Former 100m world record holder Donovan Bailey has joined the throng of track and field greats who have come out against ESPN Max Kellerman who said track and field athletes are those who have failed at American football and basketball.

Jamaican track legend Usain Bolt and his United States counterpart Carl Lewis, rarely agree on anything, but both have stood firmly beside each other in chiding ESPN reporter Max Kellerman, over disparaging comments about the sport. 

On August 16, 2009, Usain Bolt clocked 9.58 seconds in the final of the 100 metres at the IAAF World Championships in Berlin.

A decade on, with the eight-time Olympic champion now retired, that world-record time still stands.

At just 22, the Jamaican obliterated a mark he had set exactly one year earlier at the Olympics in Beijing, shaving more than a tenth of a second of the time.

Doctor Peter Weyand, a biomechanics expert at Southern Methodist University, told Omnisport what made Bolt so unique.

A slow starter?

One of the biggest misconceptions of Bolt was that, due to his 6ft 5in frame, he was a slow starter. Not true, says Weyand. Particularly on that night in Germany when only Dwain Chambers was ahead of him after the first few strides.

"The most unusual thing was how well he was able to start for somebody as big as he is," Weyand explained.

"Normally the people that accelerate and get out of the blocks very quickly tend to be the shorter sprinters. The physics and biology of acceleration favours smaller people. In 2009, I think he started as well as anybody in that race. The start was a differentiator."

Long legs = more force

Though his height may have given him a slight disadvantage out of the blocks, Bolt's frame came in handy once the race opened up, allowing him to generate more power in the short steps sprinters take.

"What limits how fast a sprinter can go is how much force they can get down in the really short periods of time they have to do it," Weyand said.

"If you're going faster, the only way to do what you need to do to pop your body back up with a shorter contact time is to put down more force. What all elite sprinters do is put down more force in relation to their body mass than people who aren't as fast.

"If you're Bolt and you're 6ft 5in, you have a longer leg and you have more forgiveness. He probably has six, seven, eight milliseconds more on the ground.

"You have to put down a peak force of about five times body weight and that needs to happen in three hundredths of a second after your foot comes down.

"He was so athletic and so tall. His long legs gave him more time on the ground."

Fewer strides, greater success

Believe it or not, sprinters cannot maintain their top speed for the entire 100m. Bolt, who also holds the 200m world record, had another advantage in that he needed fewer strides to cover the distances.

"He had 41 steps usually [over 100m] and the other guys are 44, 45, some of the shorter ones are up in the high 40s," Weyand added.

"Particularly over 200 metres, the step numbers are directly related to fatiguing. If you go through fewer steps and fewer intense muscular contractions to put force into the ground, you have a fatigue-sparing effect."

Unique, but not perfect

Given he was able to accelerate out of the blocks quickly – relatively for his height – and was able to use his frame to generate more force across fewer strides, Bolt might have looked like the perfect sprinter.

But Weyand argued: "You can make a case that Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is the best female sprinter ever and she's 5ft tall.

"There are trade-offs in terms of being forceful when you accelerate versus having more contact time at your top-end speed."

Will Bolt's WR ever be broken?

No current athlete looks close to eclipsing Bolt's time in the near future, but that does not mean his record time will stand forever.

In 2008, marathon runner and biology professor Mark Denny conducted research and predicted the fastest possible time a male sprinter could run is 9.48secs.

"Nothing's ever perfect, Bolt's obviously a unique athlete but no race is perfect and no set of circumstances are perfect," Weyand said.

"Certainly faster than 9.58 [is possible] but that's a question that's hard to answer without being pretty speculative."

The only thing that is certain is for now – as has been the case for the previous 10 years too – the title of 'the fastest man on earth' belongs to Bolt.

Rising United States sprinting talent Noah Lyles has admitted legendary Jamaica sprinter Usain Bolt was right to question his championship mettle but hopes to silence all doubters at the upcoming IAAF World Championships.

The 22-year-old Lyles has recently featured prominently among the handful of names labeled as potentially next in line to inherit the throne vacated by the big Jamaican.

 To add fuel to the fire, Lyles recently clocked an impressive 19.50, the fourth-fastest time in the event’s history, in Lausanne, Switzerland last month.  While admitting that Lyles was unquestionably a huge talent, Bolt insisted he was waiting to see such performances replicated on the big stage.

“Yeah, I’ve seen him run, I’ve seen him compete,” Bolt told the New York Times.

“Last season he was doing a lot of good things, this season he has started off good. But as I said, it all comes down to the championship. Is he confident to come into a race after running three races and show up? For me, he has shown that he has talent, but when the championship comes, we will see what happens,” he added.

Lyles is yet to compete at a major championship and is also a threat over 100m but dropped the event from his schedule at the United States national championship to ensure full focus on the 200m.

“Sounds about right to me, sounds like my thoughts exactly,” Lyles said when shown the Bolt’s comments.

“It’s why I decided to run one event this year.”

Sometimes after a particularly grueling workout, sprinter Justin Gatlin will turn to his younger training partners and inquire: "Are you sore, too?" 

Reigning 100m World Champions Omar McLeod believes former world’s fastest man Usain Bolt was well within his rights to defend longtime coach Glen Mills.

The decorated Olympian and sprint icon set off a social media storm in recent weeks when he was highly critical of the work attitude of some of the current crop of sprinters, following criticism of veteran coach Mills.

  In recent weeks, multiple athletes affiliated to the Racers Track Club had written social media pieces critical of the coach and the operation of the now-famous club.  In a terse response, Bolt suggested that the athletes had only themselves to blame for any lack of success, accusing them of not working hard enough.  While admitting that he did not know enough about the issue, McLeod claims to understand the sprinter’s defense of the coach.   

“I don’t know about what happened in-depth, I’ve seen the interview.  I’m really happy he made the decision to speak up for his coach.  It can be a thing when athletes don’t get what they want they try to point fingers and blame other people,” McLeod told Nuffin’ Long Athletics.

 “Nobody knows the extent of what happened, I don’t so I don’t want to speak of it but I just think it was good of him to come out and speak because he and his coach have had a really good career and I guess he is a father figure to Usain Bolt.”

The wait for Tottenham is over – they have finally signed a player!

After what felt like an eternity since their last new arrival, Mauricio Pochettino's side have signed teenage winger Jack Clarke from Leeds United - and there could be more to follow in this transfer window.

The previous time Tottenham added a new face to the squad was on January 31, 2018, when Lucas Moura arrived from Paris Saint-Germain.

Plenty has happened in the period since the Brazilian landed in north London. We take a look at how the world has changed in the past 18 months.

MADRID'S MANAGERIAL MERRY-GO-ROUND

Five days after winning a third successive Champions League, Zinedine Zidane announced his departure from Real Madrid. But his replacement - Julen Lopetegui - did not last long, and was sacked in November.

Santiago Solari took over, but he too found himself out of the role within a matter of months, and on March 11, Zidane returned for his second spell in charge of Los Blancos.

Cristiano Ronaldo, meanwhile, left Madrid for good, going on to star as Juventus cruised to another Serie A title - in total, the Portuguese star has scored 55 goals for club and country since January 31, 2018, while Lionel Messi has netted an astonishing 72.

CITY'S DOMESTIC DOMINANCE AND FOOTBALL (ALMOST) COMES HOME

By the end of January 2018, Pep Guardiola had yet to win anything at Manchester City. Since then, however, the Spaniard has lifted the Premier League twice, the EFL Cup in successive seasons and also the FA Cup, completing a domestic treble at Wembley in May.

Meanwhile, Liverpool, who ran City close in the Premier League last term, have made it to two Champions League finals, losing in 2018 to Real Madrid before beating Spurs 2-0 this year in an all-English showdown in Madrid.

While English sides have enjoyed success in Europe, England have also undergone a rejuvenation under Gareth Southgate, reaching the semi-finals of a World Cup before also enjoying further success in the Nations League.

TRANSFER RECORDS TUMBLE

While Liverpool had already brought in Virgil van Dijk for a record fee for a defender by the time Lucas signed for Tottenham, the Reds then smashed the previous amount paid for a goalkeeper when they drafted in Alisson from Roma for a reported £56million.

The record did not last long, with Chelsea paying £72m for Kepa Arrizabalaga a few weeks later.

Overall, the rest of the Premier League's so called 'big six' have spent over £600m on new players since Spurs' previous signing.

PREMIER LEAGUE LEGENDS HEAD INTO MANAGEMENT

Steven Gerrard and Frank Lampard both took their first senior management roles in 2018, taking charge of Rangers and Derby County respectively.

Lampard's efforts with the Rams look set to have landed him the Chelsea job after Maurizio Sarri's one-season stay, with the Blues in talks to bring their former player and record scorer back to Stamford Bridge.

Paul Scholes also took charge at Oldham Athletic, but quit after just 31 days. Thierry Henry tried to arrest an alarming Monaco slump, yet his reign was short and not so sweet, the Frenchman spending 104 days in charge of the Ligue 1 club.

BOLT'S FORAY INTO FOOTBALL, ZION GRADUATES AND AUSTRALIAN DUO BANNED

Usain Bolt finally started his football career - at the age of 32 - when he joined A-League side Central Coast Mariners in August, scoring two goals on his first start for the club in October, before retiring from sport in January.

In the NBA, Zion Williamson became basketball's next star, graduating from high school and, following a dominant freshman-year stint with the Duke Blue Devils, he was selected by the New Orleans Pelicans first overall in the 2019 NBA Draft.

Steve Smith and David Warner both received 12-month bans for their participation in the ball-tampering scandal that rocked Australian cricket. The duo have since returned to action, taking part in the Cricket World Cup on English soil.

Rafael Nadal has won two French Open titles while Tiger Woods returned to the pinnacle of golf with his victory at the Masters.

IN THE NEWS

The political landscape in Britain remains uncertain, with Theresa May, amid ongoing furore over failed Brexit negotiations, announcing her resignation as Prime Minister.

Donald Trump has sent in excess of 3,000 tweets, while North and South Korea came together in an historical summit in September.

And finally, Elon Musk's SpaceX programme managed to launch a Tesla Roadster into space, complete with a mannequin in a spacesuit. Well, why not?

The Jamaica International Invitational, the local meet where retired sprint king Usain Bolt once thrilled fans with outstanding performances, will not be held this year.

The meet, which has been held every year since 2004, often brought some of track and field’s biggest names to Jamaica soil.  In addition to Bolt, who set the meet’s respectable 100m record of 9.76 seconds in 2008 and 19.56 in the 200m two years later, Americans Jasmin Stowers, Carmelita Jeter and Kerron Clement have set some eye-popping marks.  In 2011 Jeter stopped the clock at 10.86 in the women’s 100m, Clement thrilled fans with his brisk 47.79 400m hurdles run in 2008 and Stowers set the mark of 12.39 in the women’s 100m hurdles in 2015.

Despite those glowing performances, the meet which was upgraded to an IAAF World Challenge event had struggled to secure funding in recent years.  According to organizers, the issue has led to the cancellation of the 2019 edition of the event, which was originally scheduled to take place at the National Stadium on May 4.  A message posted on jainvite.com the official page of the event confirmed its cancellation.  At this stage, the future of the Invitational remains unclear.

 

Usain Bolt, the eight-time Olympic gold medallist, it was announced on Tuesday, as the global spokesperson for the Bolt Mobility brand of personal electric scooters.

United States track and field legend Carl Lewis has insisted that it would be foolish not to question the records set by recently retired Jamaican sprint king Usain Bolt but claims it was never anything personal.

The 57-year-old Lewis, a nine-time Olympic gold medallist, sparked a firestorm in 2008 when he suggested that the spectacular feats accomplished by Bolt might have been with the aim of performance-enhancing drugs.  Lewis pointed to major reductions in the sprinter’s times over 100m an event he first competed in, in 2007.  In his youth, Bolt became the first junior sprinter to run the 200m in under twenty seconds.

Lewis’ criticism sparked the ire of fans worldwide, many turning to accused him of envy.  The American’s cynical point of view did not escape Bolt himself who insisted he had lost all respect for the former sprinter. 

In a recent interview on ‘Undeniable with Dan Patrick’, however, Lewis stood by the controversial comments but insists the issue was never personal and spoke to the integrity of the sport.

“My thing was I didn’t accuse anyone of anything but what I said is that you have to question if someone drops that fast like that.  If you don’t then you are crazy or a fool or something, whatever I said,” Lewis said in the interview to be aired on A&T Audience Network.

“My issue with drugs has always been the brand.  Being a sport that people think is on drugs is bad for the brand.  I didn’t trust it (Bolt’s times) so I put it out there.  People asked me, ‘What are you saying?’, I already said what I said and there is nothing to change. I stand by it,” he added.

The 32-year-old Bolt still holds the world records for both the 100m and 200m sprints, blistering marks of 9.58 and 19.19 set in 2009 that have seemed untouchable for the past several years.

“Of course, I questioned that.  It doesn’t mean I’m saying he is on it (drugs) but we should question it…they should question anyone that does that kind of drop.  I didn’t say anywhere that he was on it.  I said we should question it because if you don’t it’s ridiculous.”

A 7-year-old social media sensation is already drawing comparisons to Jamaican sprint king Usain Bolt after breaking records and leaving rivals stifling in his dust.

Rudolph Ingram, also known as Blaze, has been dubbed as the fastest kid in the world after clocking a speedy 13.48 seconds over 100m.  The mark smashed the previous best of 13.69 set in 2011. 

In two videos posted to his Instagram account, which already has over 300,000 followers, Blaze is seen destroying hapless opposition in no uncertain fashion.  According to his father, Rudolph Ingram Sr, who is an American football coach, Blaze became motivated after watching the Olympics and began training soon after the event.

“Proud To Say My Son Maybe The Fastest 7 Year Old In The World. To The Top Love All Those Hours Of Training Payed Off,” Ingram Sr. tweeted via Instagram.

Despite possessing obvious sprinting talent, however, Ingram is more interested in American football.

Juventus captain Giorgio Chiellini has likened team-mate Cristiano Ronaldo to Roger Federer and Usain Bolt, and is relishing learning from the five-time Ballon d'Or winner.

Ronaldo joined Juve in pre-season for a reported €110million after a successful nine-year spell with Real Madrid and he has been a hit in Italy too, scoring 18 Serie A goals in 23 appearances.

The move came as something of a shock and instantly saw Juve spoken about as arguably the favourites for the 2018-19 Champions League, with Ronaldo having played a vital role in Madrid's domination of the competition in the past three seasons.

Ronaldo's arrival also helped fill the void – in terms of experience and leadership – of Gianluigi Buffon, who joined Paris Saint-Germain for his swansong, allowing Chiellini to take up the role of captain on a permanent basis.

The Italian is enjoying learning from Ronaldo, who he feels is comparable to 20-time tennis grand slam winner Federer and Bolt, the eight-time Olympic champion generally regarded as the greatest sprinter of all time.

"Replacing Buffon is not easy at all," Chiellini told La Stampa. "As captain, you do not need to do the jobs of the others.  

"But, you have to help maintain a balance [in the squad], and in a multi-cultural dressing room which includes many different backgrounds, habits and religions, it's not always easy, but sharing that [environment] is beautiful.

"You become a leader. I am a curious person, a good observer and I like learning. For example, having Ronaldo close to me is interesting.

"He is like Bolt and Federer. Understanding the habits of those who have that extra gear helps. It is not to imitate him, but rather it helps to broaden my horizons [as captain]."

Eight-time Olympic gold medallist Usain Bolt made a statement at Mercedes-Benz Stadium ahead of Super Bowl LIII. 

A Japanese centenarian affectionately known as the ‘Golden Bolt’ for his record-breaking exploits on the track, has died at the age of 108.

Hidekichi Miyazaki caught the attention of the world, including Jamaican sprint king Usain Bolt, when he set the world record in the over-105 age group four years ago.  The relatively speedy Miyazaki clocked 42.22 seconds over 100m the day after his 105th birthday. 

He immediately paid tribute to Bolt, the world’s fastest man with his own version of the trademark ‘lightning Bolt’ pose, earning him the moniker of the Golden Bolt.

No previous world record existed when Miyazaki ran the time in his home city of Kyoto in 2015.  He, however, had not been entirely pleased with the performance.

"I am not happy with the time,” Miyazaki said at the time

"I started shedding tears during the race because I was going so slowly,” he added.

"Perhaps I'm getting old!"

His achievements were, however, recognized by the world’s fastest man who gave the golden-ager a shout out, despite owning a world record some 32.64 seconds faster.

"Shout out to 105-year-old Hidekichi Miyazaki of Japan who holds the record for the oldest sprinter to compete over 100m,” Bolt said via Twitter.

 

    

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