolic agent ligandrol and anabolic steroid stanozolol.

Jarry protested his innocence saying at the time that "the levels of these substances are so incredibly low that they are equivalent to trillionths of a gram, levels so low that neither substance could have provided me any performance-enhancing benefit".

Jarry said he had consumed "multi-vitamins made in Brazil" that his doctor said would be "guaranteed to be free from banned substances". The ITF has accepted his version of events and backdated his suspension.

"Mr. Jarry was charged with an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme (presence of a Prohibited Substance in a Player’s Sample) on 4 January 2020 and was provisionally suspended on 14 January 2020," an ITF statement read. 

"The ITF accepted Mr. Jarry's explanation as to how the SARM LGD-4033 and stanozolol entered his system and that he bore No Significant Fault or Negligence for his violation. Mr. Jarry was entitled to have his period of ineligibility backdated to start on the date of last occurrence of his violation. 

"This is Mr. Jarry's first Anti-Doping Rule Violation. The decision determines that: (1) Mr. Jarry has committed a violation of the Programme; (2) he must serve a period of ineligibility of eleven months; and (3) that period of ineligibility is backdated to start on 16 December 2019, and so ending at midnight on 15 November 2020. 

"In accordance with Programme articles 9.1 and 10.8, all ranking points and prize money obtained by Mr. Jarry at the Event and subsequent events are disqualified."

Jarry was ranked as high as 38th in July, the same month he won his first and only ATP Tour singles title at the Swedish Open and is now ranked 89th. He has also won two doubles trophies.

A statement on his Twitter account read: 

"With a clear conscience I tell you that we were able to prove in the investigation carried out by the ITF that the prohibited substances identified in the test, were originated in the Brazilian laboratory which cross-contaminated my vitamins.

"I have accepted the 11-month sanction offered by the ITF."

Novak Djokovic revealed he was opposed to vaccines and would be forced into a decision if it became compulsory to allow him to compete amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The ATP Tour is suspended until at least July 13 due to COVID-19, while Wimbledon was cancelled for the first time since World War II.

Due to travel restrictions around the world, tennis may be one of the last sports to resume, if it is even able to restart in 2020.

Djokovic, the 17-time grand slam champion and world number one, said he was against vaccines and would be forced into a decision if it became compulsory for travel.

"Personally, I'm not for vaccines and I wouldn't like it if I'm forced to have a vaccine so I can travel," he said during a Facebook chat with fellow Serbian athletes on Sunday.

"If they make it compulsory, what would happen? Then I will have to decide if I'm going to or not.

"I have my own thoughts about it now and if that will change, I don't know, but that directly impacts on my job – on professional tennis – and whether I'll travel or not travel."

Medical experts have suggested a vaccine for coronavirus could be at least 12 months away.

There have been more than 2.4 million confirmed cases of coronavirus with the death toll exceeding 165,000.

Rafael Nadal's academy is considering launching a competition at its campus with the ATP Tour suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The ATP and WTA Tour seasons are on hold until at least July 13 due to COVID-19, which has killed more than 160,000 people worldwide.

But having held talks with ATP chairman Andrea Gaudenzi to offer facilities for training, the Rafa Nadal Academy in Mallorca is looking at becoming "a campus where elite players can reside, train and compete between themselves in matches that will be televised so that fans around the world can enjoy them".

"Right now tennis takes a back seat and the most important thing is everyone's health, but if in the coming months the academy can be used to help other professional players, I'd be delighted if they could come to train and also to compete," Nadal said in a statement on Saturday.

"Although we have no upcoming tournaments, I think that competing among ourselves would help us maintain our game for when the Tour restarts."

Similarly, Serena Williams' coach Patrick Mouratoglou announced the launch of the Ultimate Tennis Showdown (UTS), starting without fans in attendance on May 16.

In a statement, it said fans would be able to interact with players in real time and listen to every conversation between competitors and coaches.

"The UTS is simply meant to be an alternative to what already exists," Mouratoglou said.

"It is a platform created to showcase the incredible talent, athleticism and personalities of the wide range of tennis players. It offers a new and innovative approach, targeting a younger tennis audience and proposes a different way to distribute the money among the players."

World number 10 David Goffin is scheduled to play Alexei Popyrin – whose father Alex is a UTS co-founder – in the opening match.

Novak Djokovic revealed he had spoken to Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal about a relief fund that would see up to $4.5million distributed to lower-ranked players.

The ATP Tour is suspended until at least July 13 due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 160,000 people worldwide.

There are financial concerns for several sports, including tennis – particularly lower-ranked players with the season paused.

ATP Player Council president Djokovic said he had discussed a relief fund with fellow members Federer and Nadal.

"I spoke to Roger and Rafa a few days ago," he said during an Instagram Live with Stan Wawrinka on Saturday.

"We had a long conversation about the near future of tennis, what's going to happen, how we can contribute and how we can help, especially lower-ranked guys who are obviously struggling the most of anybody.

"Majority of the players who are ranked between, whatever, 200 and 250 to 700 or 1,000, don't have federation support, don't have sponsors so they are completely independent and kind of left alone.

"I'm really glad that ATP, grand slams now most likely, and players, hopefully, if we all get together, will contribute collectively to the player relief fund that ATP will distribute using certain models and criteria."

Djokovic added: "Right now, it looks like there's going to be hopefully somewhere between $3 million and $4.5 million, there is going to be distributed to these lower-ranking guys."

A 17-time grand slam champion, Djokovic said tennis needed to respect its lower-ranked players.

"I'm really glad that the tennis ecosystem is coming together because I think everyone realises the importance of the base of the tennis and these guys that are ranked from 250 onwards," he said.

"They are the ones that make the grassroots of tennis, that make the future of tennis and I feel we have to be united, we have to support them, we have to show them that they are not forgotten, that we are there for them.

"But also I feel we have to send a message to the younger generations that are taking in consideration to be professional players and to show them that they can live out of tennis even at the times when there is a pandemic and there is a financial crisis, that they still can rely on the support of the top guys of the ATP as a governing body, of the ITF, of grand slams."

Novak Djokovic insisted he did not expect to have the crowd on his side when playing Roger Federer or Rafael Nadal.

A 17-time grand slam champion, Djokovic is still behind Federer (20) and Nadal (19) on the all-time list for majors won by men, while the Serbian still struggles for support compared to the Swiss and Spaniard.

In an Instagram Live with Stan Wawrinka on Saturday, Djokovic discussed why that was the case, accepting he would often find himself on the wrong side of the support against the duo.

"For sure one thing is that Roger is arguably the greatest player of all-time," he said.

"He's the guy that is liked around the world so I don't expect, to be honest, in most of the cases, as long as he's playing, the crowd to be majority on my side. Some places, maybe, but most of the places are going to support Roger and I'm okay with that because it's Roger.

"It's very similar situation with Rafa so it's hard for me to answer to that question. Why is it like that? Am I contributing to that in a negative way that I'm taking away the crowd support for me? I don't think so.

"I think it's more just the greatness of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal and not just them as tennis players, but them as people, as very charismatic, nice guys, humble guys, great champions that have made a huge mark in our sport and I am part of their era, so in one way I am lucky and in another way maybe not so much."

Djokovic asked Wawrinka – a three-time grand slam champion – for his opinion on the matter.

The Swiss felt tennis needed something closer to a villain, a role the 32-year-old Djokovic assumed.

"I think it's a bit of for sure what you said that they are amazing champions like you are," Wawrinka said.

"I think in your young age you were a bit different of course like we all are and they took this spot already of the nice player, humble, always fair play and all. In a movie you cannot have three good guys, you need someone who's a bit against, you know what I mean? I'm saying that with a lot of respect.

"When you were all three younger, that's the direction that everybody took a little bit and now it affects a little bit right now."

Andy Murray is convinced Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal are the greatest men's tennis players of all time - just don't ask him to put them in order.

The Scot might have had a stack more grand slam titles had it not been for the 'Big Three' of the modern era.

As well as his two Wimbledon triumphs, two Olympic golds and a 2012 US Open success, Murray has lost five major finals to Djokovic and three to Federer.

While Murray feels the likes of Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors would be competitive in this age, he sees his direct rivals as the best there have ever been.

Murray told Djokovic in an Instagram Live chat on Friday: "The thing that's special now is you have three guys who are playing at the same time, so you can compare them because - I wrote it down - you played 55 times against Rafa and 50 times against Roger, and Roger and Rafa played 40 times.

"So you have that many matches between the best players in the biggest tournaments - so you actually don't have to compare the generations, and I think the best three players are playing now.

"It's difficult to judge it. We don't know what's going to happen in the future, so we don't know what everyone is going to finish on slam-wise and how many matches everyone will have played and won against each other."

Addressing Serbian star Djokovic, Murray said: "Also in this conversation, which is maybe different to other sports because we have the different surfaces, is that to me right now you have Rafa's record on clay nobody competes with, Roger's current record at Wimbledon is the best, and your record on hard courts is the best.

"So because we have these different surfaces, it's difficult, and when people ask me what's the toughest match in your career, who are the hardest guys to play against, I'd be like... I feel like I'm competing against the best hard-court player ever, I've competed against the best clay-court player ever and the best grass-court player ever, so for me it depends on the surface."

Federer has 20 grand slam singles titles, Nadal has 19 and Djokovic landed his 17th at the Australian Open at the start of this season. The campaign is now on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Whenever tennis resumes, there will be a host of young players vying with the old guard for the biggest titles in the sport.

As Djokovic pointed out: "We are also not that young anymore.

"You have guys like Dominic Thiem, [Stefanos] Tsitsipas and [Alexander] Zverev, these guys they're maturing so quickly and they're ready - they're ready to get the grand slam titles and they're very close."

But Djokovic suspects it will be hard to budge the likes of himself, Federer and Nadal, as well as Murray and the Scot's fellow three-slam winner Stan Wawrinka.

He said: "When it comes to slams, I think it seems like we - including yourself and [Wawrinka] - you turn to another gear, because I think every next slam that keeps coming I feel more comfortable playing in. And I feel there's always even a bigger mental or emotional edge over the young guys coming in.

"Because you've played so many times you have the experience, you feel good in your own skin, it's really hard that anything really surprises you."

Novak Djokovic has revealed his pain at failing to land an Olympic gold medal to add to his 17 grand slam titles.

The Serbian would have been hoping to take the top step on the podium in Tokyo this year, yet the coronavirus pandemic means the Games have been delayed by 12 months.

Twice he has reached semi-finals at the Olympics, in Beijing in 2008 and at London 2012, but Djokovic lost to the eventual champion both times, Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray ending his hopes.

As top seed at Rio 2016 he was hampered by a minor injury and fell in the first round to Juan Martin del Potro, who reached the final but lost to Murray.

In an Instagram conversation with Murray on Friday, both men considered which match they most regretted losing.

"I think it would be Olympic Games, so maybe the match I played against you in London or maybe Rafa in Beijing in 2008," Djokovic said.

"I would say Olympic Games because for sure I was very fortunate to have the great success in my career and win all four slams and all Masters series.

"I did win bronze in Beijing, but I was really feeling good about myself in '16 in Rio - Del Potro then went on to play with you in the finals."

Looking back on that Del Potro match, Djokovic remembered: "It was a very tough match - two tie-breaks.

"Two days before the match, I was practising and I was feeling great. I lost third round at Wimbledon so I had enough time to get ready.

"I won in Canada and came to Rio full of confidence, I had the best 15 months of my career behind me before Rio."

A minor wrist niggle after practising doubles dealt Djokovic the setback that meant there was a significant factor involved in the Del Potro defeat.

No such injury issues affected the Beijing and London losses, leading Djokovic to tell Murray: "If I had a chance to turn back time and change the outcomes, it would probably be Rio or London with you in '12."

Murray said his own big regret was losing the French Open final to Djokovic in 2016.

As well as beating Djokovic in two slam finals, Murray has lost to his great rival five times in such matches - four times at the Australian Open and once in Paris.

To Djokovic's surprise, it was the French loss that eats away at Murray.

The Scot said: "Just in terms of the way I played on clay, it was the hardest one for me to adapt to, that I think that would have been for me my biggest achievement if I'd managed to win the French.

"Obviously, Australia's been pretty painful thanks to you over the years, but if I could change one I'd take the French Open off you."

The Laver Cup has been postponed by a year after French Open organisers controversially moved their grand slam to dates that clashed with the team event.

Roger Federer, whose management runs the Laver Cup, said he would compete at the 2021 Laver Cup which will be held from September 24 to 26 in the US city of Boston.

Federer, a record 20-time grand slam winner, will be 40 years old by the time the delayed event comes around.

Boston was due to stage the Laver Cup this year from September 25 to 27, but French Open chiefs last month declared their postponed tournament would switch from May to a September 20 start.

The move by Roland Garros chiefs caused ructions in the tennis world, and the Laver Cup has been a casualty, conceding it was "inevitable" it would have to make way.

Laver Cup chairman Tony Godsick said: "We needed to make a decision now on our event.

"We know our passionate fans will be disappointed that they have to wait an extra year for the Laver Cup in Boston, but this is the responsible course of action, necessitated by the emerging calendar conflicts."

Federer said: "It's unfortunate that the Laver Cup has to be pushed back a year, but at this stage it's the right thing to do for everyone concerned."

The coronavirus pandemic has put the tennis season on hold, with no events to take place before mid-July. Wimbledon has been cancelled and August's WTA Rogers Cup event in Montreal has also been called off.

Laver Cup chiefs pointed in their statement on Friday to the French Open's decision and said since that came on March 17 they had assessed the situation along with stakeholders Tennis Australia and the United States Tennis Association, and the ATP, which runs the men's tour.

The statement said: "Ultimately though, the international tennis schedule precluded the ability of the organisers to stage the event and therefore there was no reason to delay the inevitable decision."

Team Europe, including Federer and Rafael Nadal, won the 2019 Laver Cup by beating Team World in Geneva.

US Open organisers plan to make a decision in June about staging this year's tournament - but it is "highly unlikely" to go ahead behind closed doors.

The coronavirus pandemic has caused both the ATP and WTA seasons to be halted, while the remaining grand slams scheduled for 2020 have also been affected by the health crisis.

While the French Open was switched to a date later in the calendar - the clay-court event will now begin on September 20 - Wimbledon has been cancelled.

The main draw at Flushing Meadows is due to start on August 31 and the United States Tennis Association (USTA) are still hopeful play will be possible, though much will depend on how the situation develops in the coming weeks.

"Time is on our side at this point as the last grand slam," USTA chief of operations Mike Dowse said on a conference call, according to the New York Post.

"Obviously our ambition is to run the tournament. Having said that, it won't be the driving factor. The driving factor is the health and well-being of our players, fans and staff.

"We've set a time frame about June to make that decision."

On the possibility of no fans being present, Dowse said: "Playing without spectators – we're not taking anything off the table – but it's highly unlikely.

"It's not really in the spirit of the celebration of tennis. We really don't see that as an option.

"Unless the medical experts come back with a foolproof way of doing a safe tournament without fans, we may look at it at that point."

Rafael Nadal and Bianca Andreescu are the reigning US Open singles champions.

Rafael Nadal would jump at the chance to play competitive tennis behind closed doors, after admitting he struggled to handle the onset of the coronavirus crisis.

The 19-time grand slam winner is sidelined at home in Mallorca and has predicted the tennis tour will remain on hold for a long time to come.

Nadal says public health is the most important matter, but he revealed in a radio interview on Wednesday that he has been speaking to Novak Djokovic about how tennis recovers.

Speaking to radio station Cadena Cope in a Red Cross fund-raising broadcast, Nadal said: "I am dealing with quarantine better than three weeks ago, the human being has the capacity to adapt.

"In the beginning, the terrible news made me sad and took away my desire to wake up, all day watching TV and there was nothing positive. As days went by, I came back to my routines, with double sessions every day to keep fit.

"I came back from [the cancelled ATP Tour event at] Indian Wells on a Wednesday and that Saturday the state of alarm was official. It was a shock. Knowing what was happening in Italy, I knew it was coming to Spain.

"In Indian Wells I was sleeping [at the home of] the tournament owner, who is a very connected person, and at his house I was prevented from hugging anyone and was keeping distance."

The tennis season is on hold until mid-July at the earliest, with Wimbledon cancelled and the French Open postponed until a September start.

Nadal, a record 12-time Roland Garros champion, turns 34 in June.

He said: "I am not worrying about tennis now. I do physical work to not deteriorate my body.

"Tennis is not like football, our sport involves more travelling. Until there is [a] cure, the situation will be really complicated. We need to be responsible.

"I cannot see an official tournament at short or medium-term.

"Health comes first. But if it would be possible to play behind closed doors, I would be very happy. I have talked many hours with Novak to see how we can help our sport."

Serbian Djokovic, who won his 17th grand slam at this year's Australian Open, is spending the quarantine period at his Marbella home.

He also spoke to the radio station, and stressed he would not want a decision to resume the tennis tour to be taken in haste.

Djokovic, who has his 33rd birthday in May, said: "Tennis behind closed doors? It depends. It is not an easy decision. It is bigger than our sport, this decision.

"I am ready to play, but this will come in the next months. I am lucky to be with my family. Normally we are always travelling."

Matteo Berrettini still gets goosebumps when he thinks about being complimented by Roger Federer.

Despite starting 2019 outside the top 50, Berrettini ended the year with a place in the ATP Finals as the world number eight.

Titles in Budapest and Stuttgart, an appearance in the final in Munich and a run to the US Open semi-finals proved key to the Italian's remarkable ascendancy.

His impressive rise did not go unnoticed by Federer, who praised Berrettini's performances when they were in action at the Halle Open.

The 20-time major champion offered more words of encouragement when their first on-court meeting ended in Federer triumphing 6-1 6-2 6-2 in the fourth round of Wimbledon.

Berrettini told Stats Perform: "Before Wimbledon I played Stuttgart and Halle. I won Stuttgart whose defending champions was Federer.

"In Halle I met him and he complimented me. Before we only exchanged some hellos but to be complimented by him still gives me goosebumps.

"We didn't speak during Wimbledon because we were in the same half of the draw, so no tips. But then he told me: 'Congratulations for your grass season. Go on like this and you will go high.'

"Then we met again in London for the ATP Finals. He was very kind because we chatted during the famous boat trip from the hotel to the arena. We chatted about the holidays and his plans.

"The relationship with all of them is so weird. I grew up looking up to them, you know. But the relationship is good, they are special."

Berrettini will not get to continue his development on grass this season with the whole swing, including Wimbledon, cancelled due to the coronavirus.

The 23-year-old is disappointed he will not get to play at the All England Club, having gained a greater affinity for the surface following his displays in 2019.

"Without a shadow of a doubt, Wimbledon is my favourite slam. I reached the US Open semis but I regard Wimbledon as the temple of our sport," said Berrettini.

"I always say that in this place even people who are not experts or passionate about tennis, go there and get keen to be participating and playing. It is wonderful and its cancellation is very tough for us.

"It is a peculiar situation. It is on grass and in England where the weather is mostly rainy, they can play only in certain dates. They can't move it to November because in London it would be five degrees. That's why the cancellation.

"Until last year, though, my relationship with grass was not ideal at all. But since the Davis Cup tie in India, everything changed for me.

"Maybe I improved in some aspects, but I didn't even realise at the end of the season I had played many high-level games on that surface and now it is one of my favourite."

Tim Henman believes the enforced break from tennis could help Andy Murray, saying he hoped the Brit had "a few Wimbledons left in him".

Wimbledon was cancelled this year for the first time since World War II due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Murray was said to be nearing a return from a hip injury, having last played at the Davis Cup Finals in 2019.

Henman feels the break could be beneficial for two-time Wimbledon champion Murray, who turns 33 in May.

"He has missed so much tennis but perhaps [the break] will give him the opportunity – if his body and his hip enable him – to play longer, in age terms," he told UK media, via The Guardian.

"I remember playing with Agassi after Andre had 18 months out, for very different reasons, but he came back fresh and invigorated to play. He kept going until he was 36.

"In those days that was old for a top tennis player. I stopped when I was 33 and that was pretty old at the time, but with training techniques and injury prevention, players are certainly playing longer.

"You would like to think that if Andy's body permits and he still has the motivation that I think he does there can still definitely be a few Wimbledons left in him yet."

A player who appears closer to the end of his career is Roger Federer, with the 20-time grand slam champion turning 39 this year.

Henman – an All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (AELTC) board member – said the Swiss great, who underwent knee surgery in February, would be shattered by the cancellation of Wimbledon.

"Someone like Federer, coming to the end of his career, is devastated but understands the decision," said Henman, a four-time Wimbledon semi-finalist.

"It will affect a lot of people in a lot of different ways."

ATP chairman Andrea Gaudenzi said there were "50 calendar options" for this year, but admits tennis could be one of the last sports to resume.

The ATP and WTA Tours have been suspended through July 13 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

While Wimbledon was cancelled, the French Open was pushed back until September amid uncertainty over when, and if, play will get underway in 2020.

Gaudenzi said tennis may have to wait longer than other sports to resume due to the amount of travel.

"We have 3,000-4,000 people coming from all over the world and therefore tennis could be one of the last sports to return," he told Sky Sport on Friday.

"We have 50 calendar options. Nothing is yet decided. We will make decisions late May.

"There are assumptions [like] playing on the red clay after the US Open if all goes well and then continue with the normal season – in Asia, indoors and close with the [ATP] Finals in London."

There have been more than 1.6 million cases of coronavirus worldwide, with the death toll exceeding 102,000.

Novak Djokovic again showed he is a match for an Andy Murray challenge - even in a lockdown.

The Serbian has had the better of their tennis head-to-head record, even if his 25-11 winning record includes defeats to the Briton in finals of the US Open and Wimbledon.

With on-court rivalries on hold while tennis endures a hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic, Murray looked to add a touch of spice this week when he challenged ATP and WTA stars to take part in a '100-volley challenge'.

Murray and wife Kim strung together an impressive century, and on Friday came filmed proof that men's world number one Djokovic had also reached the target with his wife, Jelena.

Spending more time than usual at home, the pair donned sports gear in their yard and showed impressive shared skills, before Djokovic appeared to hit their tennis ball over a wall once the hundred volleys were complete.

He kissed his wife on the hand, and said: "Thanks Kim, thanks Andy, for challenging us.

"If you've got any more challenges, we're here, we're available, we've got all the time in the world, this is the funnest part of the day. See you, guys."

On Instagram, where Djokovic posted the video of the volley exchange, the 17-time grand slam winner jokingly described it as "too easy".

Roger Federer challenged celebrities and fans to join in a volleying drill on social media on Tuesday.

With the ATP Tour suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic, the 20-time grand slam champion looked to engage fans on social media.

In a video posted on Twitter, Federer – wearing a panama hat – volleyed a ball repeatedly against a wall at close range, and asked others to do likewise.

"Here's a helpful solo drill. Let's see what you got!" the Swiss great wrote.

"Reply back with a video and I'll provide some tips. Choose your hat wisely #tennisathome."

Many fans took up the challenge, with Federer replying to several efforts.

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