New Zealand will be expected to continue their dominance of Argentina and the Rugby Championship when the tournament gets under way on Saturday.

The All Blacks have won the trophy in each of the last three years and are favourites to retain it with the Rugby World Cup fast approaching.

Argentina have never beaten the world champions in 32 attempts and will have to produce something special to make history in Buenos Aires this weekend.

South Africa host Australia at Emirates Airline Park, and the Springboks have won nine of their previous 10 encounters with the Wallabies at the Johannesburg venue.

Take a look at the Opta numbers ahead of Saturday's opening round of matches.

 

South Africa v Australia

- South Africa have lost only one of their last five Tests against Australia, although two of those meetings ended as draws.

- The Springboks have won 13 of their last 16 games played at Emirates Airline Park, including their last three on the bounce, scoring an average of 36 points per match.

- Australia will be looking to secure back-to-back Rugby Championship wins for the first time since 2016 after ending their 2018 campaign with a 45-34 success over Argentina.

- The Wallabies' win rate of 24 per cent when playing in South Africa is their lowest in any nation. Indeed, it is the lowest win rate of any of the six nations to have played more than 20 Tests there.

- Australia back Dane Haylett-Petty gained 397 metres in the 2018 Rugby Championship, the most of any player and 130 more than South Africa's best, Siya Kolisi (267).

 

Argentina v New Zealand

- Argentina’s only positive result against New Zealand came in a 21-21 draw in November 1985. Since that match in Buenos Aires they have lost all 10 home games against the All Blacks.

- New Zealand are on the cusp of their 450th win – 43 more than any other team – and require just 26 points this weekend to become the first nation to score 16,000 international points.

- The All Blacks have won 15 of their last 17 games, including a 66-3 victory against Italy in Rome in their most recent fixture.

- Argentina full-back Nicolas Sanchez scored the most points (67) of any player in the competition last year. He scored four tries, 16 of 17 conversions, four of seven penalty attempts and a drop goal.

- Argentina have lost their last four games played at Velez Sarsfield, including defeats to New Zealand in their last two games at the venue.

Mario Ledesma hopes Argentina can use the nation's excitement to their advantage in their Rugby Championship opener against New Zealand.

Argentina will host the All Blacks in Buenos Aires on Saturday, in the first of three games of a tournament shortened due to the upcoming Rugby World Cup.

The clash comes on the back of the Jaguares' stunning run to the Super Rugby final, where they fell to the Crusaders.

Argentina's starting line-up for their Rugby Championship opener includes 13 Jaguares and Ledesma hopes his team can deliver.

"We have to play with the enthusiasm of the people," he told a news conference.

"That people are excited is great and we have to take the positive side, but we have to be on and [focus on] how we improve from here to Saturday."

The All Blacks are unbeaten in 32 previous meetings with Argentina, winning 31 and drawing one.

Argentina: Emiliano Boffelli, Matias Moroni, Matias Orlando, Jeronimo de la Fuente, Ramiro Moyano, Nicolas Sanchez, Tomas Cubelli; Nahuel Tetaz Chaparro, Agustin Creevy, Juan Figallo, Guido Petti, Tomas Lavanini, Pablo Matera, Marcos Kremer, Javier Ortega Desio.
Replacements: Julian Montoya, Mayco Vivas, Santiago Medrano, Matias Alemanno, Tomas Lezana, Felipe Ezcurra, Joaquin Diaz Bonilla, Joaquin Tuculet.

Just two months before the Rugby World Cup starts in Japan, this year's Rugby Championship will give opportunities for players desperate to board the plane to Japan.

While Beauden Barrett, Michael Hooper, Pieter-Steph du Toit and Nicolas Sanchez are nailed on to feature on the biggest stage for their respective nations, fitness permitting of course, there are some who are playing for a place in the squad.

New Zealand prepare to start the defence of their title against Argentina in Buenos Aires on Saturday, while South Africa and Australia do battle at Ellis Park on the same day.

Here we have picked out those who will be determined to grasp their opportunities in a shortened tournament in 2019.

 

SEVU REECE, NEW ZEALAND

Reece was one of four uncapped players named in the All Blacks squad for the opening two rounds.

The 22-year-old wing was the leading try scorer in Super Rugby, lighting up the competition as the Crusaders retained their title.

Fiji-born flyer Reece has the pace, power and skill to deliver on the international stage and an impressive Rugby Championship can book him a ticket to the World Cup.

Reece was supposed to join Connacht and looked set to play for Fiji, but after being granted a discharge without conviction over a domestic assault last year, he has experienced a rapid rise.

 

HARRY JOHNSON-HOLMES, AUSTRALIA

Johnson-Holmes was flown over to Johannesburg to link up with an injury-hit Australia squad for their encounter with the Springboks.

The 22-year-old Waratahs prop is poised to come off the bench for what is sure to be a fierce battle this weekend.

With Tom Robertson (ankle) and Scott Sio (adductor) missing out, Johnson-Holmes has been summoned from the fringes.

James Slipper got the nod to start in what will be his first international appearance since 2016 and he will be eager to make up for lost time, but Johnson-Holmes is vying for a World Cup call.

 

HERSCHEL JANTJIES, SOUTH AFRICA

Herschel Jantjies and Rynhardt Elstadt will make their South Africa bows against Michael Cheika's men.

Elton Jantjies and namesake Herschel will form a half-back pairing for the first time on the Test stage.

Springbok assistant coach Mzwandile Stick says scrum-half Herschel has the potential for greatness and he will get the opportunity to live up to the hype.

While Faf de Klerk and Cobus Reinach are ahead of the 23-year-old in the pecking order, but there is still time to show he merits a spot after an excellent Super Rugby season for the Stormers.

 

LUCAS MENSA, ARGENTINA 

Livewire Lucas Mensa is a potential bolter for the Pumas' World Cup party.

The centre was called up to Argentina's first Rugby Championship squad by Mario Ledesma, who will be aiming to build on an outstanding, historic Super Rugby campaign by the Jaguares.

Mensa is a bundle of energy and is capable of hitting the ground running at international level.

Yet to make his debut, the 23-year-old has impressed Ledesma while playing for Argentina XV in the Americas Rugby Championship.

Sevu Reece will make his New Zealand debut in the Rugby Championship clash against Argentina, while four further uncapped players have been named among the replacements by Steve Hansen.

Reece was a controversial selection in the All Blacks' squad after he received a discharge without conviction for domestic assault last year.

Irish province Connacht pulled out of a move for Reece in the wake of his court appearance, but the wing was then signed by the Crusaders as injury cover and went on to excel as Super Rugby's top try-scorer in 2019.

Reece is now set to start on the right wing in Buenos Aires on Saturday, with Jordie Barrett on the opposite flank.

Head coach Hansen was quoted by stuff.co.nz as saying: "As the season has gone on, he [Reece] has just got better and better as a player. And as a person. We got interested enough to say, 'Hey, we need to keep looking at this guy'.

"And then it got past that point and we said, 'Look, we are going to need to pick him'.

"Now we want to find out if he can take that next step. This game is the logical game to play him in."

Sam Cane had already been confirmed as New Zealand's stand-in skipper and Ardie Savea will start at number eight in the absence of Kieran Read, one of several Crusaders players rested for the Argentina fixture.

Atu Moli, Luke Jacobson, Josh Ioane and Braydon Ennor could join Reece in earning their first caps after being named on the bench.

New Zealand team to face Argentina: Ben Smith, Sevu Reece, Anton Lienert-Brown, Ngani Laumape, Jordie Barrett, Beauden Barrett, Aaron Smith; Ofa Tuungafasi, Dane Coles, Angus Ta'avao, Brodie Retallick, Patrick Tuipulotu, Vaea Fifita, Sam Cane (captain), Ardie Savea.

Replacements: Liam Coltman, Atu Moli, Nepo Laulala, Jackson Hemopo, Luke Jacobson, Brad Weber, Josh Ioane, Braydon Ennor.

Black Caps star Trent Boult said "sorry for letting everyone down" following New Zealand's heartbreaking loss to England in the Cricket World Cup final.

New Zealand were agonisingly denied by England in a dramatic decider at Lord's on Sunday – the World Cup hosts prevailing due to their superior boundary count after a Super Over.

Both New Zealand and England made 241 from 50 overs and 15 in the subsequent Super Over shoot-out as the latter prevailed by the smallest of margins for their maiden World Cup title.

After arriving back in New Zealand on Thursday, paceman Boult told reporters: "It's been a long flight home but it [the defeat] probably hasn't sunk in yet.

"I wish it would, so we can all get over it but it's one of those things that we probably won't get over for a long time."

Boult added: "We've just been on a plane 15 hours and there were a lot of Kiwis saying 'we felt for you'. I didn't really know what to say.

"Obviously, we're all hurting and we're sorry for letting everyone down. I just want to get home, walk my dog along the beach and try to forget about it but it's gonna be a hard one to swallow for the next couple of years."

A Super Over was required at Lord's after an extraordinary moment of luck helped England during the closing stages of their run chase.

Ben Stokes inadvertently deflected the ball to the boundary rope, meaning England were sensationally awarded six runs as he raced back to complete a second run with nine needed from three balls

"It's natural to nitpick, to wonder about all those little things and how it could have been a totally different game," Boult said.

"I've been living that last over in my mind a lot – somehow I got hit for six along the ground which has never happened before. To see the scores level [after the Super Over] and still lose, yeah, that was a pretty unique situation."

Boult was involved in a heartbreaking moment of his own after taking a catch off England all-rounder Stokes, only to step on the boundary rope and concede six runs.

"The priority in that situation is on the ball itself, so that was all I was worried about. It was silly of me not to know where the rope was. It was similar to the catch against the West Indies earlier in the tournament but they're quite quirky boundaries over there [at Lord's]. They're not circles, they're kind of octagons and squares and all sorts of things.

"You can imagine the feeling when my left shoe hit the cushion and it was too late to throw the ball to Marty [Guptill]. There were probably 27,000 intoxicated Poms in there screaming as the ball went up, so I couldn't hear anything Marty was saying."

New Zealand head coach Gary Stead expects the ICC to review the rules that led to the Black Caps losing the Cricket World Cup final to England courtesy of an inferior boundary count.

In an extraordinary final at Lord's on Sunday, England ultimately prevailed after both teams had made 241 runs from 50 overs and 15 in the subsequent Super Over shootout.

Many observers felt another one-over eliminator would have represented a fairer way to decide the winners, rather than the champions being determined by the number of boundaries hit during the contest.

"I'm sure there's going to be many things they [the ICC] will look at over the whole tournament," Stead was quoted as saying by stuff.co.nz. "I'm sure when they're writing the rules they never expect the World Cup final to happen like that so I'm sure it'll be reviewed, absolutely."

"The technicalities and stuff around the rules, they're different in all tournaments. We knew what it was, we were just one run short. It's a very, very hollow feeling that you can play 100 overs and score the same amount of runs and still lose the game. But that's the technicalities of sport sometimes."

The Super Over was only required after England benefited from an extraordinary slice of good fortune towards the end of their initial run-chase.

As he raced back to complete a second run with nine needed from three balls, Ben Stokes inadvertently deflected the ball to the boundary rope, ensuring England were awarded six runs.

Former umpire Simon Taufel claimed England should actually have been given five runs rather than six, as Stokes and Adil Rashid had not crossed at the point Martin Guptill threw the ball in.

"I didn't actually know that," said Stead. "At the end of the day the umpires are there to rule and they're human as well and like players sometimes errors are made.

"That's just the human aspect of sport and probably why we care so much as well."

Trevor Bayliss expects Eoin Morgan to want to lead England into next year's T20 World Cup amid discussion over whether he will remain as captain following their dramatic 50-over World Cup triumph at Lord's on Sunday.

England lifted the trophy for the first time as they claimed an incredible win over New Zealand, prevailing on number of boundaries after the scores finished tied following each side's 50 overs and then a Super Over.

The successful end to England's four-year journey to world supremacy on the ODI stage, the vision for which was laid out by Morgan after their humiliating 2015 campaign, has led to talk of the Irish-born batsman possibly stepping down as skipper.

However, Bayliss, for whom the victory marked his final white-ball game in charge, believes Morgan will want to stay on and try to guide England to another world title in Australia.

As England continued their celebrations at The Oval on Monday, Bayliss said: "There is a T20 World Cup coming up in 12 months which I am sure he will be more than up for. [But] that will be an individual decision for him.

"Morgs is the leader of not just the guys in the team but off the field as well. He is the one who has really driven this forward.

"I think the rest of the boys try and run through a brick wall for him and the effort that Ben Stokes put in yesterday was just an example of that."

Bayliss was not fully convinced he could bring England's dismal record at World Cups to an end when he was appointed four years ago, but the Australian will leave his post after the Ashes vindicated for a steadfast commitment to aggressive and positive cricket.

"I wasn't sure [when I started] but it was certainly a country with a long history of cricket and I knew that they desperately wanted to do better than they had been doing," Bayliss added. "[I was told] no stone would be left unturned in an effort to get that World Cup.

"It's justification for how we went about it for the last four years. At different times we have copped a bit of criticism but we had an end goal in mind and this is the result."

England director of cricket Ashley Giles is uninterested in claims they were erroneously given an extra run in their incredible World Cup final win over New Zealand.

The tournament hosts lifted the trophy for the first time courtesy of having struck more boundaries than the Black Caps after the scores were tied at the end of 50 overs and then a Super Over.

However, arguably the pivotal moment in a bewitching contest came with the fourth ball of England's final over as, after hitting a full toss to deep midwicket, Ben Stokes inadvertently deflected Martin Guptill's throw to the fence as he ran back for two.

England were awarded six runs to take them within three of victory, falling one short but eventually prevailing on boundaries after both teams scored 15 in the Super Over.

But MCC rule 19:8 states that additional runs to a boundary from an overthrow or wilful act of fielder can only be awarded if the two batsmen have crossed at the time of the throw.

Stokes and Adil Rashid had not crossed when Guptill released the ball, and five-time ICC umpire of the year Simon Taufel said England should have only been awarded five runs, describing the six as a "clear mistake" and an "error of judgment", though he conceded the difficulty of officiating such a freak turn of events in the heat of the moment.

That is of no concern to Giles, who when asked whether the extra run mattered to him replied: "Not really.

"You could argue the last ball that [Trent] Boult bowled was a full toss on leg stump and if Stokes' hadn't just been looking for two he probably would've banged it out of the ground anyway.

"We are world champions; we have got the trophy and we intend to keep it."

There was chaos at Lord's on Sunday as England won the Cricket World Cup, beating New Zealand in the final in scarcely believable fashion.

An incredible clash went all the way to a Super Over and a boundary count to decide the winner after the scores were tied, with Ben Stokes' heroic effort to get England back into the match absolutely vital.

Plenty has been said and written about Stokes, his bizarre accidental six and the Super Over, but a lot of the finer details of the match were lost amid the noise.

We take a look at five key factors in England's win that might have been missed.

 

MIXED REVIEWS FROM NEW ZEALAND OPENERS

It did not take long for this absorbing contest to spark intrigue as the New Zealand openers had contrasting fortunes with reviews. Henry Nicholls' decision to go upstairs was a good one as replays showed Chris Woakes' delivery, initially ruled lbw, was going over the top and the batsman went on to make 55. Martin Guptill's call when he was dismissed was less impressive.

Woakes beat him on the inside edge and Guptill unwisely asked to take another look, throwing away a review. There was then no option open to Ross Taylor, who would have escaped after being pinned by Mark Wood.

WILLIAMSON'S FAILURE MORE COSTLY THAN ROOT'S

Both Kane Williamson and Joe Root enjoyed outstanding World Cups and were fully deserving of their places in the official team of the tournament. But neither man truly fired at Lord's on Sunday, with Williamson gone for 30 from 53 balls and Root even more sluggish with seven off 30.

Tom Latham still performed admirably after the New Zealand captain went, reaching 47, yet they went 92 balls without a boundary at one stage and failed to truly kick on. Williamson ended the tournament with 50 fours but was badly missed in those middle overs - especially considering boundary count became the final tie-breaker.

SANTNER DUCKS FINAL BALL TO SET 242

This really was a match of fine margins, with both teams scoring the same number of runs in their regular innings and then again in the Super Over. Every tiny error could be perceived as costly and there was a bizarre moment as Mitchell Santner inexplicably limited New Zealand's scoring at 241-8.

Jofra Archer sent in a slower-ball bouncer to end the Black Caps innings and Santner, with nothing to lose, ducked out of the way. That decision eased England's chase by a tiny but decisive margin.

DE GRANDHOMME DESPERATELY UNFORTUNATE

He might not have been an obvious hero, but had New Zealand held on in the fast and furious finale, Colin de Grandhomme could have been considered the match-winner. England's target of 242 was relatively modest but they were strangled by De Grandhomme, who took 1-25, having dropped Jonny Bairstow in his first over.

His was the most economical 10-over spell in a World Cup final since 1992 when Derek Pringle claimed 3-22. Like Pringle, though, his efforts were ultimately in vain.

BLACK CAPS' SPORTSMANSHIP EVIDENT AGAIN

Three sixes off the final two overs of England's innings did the damage for New Zealand. But while much has been made of the ludicrous nature of the third, as Ben Stokes accidently nudged a throw to the boundary, Guptill deserves credit for his honesty following the maximum that kickstarted England's surge.

Stokes looked to have been denied at the fence by Trent Boult, but the left-armer stepped on the boundary before unloading for Guptill to take the catch. In a fine show of sportsmanship, for which New Zealand were lauded throughout the tournament, Guptill immediately signalled for six.

Ashley Giles hailed the roles of Eoin Morgan and Trevor Bayliss in England's Cricket World Cup win, adding he is in no rush to discuss the captain's future or to decide on the next head coach.

Skipper Morgan led hosts England to their first World Cup success after a dramatic final at Lord's on Sunday, with Bayliss watching on as he prepares to leave his role as coach following the upcoming Ashes series.

Morgan, now 32, is likely to be questioned on his plans going forward, yet Giles is giving nothing away.

And the director of cricket is also willing to be patient in appointing Bayliss' successor, keen not to distract from the Ashes against Australia, starting on August 1.

"We've not got to [discussions with Morgan] quite yet, but Eoin's been a brilliant leader of this team," Giles told Sky Sports.

"He was a crucial part of the turnaround in our white-ball form - as was Trevor Bayliss and Andrew Strauss. We'll wait to talk about that.

"For us, we move on very quickly - we have Ashes camp starting at the weekend. Hopefully we can get the boys home and get them some rest.

"Trevor was brought in specifically really for his knowledge of white-ball cricket, with that being his strength area. He's done a great job.

"Most of the time, he's horizontal, extremely laid back, and sets the right environment in the dressing room. I'm chuffed for him. That partnership with Eoin Morgan has been fundamental to us getting to this point.

"The same applies as before [with Bayliss' future]. We're going to wait until after the Ashes for any process.

"There's a lot of noise anyway - here and through the Ashes, too - so if we have to go to the winter with someone who's just a stand-in for the time being, we'll do that. We'll run a full process after the Ashes is completed."

England should have been awarded five runs, not six, when Ben Stokes inadvertently deflected a throw to the boundary in Sunday's epic Cricket World Cup final.

An apologetic Stokes earned six runs when he accidently nudged the ball for four as he lunged to complete a second run in the final over of England's innings, helping the hosts to tie the match with New Zealand and reach a Super Over.

England subsequently won due to their superior boundary count, but Simon Taufel says the Lord's umpires made "a clear mistake".

The MCC laws state additional runs to the boundary can only be awarded if the two batsmen have crossed at the time of the throw.

Stokes and team-mate Adil Rashid had completed one run but had not crossed a second time when Martin Guptill launched the ball back towards the wicket, meaning five runs should have been given.

Rashid would also have been on strike rather than star man Stokes.

Five-time ICC Umpire of the Year Taufel, part of the MCC laws sub-committee, acknowledged the error but had sympathy for on-field officials Kumar Dharmasena and Marais Erasmus.

"[England] should have been awarded five runs, not six," Taufel told FOX Sports. "It's a clear mistake - it's an error of judgment.

"In the heat of what was going on, they thought there was a good chance the batsmen had crossed at the instant of the throw. Obviously TV replays showed otherwise.

"The difficulty you have here is you've got to watch batsmen completing runs, then change focus and watch for the ball being picked up, and watch for the release [of the throw].

"You also have to watch where the batsmen are at that exact moment.

"[But] it's unfair on England, New Zealand and the umpires involved to say it decided the outcome."

The dust is still settling on a truly remarkable Cricket World Cup final at Lord's, where England edged New Zealand in enthralling fashion.

The hosts could only muster the same amount of runs as the Black Caps and actually produced fewer wickets, yet Eoin Morgan's men still scraped home on the boundary countback after a dramatic Super Over.

Statistics counted in England's favour on Sunday and they predictably led the way in a number of metrics as we look back on the tournament as a whole.

Using Opta data, we highlight the most outstanding figures from an incredible few weeks.

 

6 - Victory at Lord's on Sunday saw England claim their first World Cup title, becoming the sixth different team to win the competition.

12 - Meanwhile, New Zealand, beaten in such agonising fashion, are the team to have appeared at the most tournaments without getting their hands on the trophy.

22 - Ben Stokes saw a couple of bizarre sixes fall his way in the final, but team-mate and captain Morgan hit the most maximums at the 2019 finals.

4 - Four players this year passed the 1000-run mark for their World Cup careers. Virat Kohli (1,030), Shakib al Hasan (1,146) and the retiring Chris Gayle (1,186) were joined by Ross Taylor (1,002) on Sunday.

4.15 - Of the 48 players to bowl at least 40 overs, Colin de Grandhomme boasted the best economy rate. It was an outstanding 2.50 in the final.

648 - Rohit Sharma recorded the most runs at the 2019 tournament - the third most at a single World Cup - while no player in history can match his five centuries at a single edition.

27 - Mitchell Starc was also a record-breaker, with his wicket tally never bettered at a World Cup. After tying Trent Boult in 2015, he was on top of the pile again.

371 - Jofra Archer's inability to slow New Zealand in the Super Over almost cost England, but he contributed more dot balls than another bowler at the tournament. Boult, his Super Over rival, was second (351).

0 - His work with the bat in the final - intentional and otherwise - made Stokes the hero, yet he was also the only man to bowl at least 30 overs at the World Cup and not be hit for a six.

13 - England had a whole host of heroes throughout the tournament and Test captain Joe Root made more catches as a non-wicketkeeper than any player in the history of the World Cup.

21 - Including the men in the gloves, Tom Latham got 21 fielding dismissals - matching Adam Gilchrist's 2003 record.

Jofra Archer has revealed the encouragement he was offered by Ben Stokes before Sunday's dramatic Cricket World Cup final Super Over.

Stokes' heroic effort with the bat - making an unbeaten 84 - saw England dramatically take New Zealand to an additional six balls, where the Durham all-rounder starred again to set the Black Caps a target of 16 to win.

With more experienced options snubbed, England then turned to new boy Archer to deliver the over that would make or break their entire tournament.

But Archer was not alone in the moments leading up to a potentially career-defining spell, with Stokes at his side to give advice.

Stokes had seen the World Twenty20 final slip away from England in 2016 as he conceded four consecutive sixes to West Indies' Carlos Brathwaite, making him well-placed to speak to Archer.

The Barbados-born star later disclosed those crucial words of advice as he recovered from a first-ball wide to limit New Zealand to an agonising 15.

"Stokesy came over and told me, win or lose, today will not define me as a player," Archer said. "He told me everyone believes in me and Rooty [Joe Root] also came over and gave me some inspirational words.

"Stokesy told me that, even if we lost, it wouldn't be the end of the world, but in saying that I'm really pleased we won.

"He probably went through the same feeling when he bowled the last over [in 2016] and that is why he came over to me.

"He just told me that there would be a World T20 next year and we'd have more chances to win in the future, so it helped."

Stokes discussed the decision to hand Archer the ball in good humour, saying: "I definitely wasn't going to bowl it after last time.

"Jofra Archer, I backed him all the way, the talent he's got is incredible and he's showed up on the world stage and shown how good he is."

'Who said cricket was boring?' England's incredible win over New Zealand dominated front and back pages across newspapers in United Kingdom.

England claimed their maiden Cricket World Cup title in extraordinary fashion at Lord's on Sunday, beating the Black Caps courtesy of having hit more boundaries.

New Zealand had made 241-8 after batting first, only for England to match that and reach 15 in a Super Over, a tally the Black Caps also managed.

'Who said cricket was boring?' read the front page of Monday's The Daily Telegraph.

On the cover of The Independent, a headline read: 'Howzat for a game of cricket!'

'Champagne Super Over' led the front page of the Daily Mirror and Metro as England's media lapped up the win.

Meanwhile, the back page of The Sun read: 'They think it's all super over.. it is now', alongside a photo of captain Eoin Morgan kissing the trophy.

The Black Caps' defeat was their second straight in the World Cup final, following on from their 2015 loss to Australia.

'End of the World! Heartbroken Black Caps lose by zero runs', led The New Zealand Herald's online sport section.

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