We disagreed on many things – Klinsmann explains abrupt Hertha resignation

By Sports Desk February 12, 2020

Jurgen Klinsmann put his abrupt resignation as Hertha Berlin coach down to disagreements with the club about "many things", particularly his responsibilities.

Klinsmann was hired by Hertha in November following the departure of Ante Covic and he was heavily backed in the transfer market, with Lucas Tousart, Krzysztof Piatek, Matheus Cunha and Santiago Ascacibar all arriving in a reported €80million splurge last month.

But after Saturday's 3-1 home defeat by Mainz left them 14th in the Bundesliga, the 55-year-old quit his role citing a lack of "trust" from the club's hierarchy.

On Wednesday he went into greater depth about his decision in a video streamed on social media, explaining his frustration at not having greater control.

"Conditions were very difficult for me, perhaps because I've had other experiences in other countries. I've experienced life in Italy and France and England, of course," the former Tottenham, Monaco and Inter striker said.

"In Germany we're used to having a manager on the substitutes' bench at the side of the pitch and that he participates, that he's there for the players, and keeps the door open for them. I wasn't used to that anymore.

"I know the English model for a manager - they're called managers in England, not coaches - has only one job and that's being the boss of the club.

"They're different in Germany, where everyone gets to have their say, everyone plays a role, the whole management structure.

"In the end only one can decide, and I feel it has to be the coach, and we [him and the club] disagreed there. Unfortunately, we disagreed on many things."

But he reassured supporters who suggested Klinsmann was leaving the club in a mess, with the former Bayern Munich boss convinced Hertha are in a healthy position despite their proximity to the bottom three.

"A lot of you said it ended in chaos - that's absolutely not true, absolutely not true," he continued.

"This team is stabilised. We came in and the team was practically in a relegation place, level on points, and now there's a six-point difference. The team is stabilised and playing in whole different way to the way we found it.

"The goal for the year is survival, next year the goal is towards Europe. The goals are very important. If you don't have goals, there's no point in getting out of bed in the morning."

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