Kyle Edmund has been named as the fifth and final player in Great Britain's line up for the Davis Cup finals.

Having endured a poor run of form, losing eight matches on the bounce, former British number one Edmund rallied with successive victories at the Paris Masters earlier this week.

He eventually fell to world number one Novak Djokovic in the round of 16, but his displays against Ricardas Berankis and Diego Schwartzman were enough to cement his place in Leon Smith's squad for the new-look event later this month.

Andy Murray had already been named in Great Britain's team after his triumph at the European Open, alongside his brother Jamie, Neal Skupski and Dan Evans.

"I'm delighted to name Kyle as the final nominated player to our Davis Cup team," Great Britain captain Smith said of Edmund, who saw off competition from Cameron Norrie.

"While Kyle has had a tough few months, he showed at the Paris Masters what level of tennis he is capable of producing.

"It's been a difficult decision to make as Cam Norrie has had a very good year on tour and is finishing the year ranked around number 50 in the world.

"It's a strong position for our team to be in when we have such high-quality players vying for selection."

Novak Djokovic may have sounded croaky but the four-time Paris Masters champion stayed in the hunt for another triumph in the French capital.

A 7-6 (9-7) 6-1 victory over Great Britain's Kyle Edmund carried the Serbian through to a tough-looking quarter-final against Stefanos Tsitsipas.

Greek youngster Tsitsipas was a 6-3 6-4 winner against Australian Alex de Minaur, while Rafael Nadal dug deep for a gritty 6-4 6-4 win over Stan Wawrinka.

Dominic Thiem and Alexander Zverev were significant casualties, as the fifth and sixth seeds suffered respective defeats to Grigor Dimitrov and Denis Shapovalov.

And there was plenty of French joy, as Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Gael Monfils thrilled the home crowds with dramatic three-set victories.

Djokovic eyes revenge

Djokovic lost to Tsitsipas in the quarter-finals of the Shanghai Masters in October but will fancy his chances of avenging that loss on Friday.

Despite his voice sounding far from healthy, Djokovic is feeling better after battling illness this week, and he is positive about the state of his game.

"The second set was the best set I've played so far in the tournament," Djokovic said, according to the ATP website. "Finished off with a winner, finished off with amazing return game. So, of course, the sensation is very positive. And I'm convinced that I'm headed in the right direction so that tomorrow will be even better."

The 32-year-old hopes to end the year at number one in the world rankings for the sixth time, even though Nadal is certain to be in pole position heading into the ATP Finals in London.

 

Tsonga next for Nadal

Nadal was not at his best against Wawrinka, yet he still extended his dominance over the Swiss three-time grand slam winner with a 19th win in their 22nd meeting.

He took two of the three break points he engineered to stay in the hunt for a first Paris Masters title. Given his immense success elsewhere - his 35 Masters 1000 titles is a record and he has landed 12 French Open titles - Nadal's limited success in Paris is a shortcoming he will be eager to address.

He should have enough for Tsonga on Friday, but the veteran Frenchman has come out punching this week and is beginning to look like the player who was a top-10 fixture for so long.

Tsonga landed a 2-6 6-4 7-6 (8-6) victory over Germany's Jan-Lennard Struff and said: "When you play the best, it's always beneficial and it's not important whether you win or lose.

"When you play Rafa in the first round, it's a problem. If you play Rafa in the quarter-finals, it's normal. Of course, it's better for me to meet Rafa in quarter-finals after having played a few matches rather than during the first round."

Monfils keeps ATP Finals hopes alive

There is one place to fill at the season-ending ATP Finals, and Monfils is desperate to sustain his run this week to stay in contention.

After a 4-6 6-4 6-1 win against Romanian Radu Albot, the 33-year-old Parisian is on the brink but still not quite there and must see off Shapovalov to earn his ticket to London ahead of Matteo Berrettini.

Given Shapovalov's 6-2 5-7 6-2 win against Alexander Zverev, that could be a tall order for Monfils, whose French compatriot Jeremy Chardy could not boost the home contingent in the final eight, going down 6-7 (4-7) 6-4 7-6 (8-6) in a nail-biting thriller against Chilean Cristian Garin.

Despite the defeat, Zverev is certain to be involved in the English capital after sealing his spot on Wednesday.

Rafael Nadal edged past Stan Wawrinka at the Paris Masters as he extended his dominance in their career rivalry and moved a step closer to the title that has always eluded him.

There was little between the players, both multiple grand slam winners, but Nadal seized on two of the three break chances he created to snatch a 6-4 6-4 victory.

A 19th win in 22 matches against the Swiss took Nadal nearer a 36th Masters 1000 title and the end-of-year number one ranking.

Curiously, though, the Spaniard has never won the indoor event in Paris, despite being a 12-time French Open champion.

The gritty win over Wawrinka sets up a quarter-final against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, who came into this tournament as a wildcard but has been inspired at his home tournament.

French veteran Tsonga has a better record against Nadal than Wawrinka can point to, winning four of their 13 previous meetings.

Nadal said of his win over Wawrinka: "I've been in a match with not many rallies. I played with some mistakes but at the same time I played well with my serve. I was able to be comfortable with my serve.

"On the return, it was difficult today to find opportunities, but the important thing is when I had opportunities I played with the right determination, so I'm very happy. It's an important victory against a very tough opponent."

Assessing the threat posed by Tsonga, who at 34 is a year his senior, US Open champion Nadal told Amazon Prime: "He's a tough one. He's a great player and let's see. I know I'll have to play my best."

Nadal will take over at number one in the rankings next week, whatever happens in Paris, but he will also be assured of top spot come the season's end if he carries off the title.

Novak Djokovic set up a tantalising clash with Stefanos Tsitsipas in the quarter-finals of the Paris Masters by seeing off Kyle Edmund.

The world number one, who will lose top spot to Rafael Nadal next week, appeared to be under the weather but ground out a 7-6 (9-7) 6-1 victory.

He growled through a post-match interview, his voice indicating all was not entirely well, but Djokovic still had enough in the tank to see off his British opponent.

Edmund ended a losing streak of eight matches when winning through the first two rounds in Paris, and the former top-20 player pushed Djokovic hard in the opening set.

Neither man registered a break, but the contest became one-sided once Djokovic nudged ahead. He clinched his 50th match win of the season in a hurry, claiming 12 of the final 14 points.

Now Tsitsipas awaits the 16-time grand slam champion, with the 21-year-old Greek having won two of his three previous matches against the all-time great.

The most recent of those meetings came in Shanghai just three weeks ago, when Tsitsipas prevailed in a deciding set.

Tsitsipas set up the fourth match in their rivalry by earning a 6-3 6-4 success against Australian Alex de Minaur.

Alexander Zverev qualified for the ATP Finals when Jo-Wilfried Tsonga beat Matteo Berrettini, while Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic reached the third round of the Paris Masters on Wednesday.

Zverev will return to London to defend his title next month and Berrettini is in danger of missing out after he was beaten 6-4 6-3 by home favourite Tsonga.

Tsonga's compatriot Gael Monfils remained in contention for the eighth and final place in the season-ending showpiece by winning an all-French encounter with Benoit Paire 6-4 7-6 (7-4).

Roberto Bautista Agut, David Goffin, Fabio Fognini and Diego Schwartzman can no longer qualify for the tournament at the O2 Arena after they bowed out in the French capital on day three.

Djokovic and Nadal, vying to end the year at the top of the rankings, beat Corentin Moutet and Adrian Mannarino respectively in straight sets.

 

 

FOUR STILL STANDING IN HUNT FOR FINAL LONDON SPOT

Berrettini, Monfils, Stan Wawrinka and Alex de Minaur are the remaining contenders to join Zverev in London.

Italian Berrettini's fate is out of his hands following his exit, with Monfils, Wawrinka and De Minaur able to overtake him by winning the title this weekend.

Monfils will meet Radu Albot in the third round, while Wawrinka faces a huge battle with Nadal following a straight-sets win over Marin Cilic and De Minaur dumped out Bautista Agut, setting up a showdown with Stefanos Tsitsipas.

 

NADAL SERVE LAYS FOUNDATION FOR WINNING RETURN

Second seed Nadal did not face a break point in his first main-draw match since winning the US Open.

The 19-time time major champion, who will end the season as world number one if he wins the tournament for the first time, was pleased with his return to action 10 days after marrying long-time girlfriend Maria Francisca Perello

"[I'm very happy with the way that I served." said the Spaniard, who beat Mannarino 7-5 6-4. "I didn't face a break point during the whole match, and against a player who returns well. So that means a lot. Feelings are good. To be back in this court is always special."

 

DJOKOVIC CONTENT TO 'FIND A WAY'

Djokovic knows he slipped below his usual high standards in a 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 victory over lucky loser Moutet but was simply happy to progress given he has not been feeling at his best.

"I didn't feel health-wise 100 per cent in the last couple of days, but it is what it is. It's not the first time I didn't play at a really high level. Lots of errors, especially in the first set," said the Serb, who saved two set points in the opening set and will face Kyle Edmund in the third round.

"First time against a young player who is talented, very quick. Returns a lot of balls back that usually other guys wouldn't get, he gets it. And he was pumped, and I respect his fighting spirit. It was a good match in the end, and I found a way to win, which in [these] circumstances... when you're not feeling your best, is important."

Rafael Nadal will face Stan Wawrinka in the third round of the Paris Masters after grinding out a straight-sets victory over Adrian Mannarino in his first match as a married man.

The 19-time grand slam champion showed signs of rustiness seven weeks after his last main-draw contest - a US Open final victory over Daniil Medvedev.

Wildcard Mannarino put up a good fight in his homeland but was beaten 7-5 6-4 by the second seed.

Nadal did not face a break point and made only 11 unforced errors as he fended off world number 43 Mannarino, hitting 23 winners.

The match came 11 days after Nadal and long-time girlfriend Maria Francisca Perello married in Mallorca.

The Spaniard will end the year at the top of the rankings if he takes the title in the French capital for the first time this weekend and will be well fancied to get past Wawrinka, who has beaten him only three times in 21 meetings.

Nadal had to bide his time in a tight first set against Mannarino, with the first break point not coming until the eighth game and his fellow southpaw fended that off before levelling at 4-4.

The world number two's persistence paid off when Mannarino was broken when serving to stay in a first set that lasted just shy of an hour.

It was a similar story in the second set of a serve-dominated contest, as Nadal had only the only break-point opportunity before Mannarino fired a forehand wide on the first match point to bow out.

Novak Djokovic overcame some magical moments from Corentin Moutet at the Paris Masters to win 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 in his first match since learning he will be relinquishing his world number one ranking.

The Serbian will lose top spot to Rafael Nadal for the first time in 2019 when the latest rankings are released on Monday, regardless of what he does in France.

His battle to win that place back before the end of the year looked like it might take a huge hit when 20-year-old lucky loser Moutet broke and then had two set points in the opener, only for Djokovic to shut the door, break back and clinch the tie-break.

Djokovic then opened up a 4-1 lead in the second set and - although Moutet sealed his second break of the match - was able to wrap up victory in one hour and 47 minutes.

A pedestrian and error-strewn start from Djokovic was epitomised when he meekly found the net to hand Moutet a break and a 4-3 lead.

Moutet had to stave off four break points in the next game and then missed two opportunities to take the first set as Djokovic held and broke back to force a tie-break, which he duly won.

The 32-year-old had already raised his thumb in approval at a forehand winner slapped down the line during that decider, and he had a wry smile when Moutet lobbed him with an audacious tweener in the third game of the second set.

However, that was the only point he won during that service game as the Serbian reeled off four games in a row to take charge, though Moutet did win one break back.

With Djokovic then serving for the match shortly after, Moutet was angry when his opponent was allowed to challenge, successfully, after he had already netted his shot.

He was given the point and the chance to seal the match, which he did at the first time of asking with a fine forehand winner.

Roger Federer will not take part in the inaugural ATP Cup due to family reasons, meaning Switzerland have been withdrawn from the tournament.

The 20-time grand slam champion announced on Wednesday that he was pulling out of the new 24-team event, which will take place in Australia in January.

"It is with great regret that I am withdrawing from the inaugural ATP Cup event," world number three Federer said in a statement published on the ATP Cup's website.

"When I entered the event last month, it was a really difficult decision because it meant less time at home with the family and a fully intense start to the season.

"After much discussion with both my family and my team about the year ahead, I have decided that the extra two weeks at home will be beneficial for both my family and my tennis.

"It pains me to not be a part of the most exciting new event on the calendar, but this is the right thing to do if I want to continue to play for a longer period of time on the ATP Tour.

"I am sorry for any inconvenience or disappointment my withdrawal may cause for the fans, but I hope you can understand why I made it."

Earlier this week Federer confirmed he would take part in the Paris Masters having won a 10th title at the Swiss Indoors Basel on Sunday.

The 38-year-old's decision means Switzerland have been omitted from the ATP Cup as the nation's second-highest ranked player Henri Laaksonen is way outside the top 18.

Jeremy Chardy upset the in-form Daniil Medvedev in the second round of the ATP Paris Masters and defending champion Karen Khachanov's reign was ended by Jan-Lennard Struff on Tuesday

Medvedev arrived in Paris looking for a third successive title, but the world number four's winning run was halted at nine matches by a shock 4-6 6-2 6-4 defeat to qualifier Chardy.

The 65-ranked Chardy saved nine break points in the final set to reach the third round of the tournament in his homeland for the first time, consigning Russian Medvedev to a first loss since facing Rafael Nadal in the US Open final.

Medvedev's compatriot Khachanov also made an unexpected exit and has no chance of qualifying for the ATP Finals after he went down 7-6 (7-5) 3-6 7-5 to Struff.

Alexander Zverev, vying for one of the two remaining places in the season-ending tournament in London, accounted for Fernando Verdasco 6-1 6-3 and Radu Albot was the fourth second-round winner on day two.

Corentin Moutet will face world number one Novak Djokovic in the second round after the French lucky loser got past Dusan Lajovic 6-4 1-6 6-3, while Kyle Edmund ended his eight-match losing streak with a 6-4 6-3 victory over Ricardas Berankis.

 

CHARDY ENDS MEDVEDEV PURPLE PATCH

Medvedev had reached six consecutive finals, winning the Shanghai Masters last time out on the back of his St. Petersburg Open triumph.

The 23-year-old was brought back down to earth by the experienced Chardy, who saved 14 of 15 break points – one of which coming when he served for the match.

Medvedev had nine break-point opportunities in the final set and was made to pay for not being able to take his chances.

Chardy had not beaten a top-10 player in his previous 10 attempts but can look forward to facing John Isner or Cristian Garin in the third round.

 

INSPIRED STRUFF DETHRONES KHACHANOV

Khachanov beat Djokovic in the final last year, but was second best in his first match of the tournament this time around.

World number 36 Struff will come up against ATP Finals contender Matteo Berrettini or home wildcard Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the last 16 after hitting 43 winners in an impressive performance.

Struff and eighth seed Khachanov served 17 aces a piece, while the Warstein native won 84 per cent of points on his first serve and broke twice in the second set to ensure there will be a new champion this weekend. 

 

ZVEREV BACK IN BUSINESS AFTER BASEL FAILURE

Zverev was beaten by Taylor Fritz in his first match at the Swiss Indoors Basel last week after Medvedev denied him the title in Shanghai.

The world number six, who will be guaranteed the opportunity to defend his ATP Finals title if he reaches the decider this weekend, took just 56 minutes to send Verdasco packing.

Zverev lost just five points on serve – and only one in the second set – and will next face either Denis Shapovalov or Fabio Fognini.

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga made home advantage count as he defeated Andrey Rublev to progress into round two at the Paris Masters.

World number 35 Tsonga, who entered the final ATP Masters 1000 event of 2019 as a wildcard, proved one of the main attractions for fans on day one of the main draw and overcame Rublev 4-6 7-5 6-4 in a gruelling contest that lasted two hours and 23 minutes.

Tsonga's reward for a first victory in a Masters event in over two years is a meeting with Matteo Berrettini, who broke into the top 10 on Monday and occupies the last of two available ATP Finals spots.

Tsonga's compatriot Benoit Paire defeated Damir Dzumhur in straight sets, while Jeremy Chardy battled past Sam Querrey.

Adrian Mannarino set up a second-round tie with Rafael Nadal, while ATP Finals hopeful Alexander Zverev will go up against Fernando Verdasco, who beat Borna Coric.

There were also wins for Cristian Garin, Milos Raonic, Radu Albot, Jan-Lennard Struff and 2018 Australian Open finalist Marin Cilic.

 

TSONGA TEES UP BERRETTINI BOUT

New world number nine Berrettini sits 130 points clear of Roberto Bautista Agut in the Race for London rankings but will have to be at his best if 2008 Paris champion Tsonga can maintain the form he displayed against Rublev.

The Russian has impressed in 2019, winning in Moscow this month after victories over Dominic Thiem, Nick Kyrgios and Roger Federer over the course of the season.

His campaign came to an end with a whimper, though, as Tsonga fought back from behind to claim a first win in a Masters-level match since May 2017.

Rublev only dropped serve three times, but the second such occasion handed Tsonga set two, with an early break in the decider giving the Frenchman the chance to serve out the triumph with a first match point.

 

NADAL NEXT UP FOR MANNARINO

With Roger Federer having withdrawn from the tournament, the path looks clearer for defending champion Novak Djokovic and soon-to-be world number one Nadal to taste success.

Nadal will be taking nothing for granted against Mannarino, though, with the wildcard having made light work of NextGen ATP Finals qualifier Casper Ruud.

Two breaks in each set put Mannarino in command and he duly marched through 6-4 6-2 in one hour and 13 minutes. 

 

FRANCE'S FAN FAVOURITES PROGRESS

It was a perfect day for the French players on Monday, with all those in action making it through. Joining Tsonga and Mannarino in the second round was Chardy, who edged out fellow qualifier Querrey 5-7 6-3 7-5.

In-form Daniil Medvedev awaits Chardy, with the US Open finalist and Shanghai Masters champion aiming to sharpen up ahead of the ATP Finals.

Paire, meanwhile, will go head-to-head with French number one Gael Monfils after a 7-5 6-4 triumph over Dzumhur.

Novak Djokovic is hopeful former world number one Andy Murray can return to being a contender for the top prizes in 2020.

Murray looked set to retire after his elimination from the Australian Open but has instead staged an incredible comeback from hip surgery over the course of the season.

His remarkable return reached new heights with the defeat of Stan Wawrinka in the European Open final this month, earning him a first ATP Tour trophy in over two years.

Djokovic enjoyed an impressive record against Murray, who has won only 11 of their 36 meetings.

The current world number one, who will lose his status to Rafael Nadal at the start of November regardless of their respective displays at the Paris Masters, is now looking forward to Murray continuing his resurgence next year.

"I sincerely hope so," Djokovic told a news conference at the ATP Masters event, when asked if world number 128 Murray could rediscover the form that took him to three grand slam titles.

"I hope that he can be in contention for the top spot because tennis would profit from that and benefit. Because we know how big of a legacy he left behind and he is still creating for himself.

"Knowing what he has been through in the last three years, it was really nice to see him win a title after a long time. Only he knows the adversities that he had to face physically but also mentally.

"I know the discipline and the ethics that he has and how hardworking he is, so he definitely deserves it. And I would definitely wish him all the best."

While Nadal will replace Djokovic as number one in the rankings on November 4, the Serbian can still end the year in top spot, though it will likely require him to win all his matches in Paris and at the ATP Finals in London.

"I'm not thinking about it in that way. But I am in the race for number one with Rafa. He's in a much better position, but I hope I can do well in this tournament," Djokovic, who will face Dusan Lajovic or Corentin Moutet in his first match in Paris.

"I've historically played really well indoors in Paris and also London, but it doesn't depend on me.

"So I cannot really focus too much on what he is doing or other players. I'll try to kind of get the most out of my performances and see where it takes me.

"In order to have a chance for year-end number one, I have to win all of my matches until the end of the season. But also it depends on [Nadal], how he does."

Roger Federer has withdrawn from this week's Paris Masters, the ATP 1000 event has confirmed.

Federer claimed an emphatic 6-2 6-2 win over Alex De Minaur in the final of the Swiss Indoors Basel on Sunday – a 10th triumph overall at his home event.

The 38-year-old has now won four ATP titles this season, as many as Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Daniil Medvedev.

However, Federer has passed up the chance to pull alongside Sunday's Vienna Open victor Dominic Thiem on five wins for the calendar year, suggesting in a statement his exertions in Basel weighed heavily upon his decision.

"I am extremely disappointed to have to withdraw from the Rolex Paris Masters," he said.

"I have to spare myself because I want to play as long as possible on the ATP circuit.

"I'm sorry for my French fans that I will see next year at Roland-Garros."

Federer claimed his only win in Paris back in 2011, defeating Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in straight sets in the final.

He was a semi-finalist at the 2019 French Open, losing to Nadal at the end of a three-year absence from Roland-Garros.

Dominic Thiem rallied from a set down to beat Diego Schwartzman and claim a maiden Vienna Open title in his homeland on Sunday.

Schwartzman threatened to rip up the script at the Wiener Stadthalle, but top-seeded Austrian Thiem stormed back to win 3-6 6-4 6-3.

Thiem, who had failed to reach the final in his previous nine appearances in the tournament, recovered from a tentative start to stamp his authority on an entertaining match and claim an ATP Tour-leading fifth title of the season.

The world number five struggled with his serve in the first set and Schwartzman capitalised, but the favourite turned the tide to win a 16th title of his career with the backing of a partisan crowd.

Thiem failed to hold in the opening game of the match, but Argentinian Schwartzman was then broken to love in his first service game.

Schwartzman gained the initiative again by breaking for a 3-2 lead and took the set in emphatic fashion, with a break to love of his own.

Thiem took that in his stride and applied pressure early in the second set without immediate reward as the two continued to serve up high-quality rallies, trading punches from the baseline and mixing it up with deft drop shots.

The two-time French Open runner-up pumped his fist after fifth seed Schwartzman netted a forehand to go a break down at 5-4, and Thiem grasped the opportunity to serve out the set.

Thiem had the momentum and charged into a 2-0 lead in the decider, another errant Schwartzman forehand giving him the break in the opening game.

Schwartzman continued to put up a fight but could not force a break of his own and Thiem dropped to the deck in celebration after running in to put away a forehand winner and seal the title.

Roger Federer delighted an adoring home crowd by beating Alex de Minaur 6-2 6-2 to claim a 10th Swiss Indoors Basel title.

The Australian youngster proved no match for Federer, 38, who made his home event the joint-most prolific of his career alongside the Halle Open.

De Minaur was looking for his fourth Tour title of the season but faced an unenviable task when Federer smashed an overhead to break for 3-1 in the opener.

A loose service game from the 20-year-old allowed Federer to wrap up the first in 35 minutes and the writing was clearly on the wall when De Minaur slumped to 0-40 in the second game of set two.

He saved two break points but had no answer to a Federer forehand pass, with the end coming when De Minaur served unsuccessfully to stay in the match at 2-5 down.

Federer joins Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Daniil Medvedev on four Tour titles this season, on the day Dominic Thiem collected his fifth in Vienna.

Roger Federer produced another sterling display to defeat Stefanos Tsitsipas and move one win away from his 10th Swiss Indoors Basel title at a raucous St Jakobshalle.

Twenty-time grand slam champion Federer has been in brilliant, bruising form all week in his hometown, even if he reached the last four thanks to compatriot Stan Wawrinka's withdrawal due to a back injury.

There was no let up against his toughest opponent yet as Tsitsipas failed to withstand the Swiss storm, going down 6-4 6-4 to the stylish top seed and nine-time winner.

Tsitsipas, taken to three sets by Filip Krajinovic in the quarters while Federer rested, was immediately under intense pressure as a partisan crowd backed their man to go on the offensive.

The Greek escaped from the first five break points he faced but there was no halting Federer, who forced his opponent into a corner from where he could only find the net on the sixth opportunity.

Tsitsipas did well to prevent further damage but could not get back on serve, before Federer blasted into the lead in the first game of the second.

The 21-year-old forged his first break point in the final game of the match as the veteran favourite recovered from the brief hiccup to serve his way to a straightforward but impressive triumph.

Alex De Minaur awaits Federer in the final after battling past Reilly Opelka in three tie-breaks, winning 7-6 (7-2) 6-7 (4-7) 7-6 (7-3).

"In the second set, I did everything right - he just came up with two very big points," the Australian said. "I knew I just had to say, 'Too good,' and get ready for the third set."

De Minaur added of the Sunday decider: "I can't wait. It's my first time here and it's been a hell of an experience. I'm really looking forward to coming out tomorrow and having some fun."

Having never won an ATP Tour title prior to this season, De Minaur has triumphed in his three final appearances in 2019.

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