On this day in sport: LeBron rises with the Heat, the Panenka penalty is born

By Sports Desk June 20, 2020

June 20 is a day LeBron James will remember fondly, World Cup finals were settled and arguably the most famous penalty technique was first introduced. 

James was once again the king of Miami after leading the Heat to NBA glory in a thrilling series against the San Antonio Spurs. 

New Zealand made history at the first Rugby World Cup, while this day also saw Australia completely dominant in cricket's showpiece event.

Look back at some fond moments from years gone by on this day. 


1976 - The Panenka is born as Czechoslovakia celebrate

Defending European champions and reigning World Cup holders West Germany were overwhelming favourites for the final of Euro 1976. 

While Jan Svehlik and Karol Dobias put Czechoslovakia into a two-goal lead after 25 minutes, Dieter Muller and Bernd Holzenbein both scored to force extra-time in a 2-2 draw. 

When the additional minutes could not split the teams, a penalty shoot-out was required. Uli Hoeness' miss presented Antonin Panenka with a golden opportunity to seal glory.

His long run-up and delicate chip deceived goalkeeper Sepp Maier, leading to the birth of the famous Panenka penalty and earning a 5-3 victory shoot-out victory.


1987 - New Zealand win first final 

A near 50,000-strong crowd roared New Zealand on to victory on home soil at Eden Park in the first ever Rugby World Cup final. 

The fearsome All Blacks were too good for Scotland and Wales in the previous knockout rounds, but France had stunned Australia to provide hope of an upset. 

Instead, it was one-way traffic. Michael Jones, captain David Kirk and John Kirwan scored tries in a convincing 29-9 win over Les Bleus.  

Surprisingly, New Zealand would not be crowned champions again until 2011. 


1999 – Australia Lord it over Pakistan

The 1999 Cricket World Cup final was about as one-sided as it gets as Australia thrashed Pakistan by eight wickets. 

An enigmatic Pakistan side were skittled for a meagre 132 in 39 overs after surprisingly opting to bat first at Lord's, leg-spinner Shane Warne returning figures of 4-33. 

Australia – led by Steve Waugh - rattled off the chase with a whopping 29.5 overs to spare, Adam Gilchrist celebrating a half-century in the process. 

It marked the first of three consecutive World Cup triumphs for the Australians, as they reigned again under the captaincy of Ricky Ponting in both 2003 and 2007. 


2013 – LeBron's Heat reign again after Spurs epic

For the second straight year, LeBron James was named NBA Finals MVP as the Miami Heat retained their title by defeating the Spurs. 

It was the third straight year a star-studded Heat roster including Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh had made it through to the Finals. 

A see-saw series had seen the Spurs lead on three occasions but a dramatic 103-100 overtime win in Game 6, considered by many to be one of the great playoff contests in NBA history, set up a decider. 

James duly put up a game-high 37 points and provided 12 rebounds and four assists in a 95-88 triumph. 

The Spurs would gain revenge a year later, which proved to be James' last season in Miami as he returned to the Cleveland Cavaliers, the team who had drafted him first overall in 2003. 

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    Brazilian defender David Luiz was involved in a sickening collision of heads with Raul Jimenez in the fifth minute of Arsenal's 2-1 defeat on Sunday.

    Jimenez, 29, required oxygen prior to being carried off the pitch on a stretcher after medical professionals tended to him for 10 minutes.

    Further highlighting the force of the clash, it was confirmed by Wolves on Monday that the Mexico international suffered a fractured skull, but the club stressed the player is "comfortable" after undergoing surgery.

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    In the wake of the incident, Deeney attracted widespread criticism when suggesting players should be trusted to know whether they are capable of playing on or not.

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    Headway picked up on Arteta's assertion David Luiz did not lose consciousness, adding that is only ever prominent in 10 per cent of concussion cases.

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    Headway deputy chief executive officer Luke Griggs said: "Only last week we strongly criticised the International Football Association Board (IFAB) for its continued procrastination in introducing concussion substitutes into the sport.

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    Wolves provided an update on Monday, confirming the nature of the injury and adding that the Mexican was "comfortable" after an operation.

    "Raul is comfortable following an operation last night, which he underwent in a London hospital," read a club statement.

    "He has since seen his partner Daniela and is now resting. He will remain under observation for a few days while he begins his recovery.

    "The club would like to thank the medical staff at Arsenal, the NHS paramedics, hospital staff and surgeons who, through their skill and early response, were of such help.

    "The club ask that Raul and his family are now afforded a period of space and privacy, before any further updates are provided in due course."

    Managers Nuno Espirito Santo and Mikel Arteta wished Jimenez well following the match, with much of the post-game talk centred on the 29-year-old's health.

    The visitors managed to retain their focus to win the contest 2-1, with all three goals coming in the first half.

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    Jimenez collided heavily with Arsenal centre-back David Luiz when defending a fifth-minute corner at Emirates Stadium and left the field on a stretcher after receiving oxygen and lengthy medical attention.

    Wolves provided an update on Monday, confirming the nature of the injury and adding that the Mexican was "comfortable" after an operation.

    "Raul is comfortable following an operation last night, which he underwent in a London hospital," read a club statement.

    "He has since seen his partner Daniela and is now resting. He will remain under observation for a few days while he begins his recovery.

    "The club would like to thank the medical staff at Arsenal, the NHS paramedics, hospital staff and surgeons who, through their skill and early response, were of such help.

    "The club ask that Raul and his family are now afforded a period of space and privacy, before any further updates are provided in due course."

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