Jurgen Klopp admitted Liverpool have been "affected" by a tough pre-season after their penalty shoot-out defeat to Manchester City in the Community Shield, but said he was encouraged by the Reds' performance at Wembley.

Liverpool lost three and drew one of their five pre-season friendlies heading into their 1-1 Community Shield draw and subsequent 5-4 shoot-out defeat to City.

The European champions suffered defeats to Borussia Dortmund, Sevilla and Napoli, drew with Sporting CP and beat Lyon during a run that left Klopp with mixed feelings ahead of his side's Premier League season opener against Norwich City on Friday.

Reflecting on Liverpool's performance against City, he said: "I thought they looked pretty hungry. That doesn't mean it will work out but we fought today.

"After all the things that were said about the competition, both teams wanted to win it desperately, I saw that.

"My team is not in doubt about being satisfied or whatever, to stop working or stop running. The character of the team is still incredibly good.

"We had a difficult pre-season but the boys did what they had to do and were affected by it. We played football games against really good teams and that didn't feel too good.

"It was very important we all gave ourselves and our supporters a sign of the performance today. Now let's carry on."

Klopp said his squad to face Norwich would be boosted by the return of vice-captain James Milner, who missed the trip to Wembley due to a muscle strain.

Milner, 33, played a vital role in Liverpool's successes last season, making 31 Premier League appearances and 12 in the Champions League.

The versatile midfielder will rejoin the squad in plenty of time to face Norwich, according to Klopp, who said: "It was a minor muscle injury. I would say he can probably train tomorrow, although I am not 100 per cent sure.

"For today it did not work out, but I think by at least Tuesday he can train."

James Milner was scathing of Joris Gnagnon's "disgraceful" challenge on Yasser Larouci that marred the friendly between Liverpool and Sevilla.

Gnagnon was shown a straight red card for a horrendous tackle on Liverpool teenager Larouci, who was forced to leave the field on a stretcher in Sunday's 2-1 loss to Sevilla.

Sevilla defender and second-half substitute Gnagnon wildly kicked out at the 18-year-old with 14 minutes remaining in Boston, where tempers flared.

Gnagnon apologised post-match but Milner told LFCTV: "Was it too much? I thought so yes, it was a disgraceful tackle.

"We know it's only a friendly, but I mean, you don't see many red cards in friendlies, do you?

"Their guy said it is down to the referee and it's a tackle and a foul, but it's very disappointing. We [responded] in the right way.

"It is a tough one for the referee because you don't want to use red cards in friendlies and it is a rare thing to see.

"It's not easy to get hold of the game, you don't normally see too many tackles [like Gnagnon's] but it is a disgrace really."

Larouci reportedly left Fenway Park on crutches after Jurgen Klopp's Liverpool succumbed to Alejandro Pozo's 90th-minute winner.

Liverpool's friendly against Sevilla was marred by a shocking challenge on Yasser Larouci that forced the Reds youngster to leave the field on a stretcher in Boston.

Jurgen Klopp's Liverpool suffered a late 2-1 loss to Sevilla, but Sunday's result was overshadowed by Joris Gnagnon's horrendous tackle on Larouci.

In a feisty game at Fenway Park, Sevilla substitute Gnagnon was shown a straight red card with 14 minutes remaining after wildly kicking out at Larouci.

Larouci required lengthy treatment before the 18-year-old was taken away on a stretcher as tempers flared in the United States.

Despite Sevilla's numerical disadvantage, Julen Lopetegui's LaLiga side were victorious thanks to Alejandro Pozo's 90th-minute winner.

It came after Divock Origi had cancelled out Nolito's opener on the stroke of half-time with an emphatic close-range finish.

James Milner's future at Liverpool is uncertain as the veteran revealed he was still waiting to hear about possible contract talks.

Milner is out of contract at the end of the season and could be set for an exit from Anfield, where he arrived on a free transfer in 2015.

The versatile 33-year-old, who helped Liverpool win the Champions League last season, said he had not heard back from the club regarding a possible new deal.

"As it stands, last year we spoke to the club and asked them if they wanted to do something and they said not at that time," Milner told UK media.

"We haven't heard anything since, so that's where we are at.

"All I can do is concentrate on my football and do what I can, but in terms of where I am with my contract, that's what has happened up until now and I haven't heard anything from the club."

Milner has made at least 40 appearances in all competitions in each of his four seasons at Liverpool, including playing 45 times in 2018-19.

The former England international, who has regularly been praised by manager Jurgen Klopp, hopes he can continue performing.

"Everyone pipes on about my age and stuff [and] I understand you are going to get that," Milner said.

"There are three things to it – availability, fitness and performance level. Hopefully I am delivering all three."

Jurgen Klopp believes Joel Matip's influence on his Champions League-winning Liverpool side is underrated.

The defender played a key role at the back for Liverpool alongside Virgil van Dijk in the second half of last season, helping the Reds reign in Europe after finishing second to Manchester City in an incredible Premier League title race.

Van Dijk's performances in Liverpool's stellar campaign have seen him come to be regarded as the finest defender in world football.

However, asked about Van Dijk at a media conference ahead of their friendly meeting with Borussia Dortmund, Klopp said: "I think everything about him has been said, what a guy he is, what a player he is, but not a lot of people spoke about the impact Joel Matip had in the last third of the season.

"I don't see a lot of centre-backs in the world who are better in that period, 100 per cent, pretty much without any mistakes.

"Virgil was the constant in that last line [of defence] and it felt always good when you saw him there. He organises a lot of things on the pitch. He's a fantastic player and was a pretty good signing."

The impact of James Milner in the Liverpool dressing room has also become clear and while Klopp feels the 33-year-old still has plenty to offer as a player, he would be willing to offer the former England international an opportunity to cut his teeth as a coach at Anfield.

"There are still a few good years to come [from Milner] and I’m not sure if we already have to think about what he can do after his career," Klopp added.

"But I'm pretty sure for a guy like him there's always a door open at our club, 100 per cent.

"You could see in different moments last season how much it meant to him, four years back [when Milner joined on a free transfer] I don't know what people in Liverpool thought about him, but it was a brilliant idea in that moment because without players like Milly success in football is impossible."

James Milner's team talks might not be fit for public consumption but Jurgen Klopp values them as part of the Liverpool midfielder's "outstanding" attitude and leadership.

Now 33, the experienced former England international is set to embark upon his fifth season with the Reds.

It will be his first as a Champions League winner and, with Klopp hesitant to upset the balance by adding new signings, the core of the side that exceeded expectations last term will remain unchanged.

That means the same level of responsibility for Premier League veteran Milner, a player the Reds boss trusts to tell home truths in close confines.

"His attitude is outstanding," Klopp told Liverpool's website. "Millie is a sports guy, in each sport he does he is brilliant. Without Millie it wouldn't have been possible [to have the same level of success].

"His kind of a little bit dirty dressing-room talks I cannot do, these things you say in the dressing room that I am not allowed to say in public.

"That's the last little kick and that's nice.

"Millie looks again in pre-season like [he's in] in his early 20s, but he isn't. He knows that, and we try to respect that. But not only in the game is he [almost unstoppable], in training it's the same."

Milner's professionalism provides the perfect example for youngsters like striker Rhian Brewster, who looks increasingly close to a breakthrough at Anfield.

The 19-year-old has stirred excitement with three goals in two pre-season games, but any first-team minutes over the coming months will be provided free of pressure and expectation.

"We think he is ready, to be honest, but we have to see when and how often and stuff like this," Klopp said.

"He was injured for a long time. He is a fantastic footballer, we fought really hard to get him [from Chelsea] and then to keep him.

"Now he is here and I think he sees the chance, the chance is there and that's very good."

James Milner scored twice as an understrength Liverpool won 3-1 at Bradford City in a pre-season friendly on Sunday.

Mohamed Salah, Virgil van Dijk and Jordan Henderson were among the big-name absentees ahead of the Premier League club's forthcoming tour to the United States.

That left midfielder Milner to provide the first-half entertainment in a match staged to raise funds for the charity co-founded by former Liverpool and Bradford defender Stephen Darby, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in September.

Ex-England international Milner opened the scoring with a shot that deflected in off James Vaughan's head, then converted a penalty after Ryan Kent was hacked down inside the area.

Rhian Brewster squeezed in a third from a narrow angle before Jurgen Klopp made 10 changes at half-time, only goalkeeper Simon Mignolet continuing after the break.

Bradford grabbed a late consolation when substitute Eoin Doyle converted from the spot, teenager Adam Lewis having fouled Clayton Donaldson.

The Reds, 6-0 winners over Tranmere Rovers on Thursday, next face Borussia Dortmund in Indiana, which could see the return of several regulars.

Criticism of Lionel Messi and Neymar for not being "team players" suggests former Barcelona coach Louis van Gaal does not like players that "detract from the coach", according to Rivaldo.

Van Gaal, who coached Rivaldo at Camp Nou, claimed Barca and Paris Saint-Germain had fallen short in the Champions League because Messi and Neymar had been playing for themselves.

The ex-Manchester United manager advised the star duo to be more like Liverpool midfielder James Milner, a European champion in 2018-19, in order to return their clubs to winning ways.

But Rivaldo appears to believe Van Gaal simply does not like outstanding individual talents, as he responded in an Instagram post, including an image of Messi, Neymar and the Dutchman.

"Messi, Neymar and Cristiano Ronaldo are difference-making players and neither the team nor the coach knows how they do those otherworldly things," the World Cup winner wrote.

"But there are many coaches who do not like these players because they detract from the coach himself, so they prefer to talk about these players as if they do not know how to play as a team and they are good only individually.

"I played football for more than 24 years and I know very well that many coaches were very average when they played and others were not players.

"Today, as coaches, they want their team to play as a team for them to have the merit of a great coach.

"If you have a player like Pele, Johan Cruyff, Rivellino, Garrincha, Messi, Neymar, Cristiano Ronaldo, Ronaldo Fenomeno, Rivaldo, Ronaldinho, Zidane, Romario, Kaka, Maradona, Zico, Mbappe, Figo, Stoichkov, Hagi, etc, it is easier.

"But it does not mean you are going to be champions. If you also have a team that does not play well tactically, it can mean that you are not going to be a champion.

"I prefer difference-making players because football is joy and everyone likes something different. The team is always important, but you need to have different players who can do something more on the pitch."

Lionel Messi and Neymar limit the success of Barcelona and Paris Saint-Germain because they are not "team players", according to former Blaugrana coach Louis van Gaal.

Messi is considered one of the greatest players of all time, while Neymar is the most expensive signing in history, yet Barca have not won the Champions League since 2015. PSG, meanwhile, are still waiting on their first such title.

And Van Gaal, who coached at Camp Nou from 1997 to 2000 and 2002 to 2003, believes the two individuals must take responsibility for these failings.

"Look at Barcelona. How many Champions Leagues have they won with what they say is the best player in the world?" he told El Pais.

"Look at Neymar at PSG. How many Champions Leagues have they won? I like Neymar and Messi as individual players but not as team players. I believe that in team games, there is nothing more important than the team player."

Extending his point, Van Gaal compared Messi and Neymar unfavourably to versatile Liverpool midfielder James Milner.

"One of the best is James Milner," he said. "In the final of the Champions League, he played as a defender and as a midfielder. It's great that he can offer that at 33.

"I think Messi should ask himself how it is possible that he has not won a Champions League for so long.

"I am neither in the dressing room nor in training at Barcelona. I cannot judge. I like Messi as an individual player. He is the best individual player in the world because his statistics are amazing. I like him.

"But why has he not won the Champions League since five years ago? Why? As a captain, you must ask yourself why the team does not win in Europe.

"Barca have a wonderful squad. You cannot say that [Ivan] Rakitic is bad, or that [Philippe] Coutinho is bad, or that [Jordi] Alba is a bad player, or [Marc-Andre] Ter Stegen a bad goalie, or Arthur or [Arturo] Vidal.

"I think Messi is also responsible for what is happening in Barcelona - not only the coach. Players have a substantial part of responsibility for what happens on the team."

Van Gaal was not overly concerned by reports Neymar is set to rejoin Messi at Barca, yet he does feel the Blaugrana captain is given too much freedom by his coaches.

"I remember that Neymar at Barca played for Messi's service," the ex-Manchester United boss said. "I'm not against Neymar. He is fabulous. But at PSG, he does not play for the team.

"And I believe that every player must play for the team - even Messi. [Barcelona] have a staff of 30 players and I think Messi must adapt to the team and not the other way around.

"[Pep] Guardiola did play for the benefit of the team but recent coaches have adapted too much to Messi instead of protecting the team spirit. That is the most important."

Assessing Barca's 4-0 semi-final second-leg loss to Liverpool, Van Gaal said: "If there is a true team spirit, at the highest level this result is impossible."

On PSG, he added: "They do not have the right team spirit. It is obvious. I saw them at the Parc des Princes the day they beat Bayern 3-0 in the Champions League in 2017.

"I saw them on the field: the team-mates were not happy with Neymar's style of play. And they are still not happy."

Liverpool and Tottenham were lacking the star quality expected of them as the Reds triumphed 2-0 in one of the most disappointing Champions League finals in memory.

Mohamed Salah scored after just two minutes from the penalty spot before 85 minutes of scant little action at either end gave way to a second goal from Liverpool substitute Divock Origi.

It was not the game either set of fans expected, but there were still key moments and interventions that ensured Europe's most coveted trophy headed to Merseyside.

Here's how we rated the players at the Wanda Metropolitano.

TOTTENHAM

Hugo Lloris: 7
Had no chance with the penalty and was otherwise excellent, making a superb save from Andy Robertson shortly before half-time to keep Spurs in touch. Could do little about Origi's goal.

Jan Vertonghen: 6
Did well to keep Salah at bay early in the second half and ventured forward to support a Spurs attack that failed to bare its teeth.

Danny Rose: 6
Fed Son Heung-min and Dele Alli throughout but saw much of his service frittered away, particularly early on.

Kieran Trippier: 6
Like Rose, Trippier poured forward to little effect in the opening stages and his late forays rarely proved effective.

Toby Alderweireld: 6
Was left bloodied at the end of a bruising encounter but could not get across in time to stop Origi from doubling Liverpool's lead three minutes from time.

Christian Eriksen: 6
Squandered a good chance when space opened up for him in first-half stoppage time and saw his curling free-kick saved by Alisson late on.

Harry Winks: 5
Effective around the halfway line, but like his team-mates seemed to freeze when approaching the final third. Replaced by Lucas Moura after 66 minutes.

Son Heung-min: 7
Showed flashes of energy and endeavour but was outmuscled by Virgil van Dijk or outwitted by Alisson when chances came his way.

Dele Alli: 6
Just as he did in the semi-final second leg against Ajax, Alli misplaced passes early on but grew into the game, only to fluff his lines when Tottenham's three best chances fell to him in the second half.

Moussa Sissoko: 5
Suffered a torrid opening to the game when Sadio Mane's cross hit his arm after 26 seconds and lost the key midfield battle against Jordan Henderson that could have turned the game in Spurs' favour.

Harry Kane: 5
Barely involved in the first half, Kane improved in the last 20 minutes as Tottenham pressed for an equaliser, but it was too little, too late from the England captain.

Substitutes

Lucas Moura: 6
Could have been Tottenham's saviour again but side-footed somewhat tamely at Alisson when the ball fell to him 12 yards out.

Eric Dier: 5
Replaced the disappointing Sissoko and fared little better in the heart of Tottenham's midfield.

Fernando Llorente: 5
Sent on late as Mauricio Pochettino sought the kind of heroics he delivered against Ajax but failed to make a mark on the game.

LIVERPOOL

Alisson: 7
Faced no shots in the first half but remained alert enough to make a crucial double-save from Son and Moura – and a superb one from Eriksen – when it mattered most.

Trent Alexander-Arnold: 7
One of Liverpool's major attacking threats in the first half, firing narrowly wide with an audacious 25-yard drive.

Virgil van Dijk: 7
As calm and assured as you would expect of the PFA Players' Player of the Year and showed his pace and composure to cut Son's mazy dribble short after 75 minutes.

Joel Matip: 7
Viewed as the potential weak link in Liverpool's side by some, Matip did not let his side down and helped to keep Kane eerily quiet before providing the assist for Origi's goal.

Andy Robertson: 6
Linked up with Mane to cause Tottenham problems early on and put in a solid performance defensively.

Jordan Henderson: 7
Harried and pressed Tottenham when he had to, doing just enough to keep Winks and Sissoko from settling into the game.

Georginio Wijnaldum: 5
The game passed him by in the first half and he was little better after the break, making him the obvious choice to come off for James Milner.

Fabinho: 7
Combined with Henderson to nullify the Spurs midfield, helping the England man form a wall on the halfway line that snuffed out Sissoko and Alli time and again.

Mohamed Salah: 7
Lashed home Liverpool's opener with supreme confidence and teed Milner and Mane up for good second-half chances despite seeing relatively little of the ball.

Sadio Mane: 7
Ran at Spurs from the outset and forced the penalty before playing a key role in Liverpool's late resurgence.

Roberto Firmino: 5
After a very quiet first half, Firmino cut an even more subdued figure after the interval and was replaced by Origi just before the hour-mark.

Substitutes

Divock Origi: 8
There was a buzz of excitement at the Liverpool end when Origi replaced Firmino and he did not disappoint, lashing the only chance that came his way into the bottom corner of Lloris' net.

James Milner: 7
Reinvigorated Liverpool on the hour, firing just wide from the edge of the box and rallying the troops to push for the second.

Joe Gomez: 5
Replaced Mane late on but had little to do.

Jurgen Klopp has described his Liverpool side as the best he has ever taken into a final ahead of Saturday's Champions League showdown against Tottenham.

Klopp's Borussia Dortmund were defeated by Bayern Munich in the Champions League final in 2013, while he was on the losing side again last year as Real Madrid prevailed in Kiev.

The Reds have enjoyed a superb campaign, finishing second in the Premier League with a whopping 97 points, and produced a remarkable second-leg comeback against Barcelona to set up the mouth-watering clash with Spurs at the Wanda Metropolitano at the weekend.

Klopp is in awe of his side's achievements this season and believes they are perfectly positioned to win a first Champions League since 2005.

"I love them all, they have all given everything," he told a media conference. "I've never been part of a final with a better team, that's true.

"I'm not so surprised because the boys have a mix of potential and attitude in the best way I have ever witnessed. That's just brilliant, exceptional, and that brought us where we are.

"It's a sensational situation, being here again is great. We wanted it, really desperately, but it looked like it would slip through our fingers in the group stage. I'm really happy that we can do it again."

Klopp reserved special praise for James Milner and Jordan Henderson, who he believes epitomise the hunger to improve that is so prevalent throughout his squad.

"The best piece of character of this team is the constant readiness for development," he explained.

"Take James Milner. He is 33 now, but he's still developing. He's taking really big steps, calming down here and using his unbelievable skills in better moments.

"He's an example, like Henderson. They always want to make the next step; it's just in them, and it helps a lot."

Liverpool beat Tottenham in both their Premier League meetings this season, most recently at Anfield in March, but Klopp does not think that will give his side the edge on Saturday.

"It will be very tight, no doubt," he said. "The quality of Tottenham and us is pretty similar. The difference between us in the league is consistency. We won both games, but both 2-1.

"The home game was a tight game with a lucky goal from us in the last minute. [Mauricio] Pochettino is right; emotions will be completely different. You have to use the emotions but in the right circumstances. It's a special game, but we have to bring ourselves in the right mood."

Liverpool midfielder James Milner will be supporting Manchester United for the first time, but he will avoid watching their clash against City.

Wednesday's Manchester derby shapes as being vital in the Premier League title race, with Jurgen Klopp's men two points clear at the top but City holding a game in hand.

Milner, a former City and Leeds United midfielder, said he would be supporting Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's men.

"First time in my life," he said.

"But I won't be watching. It's a bit of a waste of energy, willing the ball in the other goal.

"I can't do anything about it. I'll maybe put my phone away for a few hours and check it after. I've no idea what I'll do, maybe go out for some food."

With three games left, Liverpool are up to 88 points and could finish the campaign with 97 but still not win a first league title since 1990.

While Liverpool have matches against Huddersfield Town, Newcastle United and Wolves left, Manchester City will meet Burnley, Leicester City and Brighton and Hove Albion after the derby.

"There's three games left after that [derby]. People think United is a challenge, but it's not the only one," Milner said.

"It's an old cliche, but the Premier League is tough – whoever you play, teams battling at the bottom."

Jurgen Klopp revealed how Liverpool's attention to detail meant they opted not to cut the grass at Melwood in preparation for their trip to Cardiff City.

The Reds returned to the Premier League summit with a 2-0 triumph in the Welsh capital on Sunday, Georginio Wijnaldum opening the scoring in the 57th minute before James Milner's late penalty wrapped up the points.

Liverpool not only had to overcome a dogged home side but also a dry pitch and warm conditions, though they were not caught out by the playing surface thanks to Klopp's pre-match plans at the training ground.

The Merseyside club now have 88 points, already their highest ever total in a Premier League campaign with three fixtures still to go.

"Yesterday we didn't cut the grass at Melwood and didn't water it,' Klopp told Sky Sports.

"Obviously it's how people do it, so we trained on it and it helped, because it's so difficult, so different. 

"I didn't want to come here and be surprised by it, so we trained already for one hour and 10 minutes on a dry pitch, so the boys were used to it.

"It's not about it not being possible, you just have to be ready for things not to happen quickly and not to get frustrated. 

"We deserved the three points, it's an outstanding moment and 88 points is pretty special. This team deserves it."

Liverpool put the pressure back on Manchester City in the title race after taking over top spot again on Sunday.

Jurgen Klopp's Reds returned to the Premier League summit thanks to a hard-fought 2-0 win away at struggling Cardiff City, Georginio Wijnaldum and James Milner scoring the goals in the second half.

The result lifts Liverpool two points ahead of their rivals, though City do still have a game in hand going into the closing weeks of the campaign.

Pep Guardiola's side can leapfrog over the leaders with victory against Manchester United at Old Trafford on Wednesday, though Milner admitted Liverpool are at least making it tougher for the reigning champions to retain their crown.

"All we can do is keep the pressure on them and win our games," the former City midfielder told Sky Sports. 

"It makes it tougher for them, as if we slip up it gives them that little cushion, allows them a draw or a slip-up.

"All we can do is win the rest of our games and hopefully that's good enough. If not, fair play to City, but we are asking all the questions of them that we can.

"Both teams have been ruthless and clinical in doing their jobs. It's not easy week on week - we've lost one game all year and were second [before Sunday's result]. We go back top now, though, and puts a bit of pressure on them.

"We just have to concentrate on being perfect and will see if that's good enough."

Wijnaldum's opener - a well-struck shot from a set-piece routine - was crucial against Cardiff, with the home side having made life tough for their opponents.

Yet despite having to wait until the 57th minute to break the deadlock, the Netherlands international was always confident Liverpool would win after controlling the first half.

"It's always a relief, especially at this time of the season. You know that you have to win - in the first half we created chances but didn't score," Wijnaldum said in his post-match interview. 

"Everyone was waiting for a goal and when you get it, it's a relief. I was really happy, and the fans were really happy, too."

Liverpool maintained their pursuit for a first league title in 29 years with a battling 2-0 victory over relegation-threatened Cardiff City on Sunday.

After Manchester City moved to the summit with a hard-fought triumph of their own against Tottenham just over 24 hours earlier, the Reds were made to sweat in the April sunshine by a side occupying the final relegation spot in the table.

Eventually, Liverpool found a clever way to break down a stubborn Cardiff defence, Georginio Wijnaldum meeting Trent Alexander-Arnold's corner with a powerful first-time finish.

A foul on Mohamed Salah by Sean Morrison allowed James Milner to wrap up a ninth successive win in all competitions for Jurgen Klopp's side from the penalty spot, meaning they now sit two points clear of the reigning champions, who have a game in hand.

After booking their place in the Champions League semi-finals in midweek, Liverpool returned to domestic duties knowing only a victory would suffice in the Welsh capital.

Roberto Firmino carelessly lifted their best chance of the first half over the top, wasting good work by fellow forwards Salah and Sadio Mane as his left-footed shot cleared both the advancing Neil Etheridge and the crossbar.

Cardiff's goalkeeper was needed to make a close-range save to deny Salah shortly after, though Liverpool did not pick up the pace until after the interval, leading to Wijnaldum’s 57th-minute strike from a well-worked set piece.

Having wasted a free header with the score at 1-0, letting Alisson off the hook after the goalkeeper had failed to deal with a corner, Morrison was adjudged to have pulled down Salah in the other penalty area, allowing Milner - who replaced fellow substitute Fabinho due to a head injury - to put the result beyond doubt.

 

What does it mean? Over to you, City

For some time now, the Manchester derby has appeared the crucial fixture in deciding who will be crowned champions.

Pep Guardiola’s side can leapfrog Liverpool again with victory at Old Trafford on Wednesday, putting them in pole position to retain their title with three games remaining. Astonishingly, Klopp’s squad could end up as bridesmaids on 97 points.

Gini shows his bottle

Wijnaldum's form has dipped during recent weeks, yet the midfielder made a crucial impact in a must-win situation, showing excellent technique to slam home a rolling ball.

Morrison's unwanted impact

The Bluebirds captain had a glorious chance to nod in an unexpected equaliser only to fluff his lines, while his grappling with Salah ended any hopes the home side had of getting something from the game.

What's next? 

Liverpool host relegated Huddersfield Town at Anfield next on Friday, while Cardiff City travel to another Championship-bound club in Fulham the following day.

Page 1 of 4
© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.